Long-term Outcomes and Complications from Endoscopic Versus Microscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery for Cushing’s Disease – a 15-year Single-center Study

Abstract

Background

Endoscopic endonasal surgery is the main transsphenoidal approach for pituitary surgery in many centers, however few studies compare the endoscopic and microscopic surgical approach with regard to long-term follow-up. This single-center study aimed to compare the two techniques over 15 years.

Methods

Medical records and magnetic resonance images from 40 patients with primary transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing’s disease at Sahlgrenska University Hospital between 2003 and 2018 were reviewed. Fourteen patients who underwent microscopic surgery and 26 patients who underwent endoscopic surgery were included in this study.

Results

In the microscopic group, 12 of 14 patients achieved endocrine remission, compared to 19 of 26 patients in the endoscopic group (n. s.). Three patients in each group developed a late recurrence. Complications were seen in 5 patients in the microscopic group and in 8 patients in the endoscopic group (n. s.). No serious complications, such as carotid artery damage, cerebrovascular fluid leakage, epistaxis, or meningitis, occurred in any group. The postoperative hospital stay was shorter in the endoscopic than the microscopic group.

Conclusion

Endoscopic endonasal surgery for Cushing’s disease showed no difference in remission, recurrence, and complication rates compared to the microscopic approach. The endoscopic group had a shorter postoperative hospital stay than the microscopic group, which in part may be due to the minimal invasiveness of the endoscopic approach.

References (0)

Cited by (0)

Conflicts of interest

The authors have no conflicts of interest.

Author statements

Conceptualization: D. Farahmand, E. Backlund, O. Ragnarsson and P. Trimpou

Data curation: Dan Farahmand, Erica Backlund, J. Carlqvist, T. Skoglund, T. Hallén, O. Ragnarsson, P. Trimpou.

Formal Analysis: D. Farahmand, E. Backlund

Funding acquisition: D. Farahmand

Investigation: D. Farahmand, E. Backlund, O. Ragnarsson and P. Trimpou

Methodology: D. Farahmand, E. Backlund, O. Ragnarsson and P. Trimpou

Project administration: D. Farahmand, E. Backlund, O. Ragnarsson and P. Trimpou

Supervision: D. Farahmand

Writing – original draft: Penelope Trimpou

Writing – review & editing: E. Backlund, O. Ragnarsson, T. Skoglund, T. Hallén, G. Gudnadottir, J. Carlqvist and D. Farahmand.

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From https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1878875022009640

Sparsely Granulated Corticotroph Pituitary Macroadenoma Presenting with Pituitary Apoplexy Resulting in Remission of Hypercortisolism

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aace.2022.04.003Get rights and content
Under a Creative Commons license
Open access

Highlights

• We describe a rare case of a patient with a sparsely granulated corticotroph pituitary macroadenoma with pituitary apoplexy who underwent transsphenoidal resection resulting in remission of hypercortisolism.
• Corticotroph adenomas are divided into densely granulated, sparsely granulated and Crooke’s cell tumors.
• macroadenomas account for 7-23% of patients with pituitary corticotroph adenomas
• Sparsely granulated corticotroph tumors are associated with longer duration of Cushing disease prior to diagnosis, larger tumor size at diagnosis, decreased immediate remission rate, increased proliferative marker Ki-67 and increased recovery time of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis after surgery.
• Granulation pattern is an important clinicopathological distinction impacting the behavior and treatment outcomes of pituitary corticotroph adenomas

Abstract

Background

/Objective: Pituitary corticotroph macroadenomas, which account for 7% to 23% of corticotroph adenomas, rarely present with apoplexy. The objective of this report is to describe a patient with a sparsely granulated corticotroph tumor (SGCT) presenting with apoplexy and remission of hypercortisolism.

Case Report

A 33-year-old male presented via ambulance with sudden onset of severe headache and nausea/vomiting. Physical exam revealed bitemporal hemianopsia, diplopia from right-sided third cranial nerve palsy, abdominal striae, facial plethora, dorsal and supraclavicular fat pad. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a 3.2 cm mass arising from the sella turcica with hemorrhage compressing the optic chiasm, extension into the sphenoid sinus and cavernous sinus. Initial investigations revealed plasma cortisol of 64.08 mcg/dL (Reference Range (RR), 2.36 – 17.05). He underwent emergent transsphenoidal surgery. Pathology was diagnostic of SGCT. Post-operatively, cortisol was <1.8ug/dL (RR, 2.4 – 17), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) 36 pg/mL (RR, 0 – 81), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) 0.07 uIU/mL (RR, 0.36 – 3.74), free thyroxine 1 ng/dL (RR, 0.8 – 1.5), luteinizing hormone (LH) <1 mIU/mL (RR, 1 – 12), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) 1 mIU/mL (RR, 1 – 12) and testosterone 28.8 ng/dL (RR, 219.2 – 905.6) with ongoing requirement for hydrocortisone, levothyroxine, testosterone replacement and continued follow-up.

Discussion

Corticotroph adenomas are divided into densely granulated, sparsely granulated and Crooke’s cell tumors. Sparsely granulated pattern is associated with larger tumor size and decreased remission rate after surgery.

Conclusion

This report illustrates a rare case of hypercortisolism remission due to apoplexy of a SGCT with subsequent central adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism and hypogonadism.

Keywords

pituitary apoplexy
pituitary macroadenoma
pituitary tumor
sparsely granulated corticotroph tumor
Cushing disease

Introduction

The incidence of Cushing Disease (CD) is estimated to be between 0.12 to 0.24 cases per 100,00 persons per year1,2. Of these, 7-23% are macroadenomas (>1 cm)345. Pituitary apoplexy is a potentially life-threatening endocrine and neurosurgical emergency which occurs due to infarction or hemorrhage in the pituitary gland. Apoplexy occurs most commonly in non-functioning macroadenomas with an estimated prevalence of 6.2 cases per 100,000 persons and incidence of 0.17 cases per 100,00 persons per year6. Corticotroph macroadenoma presenting with apoplexy is uncommon with only a handful of reports in the literature7. We present a case of a sparsely granulated corticotroph (SGCT) which presented with apoplexy leading to remission of hypercortisolism and subsequent central adrenal insufficiency.

Case Presentation

A 33-year-old male who was otherwise healthy and not on any medications presented to a community hospital with sudden and severe headache accompanied by hypotension, nausea, vomiting, bitemporal hemianopsia and diplopia. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the brain demonstrated a hyperattenuating 2.0 cm x 2.8 cm x 1.5 cm mass at the sella turcica with extension into the right cavernous sinus and encasement of the right internal carotid arteries (Figure 1A). He was transferred to a tertiary care center for neurosurgical management with endocrinology consultation post-operatively.

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Figure 1. hyperattenuating 2.0 cm x 2.8 cm x 1.5 cm mass at the sella turcica on unenhanced CT (A); MRI demonstrated a 1.9 cm x 3.2 cm x 2.4 cm heterogeneous mass on T1 (B) and T2-weighted imaging (C) showing small hyperintense areas in solid part of the sella mass with flattening of the optic chiasm, remodeling/dehiscence of the floor of the sella and extending into the right cavernous sinus with at least partial encasement of the ICA

In retrospect, he reported a 3-year history of ongoing symptoms of hypercortisolism including increased central obesity, dorsal and supraclavicular fat pad, facial plethora, abdominal purple striae, easy bruising, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction. Notably, at the time of presentation he did not have a history of diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, fragility fractures or proximal muscle weakness. He fathered 2 children previously. His physical examination was significant for Cushingoid facies, facial plethora, dorsal and supraclavicular fat pads and central obesity with significant axillary and abdominal wide purple striae (Figure 2). Neurological examination revealed bitemporal hemianopsia, right third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis and impaired extraocular movement. The fourth and sixth cranial nerves were intact as was the rest of his neurological exam. These findings were corroborated by Ophthalmology.

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Figure 2. Representative images illustrating facial plethora (A); abdominal striae (B, C); supraclavicular fat pad (D); dorsal fat pad (E)

Initial laboratory data at time of presentation to the hospital included elevated plasma cortisol of 64.08ug/dL (RR, 2.36 – 17.05), ACTH was not drawn at the time of presentation, normal TSH 0.89 mIU/L (RR, 0.36 – 3.74), free thyroxine 0.91ng/dL (RR, 0.76 – 1.46), evidence of central hypogonadism with low total testosterone 28.8 ng/dL (RR, 219.2 – 905.6) and inappropriately normal luteinizing hormone (LH) 1mIU/mL (RR, 1 – 12) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) 3mIU/mL (RR, 1 – 12), low prolactin <1 ng/mL (RR, 3 – 20), and normal insulin growth factor – 1 (IGF–1) 179ng/mL (RR, 82 – 242).

A pituitary gland dedicated MRI was performed to further characterize the mass, which re-demonstrated a 1.9 cm x 3.2 cm x 2.4 cm heterogenous mass at the sella turcica extending superiorly and flattening the optic chiasm, remodeling of the floor of the sella and bulging into the sphenoid sinus and extending laterally into the cavernous sinus with encasement of the right internal carotid artery (ICA). As per the radiologist’s diagnostic impression, this appearance was most in keeping with a pituitary macroadenoma with apoplexy (Figure 1B – C).

The patient underwent urgent TSS and decompression with no acute complications. Pathological examination of the pituitary adenoma showed features characteristic of sparsely granulated corticotroph pituitary neuroendocrine tumor (adenoma)8, with regional hemorrhage and tumor necrosis (apoplexy). The viable tumor exhibited a solid growth pattern (Figure 3A), t-box transcription factor (T-pit) nuclear immunolabeling (Figure 3B), diffuse cytoplasmic CAM5.2 (low molecular weight cytokeratin) immunolabeling (Figure 3C), and regional weak to moderate intense granular cytoplasmic ACTH immuno-staining (Figure 3D). The tumor was immuno-negative for: pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Pit-1) and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) transcription factors, growth hormone, prolactin, TSH, FSH, LH, estrogen receptor-alpha, and alpha-subunit. Crooke hyalinization was not identified in an adjacent compressed fragment of non-adenomatous anterior pituitary tissue. Ki-67 immunolabeling showed a 1.5% proliferative index (11 of 726 nuclei).

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Figure 3. Hematoxylin phloxine saffron staining showing adenoma with solid growth pattern (A); immunohistochemical staining showing T-pit reactivity of tumor nuclei (B); diffuse cytoplasmic staining for cytokeratin CAM5.2 (C); and regional moderately intense granular cytoplasmic staining for ACTH (D). Scale bar = 20 μm

Post-operatively, he developed transient central diabetes insipidus requiring desmopressin but resolved on discharge. His postoperative cortisol was undetectable, ACTH 36 pg/mL (RR, 0 – 81), TSH 0.07 mIU/mL (RR, 0.36 – 3.74), free thyroxine 1 ng/dL (RR, 0.8 – 1.5), LH <1mIU/mL (RR, 1 – 12), FSH 1 mIU/mL (RR, 1 – 12) and testosterone 28.8 ng/dL (RR, 219.2 – 905.6) (Table 1 and Figure 4). One month later, he reported 15 pounds of weight loss and a 5-inch decrease in waist circumference. He also noted a reduction in the dorsal and supraclavicular fat pads, facial plethora, and Cushingoid facies as well as fading of the abdominal stretch marks. His visual field defects and right third cranial nerve palsy resolved on follow up with ophthalmology post-operatively. Repeat MRI six months post-operatively showed minor residual soft tissue along the floor of the sella. He is being followed by Neurosurgery, Ophthalmology, and Endocrinology for monitoring of disease recurrence, visual defects, and management of hypopituitarism.

Table 1. Pre- and post-operative hormonal panel

POD -1 POD 0 POD1 POD2 POD3 POD16 6 -9 months Comments
Cortisol(2.4 – 17 ug/dL) 64↓ 32↓ 11↓ <1.8↓ <1.8↓ 1.8↓ HC started POD3 post bloodwork
ACTH(0 – 81 pg/mL) 41↓ 36↓ 28↓ 13↓
TSH(0.36 – 3.74 uIU/mL) 0.89 0.43 0.12↓ 0.07↓ 0.05↓ 0.73
Thyroxine, free(0.8 – 1.5 ng/dL) 0.9 0.9 1.1 1 2.1↑ 1 Levothyroxine started POD4
LH(1 – 12 miU/mL) 1↓ <1↓ 1↓ 3
FSH(1 – 12 mIU/mL) 3↓ 1↓ 1↓ 3
Testosterone(219.2 – 905.6 ng/dL) 28.8↓ <20↓ 175.9↓ Testosterone replacement started as outpatient
Testosterone, free(160 – 699 pmol/L) <5.8↓ 137↓
IGF-1(82 – 242 ng/mL) 179 79
GH(fasting < 6 mIU/L) 4.5 <0.3
Prolactin(3 – 20 ng/mL) <1↓ <1↓

POD, postoperative day; HC, hydrocortisone; ACTH, adrenocorticotropic hormone; TSH, thyroid stimulating hormone; LH, luteinizing Hormone; FSH, follicle stimulating hormone; IGF-1, insulin like growth factor – 1; GH, growth hormone

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Figure 4. Trend of select pituitary hormonal panel with key clinical events denoted by black arrows.

Discussion

Microadenomas account for the majority of corticotroph tumors, but 7% – 23% of patients are diagnosed with a macroadenoma345. It is even rarer for a corticotroph macroadenoma to present with apoplexy with only a handful of case reports or series in the literature7. Due to its rarity, appropriate biochemical workup on presentation, such as including an ACTH with the blood work, may be omitted especially if the patient is going for emergent surgery. In this case, the undetectable prolactin can reflect loss of anterior pituitary function and also suggest a functioning corticotroph adenoma due to the inhibitory effect of long term serum glucocorticoids on prolactin secretion9. After undergoing TSS, the patient developed central adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism and hypogonadism requiring hormone replacement. Presumably, the development of adrenal insufficiency demonstrated the remission of hypercortisolism as a result of apoplexy and/or TSS. The ACTH remains detectable likely representing residual tumor that was not obliterated by apoplexy nor excised by TSS given it location near the carotid artery and cavernous sinus. The presence of adrenal insufficiency in the setting of detectable ACTH is not contradictory as the physiological hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has been suppressed by the long-term pathological production of ACTH. IGF-1 and prolactin also failed to recover post-operatively. In CD where the production of IGF-1 and prolactin are attenuated by elevated cortisol, it would then be expected that IGF-1 and prolactin recover after hypercortisolism remission. However, the absence of this observation in our case is likely a sequalae of the apoplexy and extensive surgery leading to pituitary hypofunction.

We also want to highlight features of the pre-operative radiographical findings which can provide valuable insight into the subsequent histology. Previous literature has shown that, on T2-weight MRI, silent corticotroph adenomas are strongly correlated with characteristic a multimicrocystic appearance while nonfunctional gonadotroph macroadenomas are not correlated with this MRI finding10. The multimicrocystic appearance is described as small hyperintense areas with hyperintense striae in the solid part of the tumor (Figure 1C)10. This is an useful predictive tool for silent corticotroph adenomas with a sensitivity of 76%, specificity of 95% and a likelihood ratio of 15.310.

The ability to distinguish between silent corticotroph macroadenoma and other macroadenomas is important for assessing rate of remission and recurrence risk. In 2017, the WHO published updated classification for pituitary tumors. In this new classification, corticotroph adenomas are further divided into densely granulated, sparsely granulated and Crooke’s cell tumors11. DGCT are intensely Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) stain positive and exhibit strong diffuse pattern of ACTH immunoreactivity, whereas SGCT exhibit faintly positive PAS alongside weak focal ACTH immunoreactivity4,12. Crooke’s cell tumors are characterized by Crooke’s hyaline changes in more than 50% of the tumor cells4. In the literature, SGCT account for an estimated 19-29% of corticotroph adenomas131415. The clinicopathological relevance of granulation pattern in corticotroph tumors was unclear until recently.

In multiple studies examining granulation pattern and tumor size, SGCT were statistically larger13,15,16. Hence, we suspect that many of the previously labelled silent corticotroph macroadenomas in the literature were SGCT. The traditional teaching of CD has been “small tumor, big Cushing and big tumor, small Cushing” which reflects the inverse relationship between tumor size and symptomatology17. This observation appears to hold true as Doğanşen et al. found a trend towards longer duration of CD in SGCT of 34 months compared to 26 months in DGCT based on patient history13,17. It has been postulated that the underlying mechanism of the inverse relationship between tumor size and symptomatology is impaired processing of proopiomelanocortin resulting in less effective secretion of ACTH in corticotroph macroadenomas3. Doğanşen et al. also found that the recurrence rate was doubled for SGCT, while Witek et al. showed that SGCT were less likely to achieve remission postoperatively13,16.

Similar to other cases of SGCT, the diagnosis was only arrived retrospective after pathological confirmation10. Interestingly, the characteristic Crooke’s hyaline change of surrounding non-adenomatous pituitary tissue was not observed as one would expect in a state of prolonged glucocorticoid excess in this case. Although classically described, the absence of this finding does not rule out CD. As evident in a recent retrospective study where 10 out of 144 patients with CD did not have Crooke’s hyaline change18. In patients without Crooke’s hyaline change, the authors found a lower remission rate of 44.4% compared to 73.5% in patients with Crooke’s hyaline change. Together with the detectable post-operative ACTH, sparsely granulated pattern and absence of Crooke’s hyaline change in surrounding pituitary tissue, the risk of recurrence is increased. These risk factors emphasize the importance of close monitoring to ensure early detection of recurrence.

Declaration of Interests

☒ The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

☐The authors declare the following financial interests/personal relationships which may be considered as potential competing interests:

Conclusion

We present a case of a sparsely granulated corticotroph macroadenoma presenting with apoplexy leading to remission of hypercortisolism and development of central adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism and hypogonadism requiring hormone replacement.

References

Copeptin Rules Out Diabetes Insipidus Post Pituitary Surgery

The study covered in this summary was published on Research Square as a preprint and has not yet been peer reviewed.

Key Takeaways

  • A study of 78 patients who underwent elective transsphenoidal adenomectomy to remove a pituitary tumor or other lesions within the pituitary fossa at a single center in the UK suggests that postoperative plasma levels of copeptin — a surrogate marker for levels of arginine vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) — can rule out development of central (neurogenic) diabetes insipidus caused by a deficiency of arginine vasopressin following pituitary surgery.
  • The researchers suggest using as a cutoff a copeptin level of >3.4 pmol/L at postoperative day 1 to rule out diabetes insipidus. Such a cutoff yields the following:
    • A high sensitivity of 91% for ruling out diabetes insipidus.
    • A negative predictive value of 97%. Only 1 of 38 patients with a copeptin value >3.4 pmol/L at day 1 postoperatively developed diabetes insipidus.
    • A low specificity of 55%, meaning that copeptin level is not useful for diagnosing diabetes insipidus

Why This Matters

  • An estimated 1% to 67% of patients who undergo pituitary gland surgery develop diabetes insipidus, often soon after surgery, although it is often transient.
  • Diagnosing diabetes insipidus in such patients requires a combination of clinical assessment, the monitoring of fluid balance, and determining plasma and urine sodium and osmolality.
  • Currently, clinical laboratories in the UK do not have assays for arginine vasopressin, which has a short half-life in vivo and is unstable ex vivo, even when frozen, and is affected by delayed or incomplete separation from platelets.
  • Copeptin, an arginine vasopressin precursor, is much more stable and measurable by commercial immunoassays.
  • The findings suggest that patients who have just undergone pituitary gland surgery and are otherwise healthy and meet the copeptin cutoff for ruling out diabetes insipidus could be discharged 24 hours after surgery and that there is no need for additional clinical and biochemical monitoring. This change would ease demands on the healthcare system.

Study Design

  • The study reviewed 78 patients who underwent elective transsphenoidal adenomectomy to remove a pituitary tumor from November 2017 to June 2020 at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, United Kingdom.
  • Patients remained in hospital for a minimum of 48 hours after their surgery.
  • Clinicians collected blood and urine specimens preoperatively and at day 1, day 2, day 8, and week 6 post surgery.
  • The patients were restricted to 2 L of fluid a day postoperatively to prevent masking of biochemical abnormalities through compensatory drinking.
  • Diabetes insipidus was suspected when patients’ urine output was >200 mL/h for 3 consecutive hours or >3 L/d plus high plasma sodium (>145 mmol/L) and plasma osmolality (> 295 mosmol/kg) plus inappropriately low urine osmolality. Definitive diagnosis of diabetes insipidus was based on clinical assessment, urine and plasma biochemistry, and need for treatment with desmopressin (1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin).

Key Results

  • The median age of the patients was 55, and 53% were men; 92% of the lesions were macroadenomas; the most common histologic type was gonadotroph tumor (47%).
  • Among the 78 patients, 11 (14%) were diagnosed with diabetes insipidus postoperatively and required treatment with desmopressin; of these, seven patients (9%) continued taking desmopressin after 6 weeks (permanent diabetes insipidus), but the other four did not need to take desmopressin for more than a week.
  • Patients who developed diabetes insipidus were younger than other patients (mean age, 46 vs 56), and 8 of the 11 patients who developed diabetes insipidus (73%) were women.
  • Preoperative copeptin levels were similar in the two groups. At day 1, day 8, and 6 weeks postoperatively, copeptin levels were significantly lower in the diabetes insipidus group; there were no significant differences at day 2, largely because of an outlier result.
  • An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC; C-statistic) analysis showed that on day 1 after surgery, copeptin levels could account for 74.22% of the incident cases of diabetes insipidus (AUC, 0.7422). On postop day 8, the AUC for copeptin was 0.8015, and after 6 weeks, the AUC associated with copeptin was 0.7321.

Limitations

  • Blood samples for copeptin tests from patients who underwent pituitary surgery were collected at specified times and were frozen for later analysis; performing the test in real time might alter patient management.
  • The study may have missed peak copeptin levels by not determining copeptin levels sooner after pituitary gland surgery, inasmuch as other researchers have reported better predictive values for diagnosing diabetes insipidus from samples taken 1 hour after extubation or <12 hours after surgery.

Disclosures

  • The study did not receive commercial funding.
  • The authors report no relevant financial relationships.

This is a summary of a preprint research study, “Post-Operative Copeptin Analysis Predicts Which Patients Do Not Develop Diabetes Insipidus After Pituitary Surgery,” by researchers from John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, in the United Kingdom. Preprints from Research Square are provided to you by Medscape. This study has not yet been peer reviewed. The full text of the study can be found on researchsquare.com.

Read the article here: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/970357#vp_1

Consecutive Adrenal Cushing’s Syndrome and Cushing’s Disease in a Patient With Somatic CTNNB1, USP8, and NR3C1 Mutations

The occurrence of different subtypes of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome (CS) in single individuals is extremely rare. We here present the case of a female patient who was successfully cured from adrenal CS 4 years before being diagnosed with Cushing’s disease (CD).
The patient was diagnosed at the age of 50 with ACTH-independent CS and a left-sided adrenal adenoma, in January 2015. After adrenalectomy and histopathological confirmation of a cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenoma, biochemical hypercortisolism and clinical symptoms significantly improved.
However, starting from 2018, the patient again developed signs and symptoms of recurrent CS. Subsequent biochemical and radiological workup suggested the presence of ACTH-dependent CS along with a pituitary microadenoma. The patient underwent successful transsphenoidal adenomectomy, and both postoperative adrenal insufficiency and histopathological workup confirmed the diagnosis of CD. Exome sequencing excluded a causative germline mutation but showed somatic mutations of the β-catenin protein gene (CTNNB1) in the adrenal adenoma, and of both the ubiquitin specific peptidase 8 (USP8) and the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) genes in the pituitary adenoma. In conclusion, our case illustrates that both ACTH-independent and ACTH-dependent CS may develop in a single individual even without evidence for a common genetic background.

Introduction

Endogenous Cushing´s syndrome (CS) is a rare disorder with an incidence of 0.2–5.0 per million people per year (12). The predominant subtype (accounting for about 80%) is adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent CS. The vast majority of this subtype is due to an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma [so called Cushing´s disease (CD)], whereas ectopic ACTH-secretion (e.g. through pulmonary carcinoids) is much less common. In contrast, ACTH-independent CS can mainly be attributed to cortisol-producing adrenal adenomas. Adrenocortical carcinomas, uni-/bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) may account for some of these cases as well (34).

Coexistence of different subtypes of endogenous CS in single individuals is even rarer but has been described in few reports. These cases were usually observed in the context of prolonged ACTH stimulation on the adrenal glands, resulting in micronodular or macronodular hyperplasia (59). A sequence of CD and PPNAD was also described in presence of Carney complex, a genetic syndrome characterized by the loss of function of the gene encoding for the regulatory subunit type 1α of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A) (10). Moreover, another group reported the case of a patient with Cushing’s disease followed by ectopic Cushing’s syndrome more than 30 years later (8). To our knowledge, however, we here describe the first case report on a single patient with a cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenoma and subsequent CD.

Read the rest of the article at https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2021.731579/full

Paediatric patients with Cushing disease and negative pituitary MRI have a higher risk of nonremission after transsphenoidal surgery

Abstract

Objective

Diagnostic workup of Cushing disease (CD) involves imaging evaluation of the pituitary gland, but in many patients no tumour is visualised. The aim of this study is to describe the association of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with the postoperative course of paediatric and adolescent patients with CD.

Patients

Patients with a diagnosis of CD at less than 21 years of age with MRI evaluation of the pituitary before first transsphenoidal surgery were included.

Measurements

Clinical, imaging and biochemical data were analysed.

Results

One hundred and eighty-six patients with paediatric or adolescent-onset CD were included in the study. Of all patients, 127 (68.3%) had MRI findings consistent with pituitary adenoma, while the remaining had negative or inconclusive MRI. Patients with negative MRI were younger in age and had lower morning cortisol and adrenocorticotropin levels. Of 181 patients with data on postoperative course, patients with negative MRI had higher odds of not achieving remission after the first surgery (odds ratio = 2.6, 95% confidence intervals [CIs] = 1.1–6.0) compared to those with positive MRI. In patients with remission after first transsphenoidal surgery, long-term recurrence risk was not associated with the detection of a pituitary adenoma in the preoperative MRI (hazard risk = 2.1, 95% CI = 0.7–5.8).

Conclusions

Up to one-third of paediatric and adolescent patients with CD do not have a pituitary tumour visualised in MRI. A negative MRI is associated with higher odds of nonremission after surgery; however, if remission is achieved, long-term risk for recurrence is not associated with the preoperative MRI findings.

Full text at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/cen.14560

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