“How can you leave her like this?”

A mother has revealed the anguish her family suffered after her daughter (16), who is in need of brain surgery, was turned away from Beaumont Hospital.

The National Centre for Neurosurgery had no beds or theatre access for nine patients with malignant brain tumours last Friday.
One of the people who was turned away was 16-year-old Chloe Holian from Donegal.

Her mother Caitriona explained to the Anton Savage Show on TodayFM that the road to treatment has been fraught with setbacks.

“I can’t stress how happy I am with the neurosurgeon and his team are there but it seems our consultant’s hands are tied, what am I supposed to do?” she said.

Chloe was diagnosed in July with a recurrence of Cushing’s syndrome, a metabolic disorder which is caused by abnormally high levels of the hormone cortisol in the blood stream.

After being promised treatment in July and then August, the Letterkenny girl was finally admitted on Thursday and was fasting for a procedure on Friday morning when she was told it was cancelled.

“When we got down they told us that they decided to put off the surgery for a couple of days,” said Caitriona.

She was told that the doctors wanted to perform a dexamethasone suppression test first to confirm that Chloe was, in fact, suffering from Cushing’s – despite previous diagnosis revealing that she was.

However, she soon found out that the test couldn’t be performed.

“At 11am someone in scrubs came around to say it wasn’t fair but he had to tell us she won’t be doing the surgery… and she wouldn’t be getting the major test either,” said Caitriona.

She said he was very empathetic of their situation.

“I felt sorry for him having to tell us that news… I asked him ‘how can you leave her like this?’

“He promised that he was going to organise this test himself. It was quite difficult as you need four people in the surgery to do this test, you need the radiographer, neurosurgeon, endocrinologist and anesthetist.”

Unfortunately, an anesthetist was not available for the test.

Caitriona said that Chloe was quite upset at the news. One of the side-effects of her condition is excessive weight gain and the student has gained six stone since last September.

“She had psyched herself up for the surgery,” explained her mother.

“Everybody was around her encouraging her, they threw a party for her before she went because it was a big thing. Chloe has no confidence because she’s put on an extra six stone. She was looking forward to getting her old self back, she just wanted to go and do this operation and get it over and done with.

“For anybody to have a little bit of a weight gain they can be conscious of it but if you’re 16-years-old and you’ve gained six stone and you can’t explain it…”

Caitriona said the family were forced to pack their bags and return to Donegal but, as of today, they have still not received a rescheduled appointment.

The mother-of-three is struggling to juggle home life with trips to Dublin but she said the family’s life is on hold until the tumour is removed.

This is the second time that Chloe has developed Cushing’s, in 2009 she was sent to London for surgery as treatment was not yet available in Ireland.

Patients lives are being threatened by delays, according to the head of the country’s national brain surgery centre. Clinical Director Mohsen Javadpour says people are at risk of dying while they’re waiting for treatment.

From http://www.independent.ie/life/how-can-you-leave-her-like-this-mothers-anguish-as-daughter-16-in-need-of-brain-surgery-is-turned-away-from-beaumont-35029557.html

New Diagnostic Criteria for Subclinical Hypercortisolism using Postsurgical Hypocortisolism

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2016 Jun 24. doi: 10.1111/cen.13145. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

There is no consensus on the biochemical diagnostic criteria for subclinical hypercortisolism (SH). Using parameters related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, we aimed to develop a diagnostic model of SH for predicting postsurgical hypocortisolism and metabolic complications.

DESIGN:

Prospective and cross-sectional, observational, multicentre study in Korea.

METHODS:

After exclusion of overt Cushing’s syndrome, adrenal incidentaloma (AI) patients who underwent unilateral adrenalectomy (n = 99) and AI patients (n = 843) were included. Primary outcome was defined as the presence of postsurgical hypocortisolism; secondary outcome was the presence of ≥4 complications (components of the metabolic syndrome and low bone mass). Postsurgical hypocortisolism was determined on the fifth postsurgery day using the ACTH stimulation test.

RESULTS:

Thirty-three of the 99 patients developed postsurgical hypocortisolism. Analysis of the presurgery overnight 1-mg dexamethasone suppression test (1-mg DST) showed that all patients with cortisol levels of >138 nmol/l experienced postsurgical hypocortisolism, whereas those with levels of ≤61 nmol/l did not. The models of (i) 1-mg DST >138 nmol/l or (ii) >61 nmol/l with the presence of one among low levels of ACTH and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate had the highest accuracy (89·9%, P < 0·001) and odds ratio [OR 111·62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 21·98-566·74, P < 0·001] for predicting postsurgical hypocortisolism. Finally, patients with the same criteria in the 843 AI patients showed the highest risk for having ≥4 complications (OR 3·51, 95% CI 1·84-6·69, P < 0·001), regardless of gender, age, body mass index and bilaterality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our proposed model is able to accurately predict subtle cortisol excess and its chronic manifestations in AI patients.

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Elevated late-night salivary cortisol may indicate recurrent Cushing’s disease

Carroll TB, et al. Endocr Pract. 2016;doi:10.4158/EP161380.OR.

 

Elevated late-night salivary cortisol may serve as an early biochemical marker of recurrent Cushing’s disease, and prompt intervention may result in clinical benefits for people with Cushing’s disease, according to recent study findings.

According to the researchers, late-night salivary cortisol level is more sensitive for detecting Cushing’s disease recurrence compared with urinary free cortisol or a dexamethasone suppression test.

Ty B. Carroll, MD, assistant professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin Endocrinology Center and Clinics in Menomonee Falls, and colleagues evaluated 15 patients (14 women; mean age, 49.1 years) with postsurgical recurrent Cushing’s disease (mean time to recurrence, 3.3 years) after initial remission to determine the performance of urinary free cortisol and late-night salivary cortisol measurements for detecting recurrent Cushing’s disease.

Participants were identified as having Cushing’s disease between 2008 and 2013; there was no standard for follow-up, but after remission confirmation participants were followed at least every 6 months after surgery for 2 years and then annually thereafter. Late-night salivary cortisol was the primary biochemical test to screen for recurrence, and follow-up tests with a dexamethasone suppression test, urinary free cortisol or other tests were performed if late-night salivary results were abnormal or if suspicion of recurrence was high.

Of the cohort, 80% had normal urinary free cortisol (< 45 µg/24 hours) at recurrence. Primary transphenoidal adenoma resection was performed in all participants. Evidence of pituitary adenoma on MRI at the time of recurrence was present in seven of 12 participants with normal urinary free cortisol and two of three participants with abnormal urinary free cortisol. Normal renal function was present in all participants, and 14 underwent testing with late-night salivary cortisol, dexamethasone suppression test and urinary free cortisol.

Of participants with normal urinary free cortisol at recurrence, nine had an abnormal dexamethasone suppression test (cortisol 1.8 µg/dL), and all had at least one elevated late-night salivary cortisol measurement (> 4.3 nmol/L). Mean late-night salivary cortisol was 10.2 nmol/L, and mean urinary free cortisol was 19.9 µg/24 hours.

Therapy for recurrent Cushing’s disease was administered in 11 of the 12 participants with abnormal urinary free cortisol. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-staining pituitary adenoma was confirmed in three participants who underwent repeat transphenoidal adenoma resection. Pharmacotherapy was administered to seven participants with normal urinary free cortisol, and two additional participants underwent bilateral adrenalectomy.

Abnormal dexamethasone suppression test was found in two participants with elevated urinary free cortisol at the time of recurrence, and two participants had confirmed abnormal late-night salivary cortisol. All three participants with elevated urinary free cortisol at the time of recurrence underwent therapy.

“This study has shown potential clinical benefit of either surgical or medical therapy in recurrent [Cushing’s disease] patients with elevations of [late-night salivary cortisol] and normal [urinary free cortisol],” the researchers wrote. “We believe that the outcomes observed in this retrospective case series suggest that the risk/benefit ratio of early treatment needs to undergo a more rigorous prospective evaluation utilizing [late-night salivary cortisol] elevation as an early biochemical marker of recurrent [Cushing’s disease].” – by Amber Cox

Disclosure: Carroll reports being a consultant for Corcept Therapeutics. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

From http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/online/%7B9ea4e4ed-6428-49b8-9b2a-11462cb21349%7D/elevated-late-night-salivary-cortisol-may-indicate-recurrent-cushings-disease

Video: Adrenalectomy for Cushing’s Syndrome Surgical Management

Adrenalectomy for Cushing Syndrome Surgical Management by Dr Anup Gulati

History of Patient
A 35 yrs old female with complaint of…
Weight Gain over last 2 years (weighing 115 kg at present)
Pulse 70, BP 124/76. No history of episodes of hypertension.
CECT whole abdomen suggestive of left adrenal 5×5 cm cystic mass
Dexamethasone suppression test positive for Cushing’s disease.
Rest all hormone profile normal.

Adrenal glands are attached with kidneys sometimes release excess hormones which cause cushing’s disease. Urologists do Adrenalectomy procedure which can cure Cushing’s disease.

 

Resolution of the physical features of Cushing’s syndrome in a patient with a cortisol secreting adrenocortical adenoma after unilateral adrenalectomy

A 37-year-old woman developed clinical manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome over a span of 2 years. Physical examination revealed features that best describe Cushing’s syndrome, such as wide purple striae (>1 cm) over the abdomen, facial plethora and easy bruisability.1  Other features observed were hypertension, moon facies, acne, a dorsocervical fat pad, central obesity and dyslipidaemia.

The diagnosis of hypercortisolism was confirmed using a 1 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test (19.7 ng/dL, N: <1.8) and 24 h urine free cortisol (185.9 μg/24 h, N: 3.5–45). A suppressed adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level (4 pg/mL, N: 5–20) and a lack of hyperpigmentation suggested ACTH-independent Cushing’s syndrome. Further work up using CT with contrast of the adrenals showed a 2.4×2.3×2.4 cm right adrenal mass. The patient then underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy of the right adrenal gland. Steroids was started postoperatively and tapered over time. Histopathology results were consistent with an adrenocortical adenoma (2.5 cm widest dimension). Six months after surgery, there was resolution of the physical features, weight loss and improvement in blood pressure.

Figure 1 is a serial photograph of the physical features seen in Cushing’s syndrome, such as moon facies, a dorsocervical fat pad and wide purple striae, taken preoperatively, and at 3 and 6 months after surgery. With treatment, physical and biochemical changes of Cushing’s syndrome both resolve through time.2 The time course of the resolution of these changes, however, is varied.2 ,3 We observed that the physical features were ameliorated at 3 months and resolved at 6 months.

Learning points

  • Physicians as well as patients should be aware that improvement of the features of Cushing’s syndrome after treatment does not occur immediately.

  • Dramatic resolution of the physical features of Cushing’s syndrome, however, can be observed as early as 6 months after surgery.

Figure 1

Physical features of Cushing’s syndrome (top to bottom: moon facies, a dorsocervical fat pad and wide purple striae (>1 cm) over the abdomen) documented before surgery, and at 3 and 6 months after surgery.

Footnotes

  • Twitter Follow John Paul Quisumbing at @jpquisumbingmd

  • Contributors JPMQ worked up the case and wrote the case report. MASS reviewed the case report and critically appraised it. JPMQ incorporated his suggestions.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

References

From http://casereports.bmj.com/content/2016/bcr-2016-215693.short?rss=1

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