SteroTherapeutics Receives FDA Orphan-Drug Designation

PHILADELPHIA, April 04, 2018 — SteroTherapeutics, a privately held biopharmaceutical company developing therapies focused on metabolic diseases including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug designation for ST-002 in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic steatosis and hyperglycemia in patients with Cushing’s syndrome.

“We are pursuing a drug that has a very real potential to become the optimal agent of choice and a standard of care for these Cushing’s patients,” said Manohar Katakam Ph. D., CEO of SteroTherapeutics. “Our clinical trial will target multiple critical metabolic-related outcomes including the reduction of triglycerides, insulin resistance, weight loss, and the prevention and/or abrogation of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis.”

“The FDA’s orphan-drug designation for Fluasterone highlights the significant unmet and underserved needs for treatment in these individuals,” added Dr. Katakam. “We look forward to realizing the benefits and promise of this potential for Fluasterone in Cushing’s syndrome patients.”

The Orphan Drug Act became law in 1983. Fewer than 5,000 applicants have received this designation, according to the FDA website. Rare conditions are often described as orphan diseases or disorders when there are few or no treatment options. There are approximately 7,000 known orphan diseases.

The FDA’s Orphan Drug Designation program provides orphan status to drugs and biologics which are defined as those intended for the safe and effective treatment, diagnosis or prevention of rare diseases or disorders that affect fewer than 200,000 people in the United States.

The designation allows the sponsor of the drug to be eligible for various incentives, including a seven-year period of U.S. marketing exclusivity upon regulatory approval of the drug, as well as tax credits for clinical research costs, annual grant funding, clinical trial design assistance, and the waiver of Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) filing fees.

Cushing syndrome occurs when a patient’s body is exposed to high levels of the hormone cortisol over a long period of time (chronic hypercortisolemia) . Cushing syndrome, sometimes called hypercortisolism, affects 15,000 to 20,000 patients in the United States.

Too much cortisol can produce some of the hallmark signs of Cushing syndrome — a fatty hump between a patient’s shoulders, a rounded face, and pink or purple stretch marks on the skin. Cushing syndrome can also result in high blood pressure, bone loss and upper body obesity, increased fat around the neck, and relatively slender arms and legs. Diabetes is frequently a complication found in Cushing’s syndrome patients. These patients also develop nonalcoholic fatty disease and steatosis as a result of the chronic hypercortisolism.

About SteroTherapeutics

SteroTherapeutics, a Philadelphia, PA area based company, is focused on developing novel therapies for significant unmet needs in metabolic disease including liver diseases.

SteroTherapeutics lead products have been proven in previous human studies to possess a strong safety profile and established mechanisms of action. The company’s strategic intent is to focus on understanding disease pathways and how to safely treat and restore an optimal quality of life.  SteroTherapeutics is managed by a veteran team that has significant experience in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. The team has specific experiences in the development, manufacturing and commercialization of small molecule and biologics based products.

INVESTOR RELATIONS CONTACT:
Tony Schor, Investor Awareness, Inc. on behalf of
SteroTherapeutics, LLC
tschor@sterotx.com/ (847) 945-2222 ext. 221

From https://www.econotimes.com/SteroTherapeutics-Receives-FDA-Orphan-Drug-Designation-1236099

Rare Nasal Cancer May Have Caused Cushing’s Syndrome

A very rare case of Cushing’s syndrome developing as a result of a large and also rare cancer of the nasal sinuses gives insights into how to screen and treat such an anomaly, of which fewer than 25 cases have been reported in literature.

Paraneoplastic esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB), a very rare type of nasal tumor, may sometimes produce excess adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), leading to symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, according to a recent case report that describes a case of ACTH-secreting ENB. The report aims to demonstrate the importance of recognizing its pathophysiology and treatment.

The case report, “A Case of Cushing’s Syndrome due to Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Secretion from Esthesioneuroblastoma with Long Term Follow-Up after Resection,” was published in the journal Case Reports in Endocrinology.

It describes a 52-year-old Caucasian male who had a history of high blood pressure, severe weakness, abnormal production of urine, extreme thirstiness, and confusion.

He was scheduled to undergo surgery for a 7-centimeter skull base mass; the surgery was postponed due to severe high serum potassium concentrations and abnormally high pH levels. His plasma ACTH levels also were elevated and Cushing’s syndrome was suspected. Since imaging of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis did not show any ectopic (abnormal) sources of ACTH, the ENB was suspected to be the source.

Surgery was performed to remove the tumor, which was later found to be secreting ACTH. Consequently, following the procedure, his ACTH levels dropped to normal (below detection limit) and he did not need medication to normalize serum potassium levels. He then underwent subsequent chemoradiation and has shown no sign of recurrence 30 months after the operation, which is considered to be one of the longest follow-up periods for such a case.

Researchers declared it “a case of olfactory neuroblastoma with ectopic ACTH secretion that was treated with resection and adjuvant chemoradiation.”

“Given the paucity of this diagnosis, little is known about how best to treat these patients and how best to screen for complications such as adrenal insufficiency and follow-up,” they wrote. “Our case adds more data for better understanding of this disease.”

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/04/03/rare-nasal-cancer-caused-cushings-syndrome-case-report-says/

Case Report Shows Rare Adrenal Tumors Associated with Cushing’s Disease

Pituitary tumors that produce too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) have been associated with the development of rare tumors on the adrenal glands, called adrenal myelolipomas, for the first time in a case report.

The study, “Case report of a bilateral adrenal myelolipoma associated with Cushing disease,” was published in the journal Medicine.

Myelolipomas, composed of mature fat cells and blood-forming cells, are usually asymptomatic and do not produce hormones. In many cases, these tumors are detected by accident when patients undergo imaging scans for other conditions.

The cause of these tumors is unknown, but due to their benign nature, they do not spread to other parts of the body. However, they can grow up to 34 centimeters (about 13 inches), leading to tissue death and hemorrhage.

Researchers at Soon Chun Hyang University College of Medicine in Seoul, Korea, described the case of a 52-year-old man with myelolipoma possibly caused by an ACTH-secreting pituitary tumor.

During a routine checkup, researchers detected a mass in the patient’s spleen. Further abdominal evaluations identified tissue lesions in both adrenal glands consistent with myelolipoma. Besides the masses, the patient did not show any other Cushing-associated physical characteristics.

However, the patient’s ACTH levels were two times higher than the normal upper limit. Cortisol levels were also increased and unresponsive to low-dose dexamethasone treatment.

No additional lesions were found that could help explain the high ACTH and cortisol levels. But analysis of blood samples collected from the veins draining the pituitary glands revealed the right gland was producing too much ACTH, strongly suggesting Cushing’s disease.

Both the left adrenal gland and pituitary tumor were surgically removed. The samples collected during surgery confirmed the benign nature of the adrenal tumors, and the diagnosis of abnormal, ACTH-positive pituitary gland tissue.

Three days after the surgeries, hormone levels were back to normal. But a follow-up evaluation five months later again showed increased ACTH levels. Cortisol levels, however, were normal.

For the next seven years, the patient was evaluated every six months. During a five-year period, the size of the right adrenal gland was found to have grown. Imaging analysis confirmed the existence of small, new lesions in both pituitary glands.

“This case confers valuable information about the clinical course of adrenal myelolipoma associated with Cushing disease,” the researchers said. It also “supports the notion that ACTH can be associated with the development of bilateral adrenal myelolipomas.”

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/03/08/bilateral-adrenal-myelolipoma-associated-with-cushing-disease-case-report/

Adrenal Gland Lump Led to 5-year-old Developing Cushing’s, Starting Puberty

Non-cancerous adrenal gland tumors can lead to rare cases of Cushing’s syndrome in young children and puberty starting years before it should, a case study of a 5-year-old boy shows.

Removing his right adrenal gland eliminated the problems, the Saudi Arabian researchers said.

Their report dealt with tumors in epithelial cells, which line the surface of many of the body’s structures and cavities.

The research, “Testosterone- and Cortisol-secreting Oncocytic Adrenocortical Adenoma in the Pediatric Age-group,” appeared in the journal Pediatric and Developmental Pathology.

Most tumors in adrenal gland epithelial cells are benign and generate normal levels of hormones. But there are cases when the tumors over-produce steroids and other kinds of hormones, including sex hormones. Sometimes the over-production can lead to Cushing’s syndrome.

The 5-year-old boy’s over-production of adrenal gland hormones led to both symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome and signs that he was starting puberty, the researchers said.

One reason the case was rare is that the average age when Cushing’s develops is 40, doctors say. Another is that epithelial adrenal gland tumors account for only 0.2 percent of all tumors in children, the researchers said.

Signs that the boy was starting puberty began appearing eight months before his parents took him for treatment. Doctors discovered he had the weight gain and rounded face associated with Cushing’s, but a battery of tests detected no other problems. No family members were experiencing the symptoms he was, doctors added.

Biochemical tests showed that the boy had a high level of cortisol in his blood, which doctors were unable to lower with the corticosteroid suppression medication dexamethasone.

Physicians also discovered that the boy had elevated levels of the male hormone testosterone, the cortisol precursor 17-hydroxyprogestrone, the cortisol-releasing hormone adrenocorticotropin, and another male hormone that the adrenal gland produces — dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate

In contrast, doctors discovered a below-normal level of luteinising, a sex hormone that the pituitary gland generates.

Another unusual manifestation of the boy’s condition was that his bone growth was that of a child a year older than he.

Doctors discovered a non-cancerous tumor in his right adrenal gland that they decided to remove. When they did, they discovered no evidence of bleeding, tissue scarring or cell death.

They put the boy on a hydrocortisone supplement, which they reduced over time and finally ended.

Twenty-eight months after the surgery, the boy showed no signs of Cushing’s disease or early puberty. And his weight, cortisol and adrenocorticotropin hormone levels were normal.

“To the best of our knowledge, our patient represents the first male patient” with a benign epithelial-cell adrenal gland tumor “in the pediatric population, with clinical presentation of precocious [early] puberty and Cushing’s syndrome,” the researchers wrote.

“As these tumors are exceptionally rare, reporting of additional cases and investigation of clinicopathological [disease] data are needed for better characterization of these tumors,” they wrote.

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/02/16/cushings-syndrome-early-puberty-5-year-old-boy-case-study/

Patient’s Atypical Cushing’s Symptoms Lead to Discovery of Novel Genetic Mutations

New genetic mutations were found in a patient who exhibited atypical symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, notably an abnormal protrusion of the eye, a case report shows.

The research, “Extensive ARMC5 genetic variance in primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia that started with exophthalmos: a case report,” was published in the Journal of Medical Case Reports.

Primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PBMAH) is a disorder characterized by multiple lumps in the adrenal glands and excessive cortisol production. It is a rare cause of Cushing’s syndrome.

According to recent research, PBMAH is caused by mutations in the ARMC5 gene, which data suggest may act as a tumor suppressor.

Researchers presented the case of a 52-year-old Chinese woman who exhibited a protrusion of both eyes (exophtalmos), which was first thought to be Graves’ ophthalmopathy. An injection of triamcinolone acetonide, a corticosteroid, into the area behind the eye globe did not improve symptoms.

The patient later was diagnosed with diabetes, which was treated with insulin, and hypertension, treated with insulin and amlodipine. She also developed muscle weakness and bruised easily. She had no other relevant chronic illness or infectious disease, and did not smoke tobacco or drink alcohol.

Physical examination showed skin atrophy, moon face, buffalo hump (between the shoulders), and purplish abdominal striae (stretch marks), which researchers defined as a typical Cushingoid appearance. The patient also experienced elevated pressure inside the eye, and had edema, conjunctival congestion, and lid retraction. No liver, spleen, respiration, cardiac, abdominal, blood counts, urinary, sensory, or motor abnormalities were noted.

Biochemical evaluation showed elevated cortisol and reduced adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) levels. Administering  dexamethasone did not lower the level of cortisol. Abnormal responses of the hormone vasopressin also were detected.

A computed tomography (CT) scan of the adrenal glands showed bilateral multiple lobular masses, and an MRI of the eye orbits indicated bilateral exophthalmos with hypertrophy of the retro-orbital fat, which lines the orbit.

After PBMAH was diagnosed, the patient’s adrenal glands were removed. Pathological findings showed multiple, homogenous, golden-yellow-colored nodules on the glands.

The surgery successfully lowered the level of cortisol and increased that of ACTH. The patient began taking hydrocortisone and metformin for diabetes. After six months, her exophtlamos, blood glucose levels, and blood pressure had improved.

Genetic analysis revealed six specific ARMC5 mutations in five of the seven adrenal nodules analyzed. “All the mutations are novel and not found in available online databases,” the researchers wrote. The mutations may lead to resistance to cell death in the tumor cells, and cause an increase in the production of cortisol, they observed.

As a result of the ARMC5 mutations, gene expression (conversion of genetic information) of the messenger RNA (mRNA, which is converted from DNA in the first step of protein synthesis) was lower in the adrenal tumor samples, in comparison with normal adrenal cortex.

Overall, the study “highlights the importance of early recognition of atypical symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome such as exophthalmos, which would save the patient from harmful effects of excessive cortisol exposure,” the researchers said. Screening for ARMC5 mutations also would help improve diagnosis and genetic counseling, they said.

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/02/13/odd-cushings-symptoms-linked-genetic-mutations-case-report/

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