Webinar: Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for the Treatment of Cushing’s Disease

Mon, Jun 13, 2016 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT

Presented by:
Dr. Maria Koutourousiou
Webinar DescriptionAn update on the diagnosis and treatment options of Cushing’s disease. Description of the endoscopic endonasal approach for the management of CD. Surgical videos demonstration and comparison with the microscopic transsphenoidal approach. Surgical outcomes and adjuvant treatment.

Presenter Bio

Dr. Mary Koutourousiou is an attending Neurosurgeon and Assistant Professor at the University of Louisville. She is the Director of the Pituitary and Skull Base Program. Dr. Koutourousiou received her M.D. from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece and completed her neurosurgical residency at the General Hospital of Athens “G. Gennimatas”, in Greece. She underwent subspecialty fellowship training in Endoscopic Pituitary Surgery and Minimally Invasive Neurosurgery at the UMC St. Radboud, Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. She moved to the United States in 2010 and completed four years of research and a clinical fellowship in Endoscopic and Open Skull Base Surgery at UPMC Presbyterian in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Dr. Koutourousiou has published extensively in the field of endoscopic skull base surgery. Her studies have been presented in national and international neurosurgical meetings. Dr. Koutourousiou’s work in skull base surgery has been recognized by the European Skull Base Society and the World Federation of Skull Base Societies.

Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4982773766837282305?utm_source=newsletter_199&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=webinar-announcement-endoscopic-endonasal-surgery-for-the-treatment-of-cushing-s-disease

Webinar on Management Options for Pituitary Tumors March 22

Dr. Andaluz will cover the full breadth of treatment options from managing endocrine function, surgical procedures (transsphenoidal, endoscopic, and keyhole approaches), radiotherapy / radiosurgery, and the importance of getting care at a multidisciplinary center.

Dr. Norberto Andaluz is a neurosurgeon with the Mayfield Clinic and University of Cincinnati Brain Tumor Center. He is also Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Cincinnati, Surgical Director of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit, and Director of Neurotrauma at the University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute. He specializes in the treatment of all disorders and diseases of the brain and spine, but in particular, traumatic brain injury, aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke, carotid artery disease, moyamoya disease and brain tumors (with special training in skull base tumors like pituitary adenoma). Dr. Andaluz received his medical degree from Unversidad Nacional de Rosario in Argentina. He completed his residency in neurosurgery at Instituto de Neurología y Neurocirugía at Sanatorio Parque in Rosario, Argentina and earned a fellowship in cerebrovascular surgery from the University of Cincinnati. Professional memberships include the American Heart Association, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, National Neurotrauma Society, Neurocritical Care Society and North American Skull Base Society.

Register at http://pituitary.org/events/webinar-management-options-for-pituitary-tumors

RARE Webinar! Learning More on Informed Consent

a doctor in his office showing an informed consent document and pointing with a pen where the patient must to sign

a doctor in his office showing an informed consent document and pointing with a pen where the patient must to sign


Wednesday, November 18, 2015 10:00 am
Pacific Standard Time (San Francisco, GMT-08:00)


Informed consent is intended to provide patients, clinical trial participants, and others undergoing medical procedures with the information they need to make a decision about whether to undergo a specific procedure or participate in research. The process of informed consent can sometimes be very legal in nature leading to lack of clarity and misunderstanding. This webinar will explain the informed consent process, why patients should pay attention to it, and why rare disease advocates may want to get involved in the process.

Rare disease organizations play a critical role in connecting patients with researchers and the informed consent document is critically important. It outlines who will have access to research data that results from a study. Understanding the informed consent process and how to engage will help patients receive the greatest benefit.


Megan O'Boyle bio photoMegan O’Boyle

Megan’s 15-year-old daughter, Shannon has Phelan-McDermid Syndrome (PMS), an ultra rare condition. This diagnosis includes autism, intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, ADHD, lymphedema, and other medical conditions.

For the past 5 years Megan has volunteered for the PMS Foundation’s Research Support Committee. She is the Principal Investigator for the Phelan-McDermid Syndrome Data Network (PMS_DN, PCORnet) and the Phelan-McDermid Syndrome International Registry (PMSIR). She directed the biosample collection at the 2012 PMSF Family Conference, creating a biorepository of over 30 DNA and fibroblast samples.

Megan is passionate about the importance of the patient’s voice in: research, drug development, clinical trial design, development of related legislation, and quality of life decisions. She advocates for data sharing, collaborating with other advocacy groups, sharing resources, a genetics-first approach and streamlining IRB practices and policies.

Megan and her family live in Arlington, VA.


john-wilbanksJohn Wilbanks

John Wilbanks is the Chief Commons Officer at Sage Bionetworks. Previously, Wilbanks worked as a legislative aide to Congressman Fortney “Pete” Stark, served as the first assistant director at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, founded and led to acquisition the bioinformatics company Incellico, Inc., and was executive director of the Science Commons project at Creative Commons. In February 2013, in response to a We the People petition that was spearheaded by Wilbanks and signed by 65,000 people, the U.S. government announced a plan to open up taxpayer-funded research data and make it available for free. Wilbanks holds a B.A. in philosophy from Tulane University and also studied modern letters at the Sorbonne.

Danny_LevineDaniel Levine, Founder & Principal, Levine Media Group

Daniel Levine is an award-winning business journalist who has reported on the life sciences, economic development, and business policy issues throughout his 25-year career. Since 2011, he has served as the lead editor and writer of Burrill Media’s acclaimed annual book on the biotech industry and hosts The Burrill Report’s weekly podcast. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Industry Standard, TheStreet.com, and other national publications.


Register here: https://globalgenes.org/webinarinformedconsent/

Webinar: Diagnosis and Management of Acromegaly: A Clinical Update

Presented by
Lisa Nachtigall, MD
Co-director Neuroendocrine Clinical Center
Massachusetts General Hospital

Register Here

After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar.

Contact us at webinar@pituitary.org with any questions or suggestions.

Date: Monday, July 27, 2015
Time: 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time

Presenter Bio
Lisa B. Nachtigall, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the clinical co-director of the Neuroendocrine Clinical Center at Massachusetts General Hospital and course director in Clinical Neuroendocrine at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Nachtigall earned her medical degree from New York University (NYU) School of Medicine in New York City. She completed her internship and residency in internal medicine at Bellevue Hospital Center/NYU school of Medicine, and a clinical fellowship in endocrinology and metabolism, as well as a research fellowship in reproductive endocrinology at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Nachtigall’s work has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Neurosurgery, Pituitary, and the Clinical Endocrinology among others. She serves on the editorial board of Pituitary and as an ad hoc reviewer for many endocrine journals. Dr Nachtigall has been a presenter at national and international medical conferences, and she is currently an investigator on several clinical studies of acromegaly and pituitary tumors.

Day Twenty-six, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2015

It’s Sunday again, so this is another semi-religious post so feel free to skip it 🙂

I’m sure that many would think that this is a semi-odd choice for all-time favorite hymn.

My dad was a Congregational (now United Church of Christ) minister so I was pretty regular in church attendance in my younger years.

Some Sunday evenings, he would preach on a circuit and I’d go with him to some of these tiny churches.  The people there, mostly older folks, liked the old hymns best – Fanny Crosby and so on.

So, some of my “favorite hymns” are those that I sang when I was out with my Dad.  Fond memories from long ago.

In 1986 I was finally diagnosed with Cushing’s after struggling with doctors and trying to get them to test for about 5 years.  I was going to go into the NIH (National Institutes of Health) in Bethesda, MD for final testing and then-experimental pituitary surgery.

I was terrified and sure that I wouldn’t survive the surgery.

Somehow, I found a 3-tape set of Readers Digest Hymns and Songs of Inspiration and ordered that. The set came just before I went to NIH and I had it with me.

At NIH I set up a daily “routine” of sorts and listening to these tapes was a very important part of my day and helped me get through the ordeal of more testing, surgery, post-op and more.

When I had my kidney cancer surgery, the tapes were long broken, but I had replaced all the songs – this time on my iPod.

Abide With Me was on this tape set and it remains a favorite to this day.  Whenever we have an opportunity in church to pick a favorite, my hand always shoots up and I request page 700.  When someone in one of my handbell groups moves away, we always sign a hymnbook and give it to them.  I sign page 700.

I think that many people would probably think that this hymn is depressing.  Maybe it is but to me it signifies times in my life when I thought I might die and I was so comforted by the sentiments here.

This hymn is often associated with funeral services and has given hope and comfort to so many over the years – me included.

If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, you will ask what you desire, and it shall be done for you.

~John 15:7

Abide With Me

Words: Henry F. Lyte, 1847.

Music: Eventide, William H. Monk, 1861. Mrs. Monk described the setting:

This tune was written at a time of great sorrow—when together we watched, as we did daily, the glories of the setting sun. As the last golden ray faded, he took some paper and penciled that tune which has gone all over the earth.

Lyte was inspired to write this hymn as he was dying of tuberculosis; he finished it the Sunday he gave his farewell sermon in the parish he served so many years. The next day, he left for Italy to regain his health. He didn’t make it, though—he died in Nice, France, three weeks after writing these words. Here is an excerpt from his farewell sermon:

O brethren, I stand here among you today, as alive from the dead, if I may hope to impress it upon you, and induce you to prepare for that solemn hour which must come to all, by a timely acquaintance with the death of Christ.

For over a century, the bells of his church at All Saints in Lower Brixham, Devonshire, have rung out “Abide with Me” daily. The hymn was sung at the wedding of King George VI, at the wedding of his daughter, the future Queen Elizabeth II, and at the funeral of Nobel peace prize winner Mother Teresa of Calcutta in1997.

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide;

The darkness deepens; Lord with me abide.

When other helpers fail and comforts flee,

Help of the helpless, O abide with me.

Swift to its close ebbs out life’s little day;

Earth’s joys grow dim; its glories pass away;

Change and decay in all around I see;

O Thou who changest not, abide with me.

Not a brief glance I beg, a passing word;

But as Thou dwell’st with Thy disciples, Lord,

Familiar, condescending, patient, free.

Come not to sojourn, but abide with me.

Come not in terrors, as the King of kings,

But kind and good, with healing in Thy wings,

Tears for all woes, a heart for every plea—

Come, Friend of sinners, and thus bide with me.

Thou on my head in early youth didst smile;

And, though rebellious and perverse meanwhile,

Thou hast not left me, oft as I left Thee,

On to the close, O Lord, abide with me.

I need Thy presence every passing hour.

What but Thy grace can foil the tempter’s power?

Who, like Thyself, my guide and stay can be?

Through cloud and sunshine, Lord, abide with me.

I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to bless;

Ills have no weight, and tears no bitterness.

Where is death’s sting? Where, grave, thy victory?

I triumph still, if Thou abide with me.

Hold Thou Thy cross before my closing eyes;

Shine through the gloom and point me to the skies.

Heaven’s morning breaks, and earth’s vain shadows flee;

In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.


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