Massachusetts Hospital Opens New Neurosurgery Program

Please let us know your experiences with this new program!

 

Hallmark Health and Tufts Medical Center have established a new neurosurgery program at Melrose-Wakefield Hospital to bring advanced care and services to the community. Fellowship-trained neurosurgeon Mina G. Safain, MD, has been jointly hired by Hallmark Health and Tufts Medical Center to lead the new program. He will provide care at both Melrose-Wakefield Hospital and Tufts Medical Center.

The neurosurgery program is an example of clinical integration of services between Hallmark Health and Tufts Medical Center since Hallmark Health joined Wellforce as a third founding member this past January. At that time, leaders from the organizations discussed finding ways to bring specialized care traditionally performed at academic medical centers into the community hospital setting for the benefit and convenience of patients.

“Offering neurosurgery provides a service for our patients that few community hospitals can offer,” said Steven Sbardella, MD, chief medical officer at Hallmark Health. “Our clinical relationship with Tufts Medical Center enables us to bring more highly specialized care options to our patients.”

“We are extremely excited to work with the physicians at Melrose-Wakefield Hospital and look forward to increasing the services available to care for patients with neurologic diseases,” said Carl Heilman, MD, neurosurgeon-in-chief at Tufts Medical Center. “Dr. Safain is an exceptionally talented and compassionate neurosurgeon and the perfect person to spearhead the launch of this new program.”

Dr. Safain’s clinical interests include all diseases affecting the brain, spine and peripheral nervous system.  He has specific interests in minimal access procedures for degenerative, infectious and oncologic spine disorders, as well as minimally invasive treatments for brain tumors, including neuro-endoscopy.

“The opportunity to practice in the community is very important to me,” said Dr. Safain. “I look forward to working with the esteemed staff and providers at Melrose-Wakefield Hospital and Lawrence Memorial Hospital and treating the patients in the surrounding communities.”

“Welcoming such a highly-respected neurosurgeon as Mina Safain to our team is a tremendous benefit for our communities and patients across our system including Lawrence Memorial Hospital in Medford and Melrose-Wakefield Hospital,” said Dr. Sbardella.

Dr. Safain, together with Ran Ku, PA, a neurosurgery physician assistant with more than 12 years of experience, will provide neurosurgery coverage and expertise five days a week.

Dr. Safain received his medical degree from Yale University School of Medicine.  He completed his neurosurgery residency at Tufts Medical Center serving as chief resident during his final year.  Dr. Safain also completed fellowship training in pituitary and neuro-endoscopic surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Dr. Safain has published and presented nationally on a range of topics related to neurosurgical diseases and minimally invasive treatments for brain tumors.

From https://www.hallmarkhealth.org/Neurosurgery-program-established-at-Melrose-Wakefield-Hospital.html

Neurosurgeon and Otolaryngologist Team Up to Remove Tumor in Pituitary Gland

After experiencing bad headaches and double vision, Kris Johnson was diagnosed with a pituitary adenoma, a tumor of the pituitary gland at the base of the brain. Loyola ENT surgeon Chirag Patel, MD, teamed up with neurosurgeon Anand Germanwala, MD, to remove the tumor, and Ms. Johnson now is “100 percent back to normal.”

Article ID: 668877

Released: 3-Feb-2017 2:05 PM EST

Source Newsroom: Loyola University Health System

UAE Patient’s (Pituitary) Brain Tumour Removed Through Nostrils

Dubai: A 34-year-old patient working as a crane operator has undergone a remarkable new procedure of surgery at Thumbay Hospital, Dubai, that facilitated the removal of a brain tumour through the nostrils.

The patient, Mehnaj Khan, a Pakistani crane operator, underwent endoscopic trans-nasal trans-sphenoidal surgery in September, where the tumour was removed through the nose by endoscopic surgery without any cut or stitches on the skin. The father of five children has now made a full recovery, with improved vision, a hospital spokesperson said.

Khan first noticed something was wrong when his eyesight began to diminish, first the right eye, followed by the left eye. Although he had ignored his frequent bouts of headache for two years, Khan was compelled to visit an ophthalmologist due to vision deterioration. When an eye check-up revealed nothing was wrong, he was referred to to Thumbay Hospital, where an MRI scan of the brain revealed that he had a large tumour in the pituitary gland, pressing on the optic apparatus of brain and also hypothalamus, a very vital part of brain. This tumour was pressing on his optic nerves, causing him to slowly lose his sight.

Dr. Ishwar Chandra Premsagar, consultant neurosurgeon at Thumbay Hospital who operated on Khan, said: “Conventionally, such operations require surgeons to open the skull — a procedure known as a craniotomy. Alternatively, affected portions of the brain are reached via major incisions in the side of the face or inside the mouth, leaving behind major scars of the surgery. However, the patient’s tumour was removed by suctioning it out through his nose.”

An ear nose and throat (ENT) surgeon and an eye surgeon were consulted to plan the surgery and save further deterioration of vision while providing a chance for complete recovery.

Khan, who was nearly blind in one eye with the tumour growth, expressed his gratitude to the hospital and the teams of surgeons as he noticed improvement in his vision after the surgery. By the end of the week, he could read too. The patient was very thankful to the team of surgeons.

Dr Premsagar added: “The endoscope provides a close-up view of the pituitary, allowing the surgeon to remove the entire tumour out in one go through the nostrils, causing no disfigurement or damage to the brain. On the other hand, the procedure ensures far less danger of brain damage or stroke, and the patient usually makes a quicker recovery. Although post-surgery, deterioration of vision stops, but one cannot guarantee complete recovery of vision. This patient was lucky as his vision improved, but it may not happen in all patients. Hence, it is extremely important that one should ensure early consultation, diagnosis and surgery to ensure high chances of recovery.”

From http://gulfnews.com/news/uae/health/uae-patient-s-brain-tumour-removed-through-nostrils-1.1933841

“How can you leave her like this?”

A mother has revealed the anguish her family suffered after her daughter (16), who is in need of brain surgery, was turned away from Beaumont Hospital.

The National Centre for Neurosurgery had no beds or theatre access for nine patients with malignant brain tumours last Friday.
One of the people who was turned away was 16-year-old Chloe Holian from Donegal.

Her mother Caitriona explained to the Anton Savage Show on TodayFM that the road to treatment has been fraught with setbacks.

“I can’t stress how happy I am with the neurosurgeon and his team are there but it seems our consultant’s hands are tied, what am I supposed to do?” she said.

Chloe was diagnosed in July with a recurrence of Cushing’s syndrome, a metabolic disorder which is caused by abnormally high levels of the hormone cortisol in the blood stream.

After being promised treatment in July and then August, the Letterkenny girl was finally admitted on Thursday and was fasting for a procedure on Friday morning when she was told it was cancelled.

“When we got down they told us that they decided to put off the surgery for a couple of days,” said Caitriona.

She was told that the doctors wanted to perform a dexamethasone suppression test first to confirm that Chloe was, in fact, suffering from Cushing’s – despite previous diagnosis revealing that she was.

However, she soon found out that the test couldn’t be performed.

“At 11am someone in scrubs came around to say it wasn’t fair but he had to tell us she won’t be doing the surgery… and she wouldn’t be getting the major test either,” said Caitriona.

She said he was very empathetic of their situation.

“I felt sorry for him having to tell us that news… I asked him ‘how can you leave her like this?’

“He promised that he was going to organise this test himself. It was quite difficult as you need four people in the surgery to do this test, you need the radiographer, neurosurgeon, endocrinologist and anesthetist.”

Unfortunately, an anesthetist was not available for the test.

Caitriona said that Chloe was quite upset at the news. One of the side-effects of her condition is excessive weight gain and the student has gained six stone since last September.

“She had psyched herself up for the surgery,” explained her mother.

“Everybody was around her encouraging her, they threw a party for her before she went because it was a big thing. Chloe has no confidence because she’s put on an extra six stone. She was looking forward to getting her old self back, she just wanted to go and do this operation and get it over and done with.

“For anybody to have a little bit of a weight gain they can be conscious of it but if you’re 16-years-old and you’ve gained six stone and you can’t explain it…”

Caitriona said the family were forced to pack their bags and return to Donegal but, as of today, they have still not received a rescheduled appointment.

The mother-of-three is struggling to juggle home life with trips to Dublin but she said the family’s life is on hold until the tumour is removed.

This is the second time that Chloe has developed Cushing’s, in 2009 she was sent to London for surgery as treatment was not yet available in Ireland.

Patients lives are being threatened by delays, according to the head of the country’s national brain surgery centre. Clinical Director Mohsen Javadpour says people are at risk of dying while they’re waiting for treatment.

From http://www.independent.ie/life/how-can-you-leave-her-like-this-mothers-anguish-as-daughter-16-in-need-of-brain-surgery-is-turned-away-from-beaumont-35029557.html

Webinar on Management Options for Pituitary Tumors March 22

Dr. Andaluz will cover the full breadth of treatment options from managing endocrine function, surgical procedures (transsphenoidal, endoscopic, and keyhole approaches), radiotherapy / radiosurgery, and the importance of getting care at a multidisciplinary center.

Dr. Norberto Andaluz is a neurosurgeon with the Mayfield Clinic and University of Cincinnati Brain Tumor Center. He is also Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Cincinnati, Surgical Director of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit, and Director of Neurotrauma at the University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute. He specializes in the treatment of all disorders and diseases of the brain and spine, but in particular, traumatic brain injury, aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke, carotid artery disease, moyamoya disease and brain tumors (with special training in skull base tumors like pituitary adenoma). Dr. Andaluz received his medical degree from Unversidad Nacional de Rosario in Argentina. He completed his residency in neurosurgery at Instituto de Neurología y Neurocirugía at Sanatorio Parque in Rosario, Argentina and earned a fellowship in cerebrovascular surgery from the University of Cincinnati. Professional memberships include the American Heart Association, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, National Neurotrauma Society, Neurocritical Care Society and North American Skull Base Society.

Register at http://pituitary.org/events/webinar-management-options-for-pituitary-tumors

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