Helpful Endocrinologist in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Dr. Murray Gordon is an endocrinologist in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the area, including Allegheny General Hospital and Washington Hospital. He received his medical degree from Albany Medical College and has been in practice for more than 20 years. Dr. Gordon accepts several types of health insurance, listed below. He is one of 8 doctors at Allegheny General Hospital and one of 3 at Washington Hospital who specialize in Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism.

Dr. Gordon is in private practice and has an  experienced research site that is currently recruiting for a Cushing’s Syndrome Trial.  If interested in this trial, please call Ann at 412-359-5143.

 

420 E North Ave
Suite 205
Pittsburgh, PA 15212

Phone (412) 359-3426

Fax (412) 359-6974

Day 8, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2016

It’s Here!

Dr. Cushing was born in Cleveland Ohio. The fourth generation in his family to become a physician, he showed great promise at Harvard Medical School and in his residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital (1896 to 1900), where he learned cerebral surgery under William S. Halsted.

After studying a year in Europe, he introduced the blood pressure sphygmomanometer to the U.S.A. He began a surgical practice in Baltimore while teaching at Johns Hopkins Hospital (1901 to 1911), and gained a national reputation for operations such as the removal of brain tumors. From 1912 until 1932 he was a professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School and surgeon in chief at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, with time off during World War I to perform surgery for the U.S. forces in France; out of this experience came his major paper on wartime brain injuries (1918). In addition to his pioneering work in performing and teaching brain surgery, he was the reigning expert on the pituitary gland since his 1912 publication on the subject; later he discovered the condition of the pituitary now known as “Cushing’s disease“.

Read more about Dr. Cushing

Today, April 8th, is Cushing’s Awareness Day. Please wear your Cushing’s ribbons, t-shirts, awareness bracelets or Cushing’s colors (blue and yellow) and hand out Robin’s wonderful Awareness Cards to get a discussion going with anyone who will listen.

And don’t just raise awareness on April 8.  Any day is a good day to raise awareness.


harvey-book

I found this biography fascinating!

I found Dr. Cushing’s life to be most interesting. I had previously known of him mainly because his name is associated with a disease I had – Cushing’s. This book doesn’t talk nearly enough about how he came to discover the causes of Cushing’s disease, but I found it to be a valuable resource, anyway.
I was so surprised to learn of all the “firsts” Dr. Cushing brought to medicine and the improvements that came about because of him. Dr. Cushing introduced the blood pressure sphygmomanometer to America, and was a pioneer in the use of X-rays.

He even won a Pulitzer Prize. Not for medicine, but for writing the biography of another Doctor (Sir William Osler).

Before his day, nearly all brain tumor patients died. He was able to get the number down to only 5%, unheard of in the early 1900s.

This is a very good book to read if you want to learn more about this most interesting, influential and innovative brain surgeon.


What Would Harvey Say?

 

harvey-book

(BPT) – More than 80 years ago renowned neurosurgeon, Dr. Harvey Cushing, discovered a tumor on the pituitary gland as the cause of a serious, hormone disorder that leads to dramatic physical changes in the body in addition to life-threatening health concerns. The discovery was so profound it came to be known as Cushing’s disease. While much has been learned about Cushing’s disease since the 1930s, awareness of this rare pituitary condition is still low and people often struggle for years before finding the right diagnosis.

Read on to meet the man behind the discovery and get his perspective on the present state of Cushing’s disease.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about the time it takes for people with Cushing’s disease to receive an accurate diagnosis?

Cushing’s disease still takes too long to diagnose!

Despite advances in modern technology, the time to diagnosis for a person with Cushing’s disease is on average six years. This is partly due to the fact that symptoms, which may include facial rounding, thin skin and easy bruising, excess body and facial hair and central obesity, can be easily mistaken for other conditions. Further awareness of the disease is needed as early diagnosis has the potential to lead to a more favorable outcome for people with the condition.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about the advances made in how the disease is diagnosed?

Significant progress has been made as several options are now available for physicians to use in diagnosing Cushing’s disease.

In addition to routine blood work and urine testing, health care professionals are now also able to test for biochemical markers – molecules that are found in certain parts of the body including blood and urine and can help to identify the presence of a disease or condition.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about disease management for those with Cushing’s disease today?

Patients now have choices but more research is still needed.

There are a variety of disease management options for those living with Cushing’s disease today. The first line and most common management approach for Cushing’s disease is the surgical removal of the tumor. However, there are other management options, such as medication and radiation that may be considered for patients when surgery is not appropriate or effective.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about the importance of ongoing monitoring in patients with Cushing’s disease?

Routine check-ups and ongoing monitoring are key to successfully managing Cushing’s disease.

The same tests used in diagnosing Cushing’s disease, along with imaging tests and clinical suspicion, are used to assess patients’ hormone levels and monitor for signs and symptoms of a relapse. Unfortunately, more than a third of patients experience a relapse in the condition so even patients who have been surgically treated require careful long-term follow up.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about Cushing’s disease patient care?

Cushing’s disease is complex and the best approach for patients is a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals working together guiding patient care.

Whereas years ago patients may have only worked with a neurosurgeon, today patients are typically treated by a variety of health care professionals including endocrinologists, neurologists, radiologists, mental health professionals and nurses. We are much more aware of the psychosocial impact of Cushing’s disease and patients now have access to mental health professionals, literature, patient advocacy groups and support groups to help them manage the emotional aspects of the disease.

Learn More

Novartis is committed to helping transform the care of rare pituitary conditions and bringing meaningful solutions to people living with Cushing’s disease. Recognizing the need for increased awareness, Novartis developed the “What Would Harvey Cushing Say?” educational initiative that provides hypothetical responses from Dr. Cushing about various aspects of Cushing’s disease management based on the Endocrine Society’s Clinical Guidelines.

For more information about Cushing’s disease, visit www.CushingsDisease.com or watch educational Cushing’s disease videos on the Novartis YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/Novartis.

From http://www.jsonline.com/sponsoredarticles/health-wellness/what-would-harvey-cushing-say-about-cushings-disease-today8087390508-253383751.html

 

MaryO

Johns Hopkins surgeon ‘Dr. Q’ to get Hollywood treatment

DrQ

 

Brad Pitt’s production company Plan B has teamed up with Disney to develop a movie based on the life of Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, the head of brain tumor surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Quiñones-Hinojosa’s path to becoming a physician started in an unlikely place: a cotton field. He had come to the United States in 1987 from his native Mexico at the age of 19, penniless and unable to speak English. Driven to have a better life than the one he would have had in Mexico, he took jobs picking cotton, painting, and welding to pay for his tuition at San Joaquin Delta Community College in Stockton, California.

“These very same hands that now do brain surgery, right around that time they had scars everywhere from pulling weeds. They were bloody,” he told CNN correspondent Sanjay Gupta in a 2012 interview.

After earning his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and training in both general surgery and neurosurgery at the University of California, San Francisco, Quiñones-Hinojosa came to Johns Hopkins in 2005 and became a faculty member and surgeon. He specializes in brain cancer and pituitary tumors. His autobiography Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon was published in 2011 and received the International Latino Book Award in 2012.

Feeling like an outsider helped keep Quiñones-Hinojosa focused and “at the top of his game,” he told CNN. In the keynote speech delivered at Johns Hopkins University’s 2013 commencement ceremony, he elaborates, weaving together memories of his own brush with death in a work accident with his experience operating on a patient with a massive brain tumor that unexpectedly ruptured during surgery. Quoting the migrant farm worker and civil rights activist Cesar Chavez, he says, “If you are afraid, you will work like crazy.”

Plan B began developing the project—titled Dr. Q, the nickname for Quiñones-Hinojosa adopted by his patients—in 2007 after hearing a radio broadcast about the doctor and his background.

Matt Lopez, author of the popular Civil War play The Whipping Man and a former staff writer for HBO’s The Newsroom, will write the script.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Disney expects Dr. Q to be a modestly-budgeted inspirational drama. Plan B executives Pitt, Dede Gardner, and Jeremy Kleiner won Best Picture Oscars two years ago for their production work on 12 Years a Slave and were nominated this year for their work on The Big Short.

From http://hub.jhu.edu/2016/03/07/brad-pitt-disney-dr-q-movie

 

Birthday of the Message Boards

September 30, 2000 - Birth of the Message Boards

September 30, 2000 – Birth of the Message Boards

Today  is the birthday, or anniversary, of the boards starting September 30, 2000 (The rest of the site started earlier that year in July)

As of today, we have 12,043 members who have made 380,324 posts.

Find the message boards here: http://cushings.invisionzone.com/

Florida Doctors ~ So Far

florida

 

The doctors listed here have been recommended to Cushing’s Help by other patients as being helpful to them.  These physicians are familiar with the symptoms and treatment of Cushing’s Disease (pituitary) and Cushing’s Syndrome. Your primary care physician may be able to order very basic screening tests. Some of these doctors may require a referral and/or an abnormal test result prior to scheduling an appointment.

Cushing’s Help does not endorse any particular physician. Choosing a particular physician and substantiating his/her expertise is the responsibility of the individual patient.

To recommend your own doctor for this list, please fill out this form.

These doctors are also available on this map.  Please add yourself and/or your doctor.

This list is a continuing resource as new doctors are added, edited OR removed.

 

Florida

Jacksonville

Dr. Eric Sauvageau 

Specialty: Endovascular Neurosurgeon

Location: 800 Prudential Drive – Suite 1100
Jacksonville, FL

Phone: 904-388-6518

Website: http://www.baptistjax.com/doctors/endovascular-neurosurgeon/dr-eric-sauvageau-md

Patient Comment: I went to him for my IPSS procedure. I was VERY impressed by the care that I received. Dr. Sauvageau is Top-Notch! He answered all of my questions & made me feel more comfortable about the IPSS. Very caring. He made a REALLY scary test (that I had cried about many times) EASY PEASY. In fact, everyone at the hospital was super nice! I went to him based on the reviews of 2 other Cushies . He is highly experienced in the procedure and used to do IPSS tests at OSU. I had no pain afterwards and I could barely find where they went in.


 

More coming soon!

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