High Levels of MMP-9 Enzyme May Predict Tumor Recurrence in Cushing’s Patients

Measuring the levels of a specific enzyme in pituitary tumors producing excess adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) may help predict the recurrence of Cushing’s disease in patients, a study shows.

The study, “Expression of MMP-9, PTTG, HMGA2, and Ki-67 in ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors and their association with tumor recurrence,” was published in the journal World Neurosurgery.

Cushing’s syndrome is characterized by excess cortisol levels in the blood. In 70 percent of cases, this is caused by pituitary tumors making too much ACTH, a hormone that regulates cortisol production. This condition is called Cushing’s disease.

While transsphenoidal adenomectomy, a surgery to remove a pituitary gland tumor, is the first treatment choice, tumor recurrence rates can be as high as 45 percent.

Only a few studies have investigated the association between biomarkers and the risk of ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors recurring, leaving physicians with limited methods to predict which patients will have a recurrence.

Identifying biomarkers that can effectively predict the potential recurrence of Cushing’s disease would allow clinicians to look for early signs in patients and start appropriate follow-up and therapeutic protocols, avoiding long-term mortality.

Many studies have suggested that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) enzymes, the pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG), and high mobility group A 2 proteins (HMGA2) all play vital roles in the development of pituitary tumors.

Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes that work to degrade the cell’s extracellular matrix, which anchors the cell, thus enabling tumor invasion. PTTG is highly expressed in pituitary tumors, and is a marker of malignancy in many types of tumors. HMGA2 is overexpressed in various tumors, and is also associated with high malignancy.

However, whether levels of MMP-9, PTTG, and HMGA2 are related to ACTH-secreting tumor recurrence has not been investigated.

Researchers set out to determine the expression levels of MMP-9, PTTG, HMGA2, and Ki-67 (a marker of cell growth) in ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors, and evaluate their association with tumor behavior and recurrence.

They conducted a retrospective study that included 55 patients with sporadic Cushing’s disease with long-term remission after a transsphenoidal adenomectomy. Their tumor specimens were collected and examined.

Patients were divided into two groups based on whether or not they had tumor recurrence. There were 28 patients in the non-recurrent group, and 27 in the recurrent.

Results showed there was significantly increased expression of MMP-9 in tumor samples of recurrent patients, compared with the non-recurrent group. Levels of MMP-9 were also strongly associated with a shorter time period to recurrence (recurrence-free interval).

On the other hand, PTTG, HMGA2, and Ki-67 expression was not significantly different between the recurrent group and the non-recurrent group.

“ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors with higher levels of MMP-9 were associated with a higher recurrence rate and a shorter recurrence-free interval. MMP-9 could be a valuable tool for predicting recurrence of ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors,” the researchers concluded.

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/03/02/mmp-9-enzyme-levels-may-predict-tumor-recurrence-in-cushings-study/

Endoscopic and Microscopic Surgery Equally Effective in Cushing’s Disease

Using endoscopic or microscopic techniques to surgically remove the pituitary glands leads to similar remission and recurrence rates in Cushing’s disease patients, a review of 24 studies shows.

The study, titled “Outcome of endoscopic vs microsurgical transsphenoidal resection for Cushing’s disease,” was published in the journal Endocrine Connections.

In endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery, a surgeon uses a tiny camera as a guide, allowing for a panoramic surgical view with increased illumination of anatomic structures. In microsurgical transsphenoidal resection, a surgeon views through a microscope and uses minute instruments or lasers. Both procedures are used in transsphenoidal (TS) surgery to remove pituitary gland tumors, the root cause of Cushing’s disease. In transsphenoidal surgery, a surgeon accesses the pituitary gland through the nose and sinuses.

While endoscopic surgery seems to lead to better patient outcomes, it was unclear before this study if it has any advantages in patients with Cushing’s disease.

To gain more insight into the remission and recurrence rates of both techniques, researchers examined a total of 24 studies that included 1,670 adult patients with Cushing’s syndrome. Of these patients, 702 underwent endoscopic TS, and 968 underwent microsurgical TS.

The study’s authors found that remission rates were similar in both groups. In the endoscopic group, an average of 79.7 percent of patients experienced remission versus 76.9 percent in the microscopic group.

Patients who underwent endoscopic surgery experienced recurrence less often than those who underwent microscopic surgery, with recurrence rates of 11 percent and 15.9 percent, respectively. But researchers pointed out that follow-up times in the studies varied, making comparisons unreliable.

When recurrence rates were calculated by person per year, which takes follow-up time into account, both groups had a recurrence rate of approximately 4 percent per person per year.

Previous studies have shown that complications following either type of surgery occurred at comparable rates. These complications include hypothyroidism (underactivity of the thyroid gland), diabetes insipidus (a condition characterized by increased thirst), CSF leakage (leakage of fluid that normally bathes the brain and spinal cord), visual defects, hypocortisolemia (low cortisol blood levels), and hypogonadism (little or no hormones produced by the sex glands).

“We found that overall remission proportion was the same in CD patients who underwent endoscopic TS compared to patients who underwent microscopic TS. However, patients treated with the endoscopic approach for micro-adenomas were more likely to achieve remission than those treated microsurgically. Patients treated endoscopically were less likely to experience recurrence; however, when follow-up time is taken into account, this advantage disappears,” the researchers concluded.


From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/02/01/cushings-disease-transsphenoidal-surgery-study-finds-endoscopic-microscopic-procedures-equally-effective/

Temozolomide May Partially Improve Aggressive Pituitary Tumors Causing Cushing’s Disease

The chemotherapy temozolomide partially improved a case of an aggressive pituitary tumor that caused symptoms of Cushing’s disease (CD), according to a new study in Poland. However, after tumor mass and cortisol levels were stabilized for a few months, the patient experienced rapid progression, suggesting that new methods for extending the effects of temozolomide are needed.

The study, “Temozolomide therapy for aggressive pituitary Crooke’s cells corticotropinoma causing Cushing’s Disease: A case report with literature review,” appeared in the journal Endokrynologia Polska.

Aggressive pituitary tumors are usually invasive macroadenomas, or benign tumors larger than 10 mm.

A very rare subset of pituitary adenoma — particularly corticotropinoma, or tumors with excessive secretion of corticotropin (ACTH) — exhibit Crooke’s cells. These tumors are highly invasive, have a high recurrence rate, and are often resistant to treatment.

Information is not widely available about the effectiveness of treating aggressive pituitary tumors, particularly those that cause Cushing’s disease. The management of these tumors usually requires neurosurgery, followed by radiotherapy, and pharmacotherapy. However, the chemotherapy medication temozolomide has been increasingly used as a first-line treatment after initial evidence of its effectiveness in treating glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer.

In this study, researchers at the Jagiellonian University, in Poland, discussed the case of a 61-year-old man with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome caused by Crooke’s cell corticotropinoma.

The patient first presented with symptoms of severe hypercorticoidism — the excessive secretion of steroid hormones from the adrenal cortex — in December 2011. He also showed advanced heart failure, severe headaches, and impaired vision, which had started two or three years before diagnosis. Examinations revealed osteoporosis and a fracture in the Th5 vertebra.

His morning ACTH levels were high. The same was observed for mean cortisol levels even after dexamethasone treatment, which was suggestive of a pituitary tumor secreting ACTH. MRIs showed the existence of a tumor mass, later identified as a macroadenoma with high cell polymorphism, the presence of Crooke’s cells, and ACTH secretion.

The patient was referred for transsphenoidal nonradical neurosurgery, performed through the nose and the sphenoid sinus, and bilateral adrenalectomy, or the surgical removal of the adrenal glands, in 2012-2013. However, he developed fast, postoperative recurrence of hypercorticoidism and tumor regrowth. This led to three additional transsphenoidal neurosurgeries and radiotherapy.

The patient’s clinical status worsened as he developed severe cardiac insufficiency. Doctors began temozolomide treatment in April 2015, which did not result in adverse effects throughout treatment.

The initial standard dose (150–200 mg/m2) was given once daily in the morning for five consecutive days, in a 28-day cycle. The patient also received 600 mg of ketoconazole, an antifungal medication. Ondansetron was administered to prevent nausea and vomiting.

Subsequent examinations revealed clinical and biochemical improvements, including a reduction in ACTH and cortisol levels. In addition, the patient also showed reduced cardiac insufficiency, less frequent and less severe headaches, visual field improvements, and better physical fitness and mood.

However, clinical symptoms worsened after the eighth temozolomide cycle. The tumor size also suddenly increased after the ninth cycle, reaching the inner ear. Temozolomide was then discontinued and ACTH levels increased by 28 percent one month later. The patient also demonstrated deteriorated vision, hearing loss, and strong headaches.

Clinicians then decided to start treatment with the Cushing’s disease therapy Signifor (pasireotide), but a worsening of diabetes was observed, and the patient died in February 2016.

“The most probable reason for death was compression of the brainstem, which had been observed in the last MRI of the pituitary,” the researchers wrote, adding that “due to the very short duration of treatment, any conclusions on the treatment with Signifor cannot be drawn.”

Overall, “the results of the presented case suggest that [temozolomide] treatment monotherapy could have only partial response in aggressive corticotroph adenoma causing Cushing’s disease, followed by sudden progression,” the investigators wrote. This contrasts with mostly responsive cases reported in research literature, they noted.

“Therefore, further research on the factors of responsiveness and on novel methods to extend the duration of the effect of [temozolomide] should be carried out,” they wrote.

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/02/08/cushings-disease-case-study-poland-shows-temozolomide-temporarily-effective-treating-aggressive-pituitary-tumor/

Late-night salivary cortisol often fluctuates widely in Cushing’s disease

Among patients with new, persistent or recurrent Cushing’s disease, researchers observed cortisol levels that fluctuated widely over 6 months, with measurements falling into the normal range more than 50% of the time for a few patients, according to findings from a prospective study.

“Cortisol levels, as represented by late-night salivary cortisol, in Cushing’s disease patients without variable symptoms fluctuate much more widely than many endocrinologists may realize,” Laurence Kennedy, MD, FRCP, chairman of the department of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at the Cleveland Clinic, told Endocrine Today. “In patients with recurrent or persistent Cushing’s disease, the late-night salivary cortisol can be normal much more frequently than has been appreciated.”

Kennedy and colleagues analyzed late-night salivary samples (between 11 p.m. and midnight) from 16 patients with confirmed Cushing’s disease for up to 42 consecutive nights between January and June 2014 (age range, 27-62 years). Researchers defined normal late-night salivary cortisol as between 29 ng/dL and 101 ng/dL.

Within the cohort, eight patients had a new diagnosis of Cushing’s disease and underwent transsphenoidal surgery; eight patients had recurrent or persistent Cushing’s disease.

Researchers observed at least three peaks and two troughs in 12 of the 16 patients, and late-night salivary cortisol levels were in the normal range on at least one occasion in 14 patients (all patients with recurrent/persistent disease and six of eight patients with new disease). Only two of the 16 patients exhibited fluctuations that were deemed cyclical, according to researchers, with the interval between peaks approximately 4 days, they noted.

In five of the eight patients with recurrent or persistent disease, the lowest late-night salivary cortisol measurement was at or below the limit of detection on the assay and approximately 1 in 3 measurements were in the normal range, researchers found. Four patients had normal measurements more than 50% of the time.

Additionally, six of the patients with recurrent or persistent disease had measurements in the normal range on two consecutive nights on at least one occasion, two patients had six such measurements in a row, and one had 31 consecutive normal levels, according to researchers.

In six patients with newly diagnosed Cushing’s disease with at least one normal late-night salivary cortisol measurement, the maximum levels ranged from 1.55 to 15.5 times the upper limit of normal.

“First, widely fluctuant cortisol levels in patients with Cushing disease do not appear to be associated with fluctuating symptoms, at least in our patient population,” Kennedy said. “Second, you need to be careful drawing conclusions on the efficacy of potential medical treatments for Cushing’s disease based on only one or two late-night salivary cortisol levels, given the extreme variation that occurs in the untreated patient. Third, diagnosing recurrent or persistent Cushing’s disease can be challenging at the best of times, and, though it is felt that late-night salivary cortisol may be the best test for early diagnosis, it may require more than the suggested two, three or four tests on successive nights to make the diagnosis.”

Kennedy said better tests for diagnosing Cushing’s disease are needed, adding that investigating the potential utility of salivary cortisone could be useful. – by Regina Schaffer

For more information:

Lawrence Kennedy, MD, can be reached at Cleveland Clinic, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44195; email: kennedl4@ccf.org.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

From https://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/in-the-journals/%7Bf9721377-6a2a-401c-a16d-2d4624233b63%7D/late-night-salivary-cortisol-often-fluctuates-widely-in-cushings-disease

Delayed complications after transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas

World Neurosurg. 2017 Oct 5. pii: S1878-8750(17)31710-2. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.09.192. [Epub ahead of print]


Perioperative complications after transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas have been well documented in the literature; however, some complications can occur in a delayed fashion postoperatively and reports are sparse about their occurrence, management, and outcome.

Here, we describe delayed complications after transsphenoidal surgery and discuss the incidence, temporality from the surgery, and management of these complications based on the findings of studies that reported delayed postoperative epistaxis, delayed postoperative cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysm formation and rupture, vasospasm, delayed symptomatic hyponatremia (DSH), hypopituitarism, hydrocephalus, and sinonasal complications.

Our findings from this review revealed an incidence of 0.6-3.3% for delayed postoperative epistaxis at 1-3 weeks postoperatively, 18 reported cases of delayed carotid artery pseudoaneurysm formation at 2 days to 10 years postoperatively, 30 reported cases for postoperative vasospasm occurring 8 days postoperatively, a 3.6-19.8% rate of DSH at 4-7 days postoperatively, a 3.1% rate of new-onset hypopituitarism at 2 months postoperatively, and a 0.4-5.8% rate of hydrocephalus within 2.2 months postoperatively.

Sinonasal complications are commonly reported after transsphenoidal surgery, but spontaneous resolutions within 3-12 months have been reported. Although the incidence of some of these complications is low, providing preoperative counseling to patients with pituitary tumors regarding these delayed complications and proper postoperative follow-up planning is an important part of treatment planning.


carotid pseudoaneurysm; cerebrospinal fluid leak; delayed complications; epistaxis; hydrocephalus; hyponatremia; hypopituitarism; pituitary; sinonasal complication; transsphenoidal surgery; tumor

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