Improvement of cardiovascular risk factors after adrenalectomy in patients with adrenal tumors and Subclinical Cushing Syndrome

Eur J Endocrinol. 2016 Jul 22. pii: EJE-16-0465. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Beneficial effects of adrenalectomy on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with Subclinical Cushing Syndrome (SCS) are uncertain. We sought to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis with the following objectives: 1) determine the effect of adrenalectomy compared to conservative management on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with SCS and 2) compare the effect of adrenalectomy on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with SCS versus those with a non-functioning (NF) adrenal tumor.

METHODS:

Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial were searched on November 17th, 2015. Reviewers extracted data and assessed methodological quality in duplicate.

RESULTS:

We included 26 studies reporting on 584 patients with SCS and 457 patients with NF adrenal tumors. Studies used different definitions of SCS. Patients with SCS undergoing adrenalectomy demonstrated an overall improvement in cardiovascular risk factors (61% for hypertension, 52% for diabetes mellitus, 45% for obesity and 24% for dyslipidemia). When compared to conservative management, patients with SCS undergoing adrenalectomy experienced improvement in hypertension (RR 11, 95% CI 4.3 – 27.8) and diabetes mellitus (RR 3.9, 95%CI 1.5- 9.9), but not dyslipidemia (RR 2.6, 95%CI 0.97 -7.2) or obesity (RR 3.4 (95%CI 0.95-12)). Patients with NF adrenal tumors experienced improvement in hypertension (21/54 patients), however, insufficient data exist for comparison to patients with SCS.

CONCLUSIONS:

Available low to moderate quality evidence from heterogeneous studies suggests a beneficial effect of adrenalectomy on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with SCS overall and as compared to conservative management.

[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

From http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450696

Video: Adrenalectomy for Cushing’s Syndrome Surgical Management

Adrenalectomy for Cushing Syndrome Surgical Management by Dr Anup Gulati

History of Patient
A 35 yrs old female with complaint of…
Weight Gain over last 2 years (weighing 115 kg at present)
Pulse 70, BP 124/76. No history of episodes of hypertension.
CECT whole abdomen suggestive of left adrenal 5×5 cm cystic mass
Dexamethasone suppression test positive for Cushing’s disease.
Rest all hormone profile normal.

Adrenal glands are attached with kidneys sometimes release excess hormones which cause cushing’s disease. Urologists do Adrenalectomy procedure which can cure Cushing’s disease.

 

Masked renal dysfunction in patients with adrenal Cushing’s syndrome manifested by adrenalectomy

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES

Many patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) exhibit a decline in renal function after adrenalectomy. Excessive aldosterone secretion causes glomerular hyperfiltration, and cancellation of this excessive secretion manifests the masked renal dysfunction. Considering the mineralocorticoid effect of cortisol as with aldosterone, excessive cortisol secretion may also mask the renal dysfunction of patients with adrenal Cushing’s syndrome (CS). However, postoperative changes in renal function in patients with CS have not been evaluated. We evaluated changes in renal function after adrenalectomy in patients with functional adrenal tumor.

METHODS

A total of 164 consecutive patients underwent adrenalectomy for unilateral functional adrenal tumor at our institution between January 2004 and October 2014. Of the 164 patients, we retrospectively analyzed 118 patients (PA/CS/subclinical Cushing’s syndrome [SCS]/pheochromocytoma [PCC]: n = 51/21/13/33, respectively) who were followed up for over 6 months and whose change in renal function was evaluable. Laboratory data, including baseline hormone levels before medical treatment, were collected from medical records. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values were obtained using the 3-variable Japanese equation. Renal dysfunction was defined as a 20% reduction in eGFR from baseline to within 3 times average during the 6 months post-operation. The change in eGFR before and after the operation was analyzed in each adrenal tumor.

RESULTS

The mean change in eGFR before and after the operation was -14% (range, -55%-18%) in patients with PA, -9% (-48%-23%) in patients with CS, -2% in patients with SCS, and -2% in patients with PCC. The eGFR decline in patients with PA and CS was significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0171, respectively), while there was no significant change in patients with SCS and PCC. After the operation, 39% (20/51) and 24% (5/21) of patients with PA and CS manifested renal dysfunction, respectively, while none of the patients with SCS and PCC manifested renal dysfunction. Preoperative renal function was not correlated with manifested renal dysfunction. Multivariate analysis identified older age and higher levels of plasma aldosterone concentration as independent predictors of renal dysfunction manifestation in patients with PA, while no clinical predictor was identified in patients with CS.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the first report that has shown a decline in eGFR after adrenalectomy in patients with CS. Possible masked renal damage should be considered in patients with CS as well as PA.

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Patients with ARMC5 mutations: The NIH clinical experience

Screenshot 2016-05-27 13.12.55

 

Adrenal Disorders

R Correa, M Zilbermint, A Demidowich, F Faucz, A Berthon, J Bertherat, M Lodish, C Stratakis

Summary: Researchers conducted this study to describe the different phenotypical characteristics of patients with armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) mutations, located in 16p11.2 and a likely tumor-suppressor gene. They determined that patients with bilateral adrenal enlargement, found on imaging tests, should be screened for ARMC5 mutations, which are associated with subclinical Cushing’s syndrome (CS) and primary hyperaldosteronism (PA).

Methods:

  • Researchers identified 20 patients with ARMC5 mutations (germline and/or somatic) who were enrolled in a National Institutes of Health (NIH) protocol.
  • They obtained sociodemographic, clinical, laboratory, and radiological data for all participants.

Results:

  • Three families (with a total of 8 patients) were identified with ARMC5 germline mutations; the rest of the patients (13/20) had sporadic mutations.
  • The male to female ratio was 1.2:1; mean age was 48 years and 60% of patients were African American.
  • Forty percent of patients were diagnosed with CS, 20% with subclinical CS, 30% with hyperaldosteronism, and 10% had no diagnosis.
  • The mean serum cortisol (8 am) and Urinary Free Cortisol were 13.1 mcg/dl and 77 mcg/24 hours, respectively.
  • Nearly all patients (95%) had bilateral adrenal enlargement found on CT or MRI.
  • Patients underwent the following treatments: Bilateral adrenalectomy (45%), unilateral adrenalectomy (25%), medical treatment (20%), and no treatment (10%).
  • ARMC5 mutations are associated with primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PMAH) and are also seen in patients with PA, especially among African Americans.

From http://www.mdlinx.com/endocrinology/conference-abstract.cfm/ZZ37C4C5D3BF1A4FAE9C479A696660535B/57884/?utm_source=confcoveragenl&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_content=abstract-list&utm_campaign=abstract-AACE2016&nonus=0

Day 5, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2016

In Day 9 on April 9, 2015, I wrote about how we got the Cushing’s colors of blue and yellow.  This post is going to be about the first Cushing’s ribbons.

 

I was on vacation  in September, 2001 when SuziQ called me to let me know that we had had our first Cushie casualty (that we knew about).

On the message boards, Lorrie wrote: Our dear friend, Janice died this past Tuesday, September 4, 2001. I received an IM from her best friend Janine, tonight. Janine had been reading the boards, as Janice had told her about this site, and she came upon my name and decided to IM me. I am grateful that she did. She said that she knew that Janice would want all of us to know that she didn’t just stop posting.

For all of the newcomers to the board that did not know Janice, she was a very caring individual. She always had something positive to say. Janice was 36 years old, was married and had no children. She had a miscarriage in December and began to have symptoms of Cushing’s during that pregnancy. After the pregnancy, she continued to have symptoms. When discussing this with her doctor, she was told that her symptoms were just related to her D&C. She did not buy this and continued until she received the accurate diagnosis of Cushing’s Syndrome (adrenal) in March of 2001. Tragically, Janice’s tumor was cancerous, a very rare form of Cushing’s.

Janice then had her tumor and adrenal gland removed by open adrenalectomy, a few months ago. She then began chemotherapy. She was very brave through this even though she experienced severe side effects, including weakness and dizziness. She continued to post on this board at times and even though she was going through so much, she continued with a positive attitude. She even gave me a referral to a doctor a few weeks ago. She was my inspiration. Whenever I thought I had it bad, I thought of what she was dealing with, and I gained more perspective.

Janice was having difficulty with low potassium levels and difficulty breathing. She was admitted to the hospital, a CT scan was done and showed tumor metastasis to the lungs. She then was begun on a more aggressive regimen of chemo. She was discharged and apparently seemed to be doing well.

The potassium then began to drop again, she spiked a temp and she was again admitted to the hospital. She improved and was set to be discharged and then she threw a blood clot into her lungs. She was required to be put on a ventilator. She apparently was at high risk for a heart attack. Her husband did not want her to suffer anymore and did not want her to suffer the pain of a heart attack and so chose for the doctors to discontinue the ventilator on Tuesday. She died shortly thereafter.

Janice was our friend. She was a Cushie sister. I will always remember her. Janine asked me to let her know when we get the Cushing’s ribbons made as she and the rest of Janice’s family would like to wear them in her memory. She said that Janice would want to do anything she could to make others more aware of Cushing’s.

The image at the top of the page shows the first blue and yellow ribbon which were worn at Janice’s funeral.  When we had our “official ribbons” made, we sent several to Janice’s family.

Janice was the first of us to die but there have been more, way too many more, over the years.  I’ll write a bit more about that on Day 21.

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