Postsurgical treatment often necessary in persistent, recurrent Cushing’s disease

Nearly half of adults with Cushing’s disease that persists or recurs after surgical treatment require second and sometimes third therapeutic interventions, including pituitary surgical reintervention, radiotherapy, pharmacotherapy or bilateral adrenalectomy, study data from Mexico show.

Moisés Mercado, MD, FRCPC, of the ABC Hospital Neurological and Cancer Centers in Mexico City, and colleagues evaluated 84 adults (median age, 34 years; 77 women) with Cushing’s disease to determine the long-term efficacy of secondary interventions for persistent and recurrent Cushing’s disease. Median follow-up was 6.3 years.

Overall, 81 participants were primarily treated with transsphenoidal surgery. More than half experienced long-lasting remission (61.7%); disease remained active in 16%, who were diagnosed with persistent Cushing’s disease; and 22% experienced relapse after remission and were diagnosed with recurrent Cushing’s disease.

After the initial procedure, 18 participants required pituitary surgical reintervention, including 10 with recurrent and eight with persistent disease. Radiation therapy was administered to 14 participants, including two as primary therapy and 12 after failed pituitary surgery. Pharmacologic treatment with ketoconazole was prescribed for 15 participants at one point during the course of disease. Bilateral adrenalectomy was performed in 12 participants.

Pituitary surgical reintervention was the most commonly used secondary treatment (22.2%), followed by pharmacologic therapy with ketoconazole (16%), radiotherapy (14.8%) and bilateral adrenalectomy (14.8%). More than half of participants experienced early remissions after a second operation (66.6%) and radiotherapy (58.3%), whereas long-lasting remission was reached in only 33.3% of participants who underwent a second surgery and 41.6% of participants who underwent radiotherapy. Half of participants who underwent bilateral adrenalectomy were diagnosed with Nelson’s syndrome.

Overall, 88% of participants achieved remission, and disease was biochemically controlled with pharmacologic treatment in 9.5% of participants after their initial, secondary and third-line treatments.

“The efficacy of treatment alternatives for recurrent or persistent [Cushing’s disease] vary among patients, and often, more than one of these interventions is required in order to achieve a long-lasting remission,” the researchers wrote. – by Amber Cox

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

From http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/in-the-journals/%7B5519b312-5912-4c65-b2ed-2ece3f68e83f%7D/postsurgical-treatment-often-necessary-in-persistent-recurrent-cushings-disease

Sharmyn McGraw on Blogtalk Radio

sharm

 

March 22, 2016 7:00pm Eastern  Sharmyn speaks to medical professionals about the spiritual side of pain advocacy for patients with pituitary tumors and hormonal related disorders!  She’ll share how she turned the darkest part of her life into the best part.  Watch out because Sharmyn will also use Tumor Humor to keep the message light and fun.

Sharmyn will be be speaking with her good friend Garrett Miller, Rated G Radio. Garrett is fun, smart and to say creative is an understatement.

Garrett and Sharmyn will be having a conversation about how she turned being misdiagnosed for seven horrible years with Cushing’s disease into one of the best parts of her life.

Many of you have heard her talk about Cushing’s, but very few people have heard the back story, the personal and raw part of Sharmyn’s journey… well join them on March 22, at 7:00pm eastern and you can hear it all and join in also.

Use the call in number and let’s chat.

Sharmyn McGraw joins the show Tuesday to talk about turning Pain into Passion and Passion into Action!

Listen to the archives at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ratedgradio/2016/03/22/sharmyn-mcgraw-turning-pain-into-passion

 

Global Cushing’s Syndrome Market Size 2015

Cushing’s as money makers for drug companies 😦

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Steroidogenesis inhibitors were responsible for approximately 28% of total drug sales in the 6MM in 2013, equating to around $50m. As a consequence of this trend, GlobalData expects overall revenues generated by this drug class to increase by approximately 390% to reach around $247m, encompassing 49% of total drug sales in the 6MM in 2018.

The expansion in this segment of the CS market is fuelled by the introduction of premium-priced pharmacological agents such as Novartis’ LCI699 and Cortendo AB’s NormoCort (COR-003) in the US, as well as the arrival of HRA Pharma’s Ketoconazole HRA (ketoconazole) to the European CS stage. One of the greatest unmet needs in this indication is a lack of effective drugs directed against the underlying cause of Cushing’s disease (the pituitary tumor).

Despite this demand, pharmaceutical companies are continuing to adopt a strategy that simply targets the adrenal glands. As a result, there is a vast amount of room for new or existing players to penetrate the market and capture considerable patient share.

Highlights

Key Questions Answered

Although the current standard of care (ketoconazole) is cheap and reasonably effective in most CS patients, it possesses worrying safety profiles, inconvenient dosing schedules, is difficult to obtain and can display waning efficacy over time. Newer medical treatments, for example, Novartis’ Signifor (pasireotide) and Corcept Therapeutics’ Korlym (mifepristone) address only some of these issues; yet, present their own limitations. The CS market is still marked by the existence of a multitude of unmet needs. What are the main unmet needs in this market? Will the drugs under development fulfil the unmet needs of the CS market?

The late-stage CS pipeline is sparsely populated; however, those drugs in development will be a strong driver of CS market growth. Which of these drugs will attain high sales revenues during 2013-2018? Which of these drugs will have the highest peak sales at the highest CAGR, and why?

Key Findings

One of the main drivers influencing growth in the Cushing’s syndrome market will be the introduction of second-generation steroidogenesis inhibitors, LCI699 and NormoCort (COR-003), in the US, which will rival existing standard of care medical treatments.

Another strong driver will be the arrival of Corcept Therapeutics’ Korlym (mifepristone) and HRA Pharma’s Ketoconazole HRA (ketoconazole) to the European CS market. Both drugs will stimulate significant growth here.

The launch of Novartis’ Signifor LAR (pasireotide) in the 6MM will equip physicians with a less frequently administered formulation of Signifor.

Reasons for inadequate CS treatment include poor physician awareness of the condition, delayed diagnosis, a lack of efficacious drugs for individuals suffering from severe hypersecretion, and a shortage of effective medicines targeting the source of Cushing’s disease.

Scope

Overview of Cushing’s syndrome, including epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment guidelines.

Annualized Cushing’s syndrome therapeutics market revenues, annual cost of therapies and treatment usage pattern data from 2013 and forecast for five years to 2018.

Key topics covered include strategic competitor assessment, market characterization, unmet needs, clinical trial mapping and implications for the Cushing’s syndrome therapeutics market.

Pipeline analysis: comprehensive data split across different phases, emerging novel trends under development, and detailed analysis of late-stage pipeline drugs.

Analysis of the current and future market competition in the global Cushing’s syndrome therapeutics market. Insightful review of the key industry drivers, restraints and challenges. Each trend is independently researched to provide qualitative analysis of its implications.

Reasons to buy

Develop and design your in-licensing and out-licensing strategies through a review of pipeline products and technologies, and by identifying the companies with the most robust pipeline. Additionally a list of acquisition targets included in the pipeline product company list.

Develop business strategies by understanding the trends shaping and driving the Cushing’s syndrome therapeutics market.

Drive revenues by understanding the key trends, innovative products and technologies, market segments, and companies likely to impact the Cushing’s syndrome therapeutics market in the future.

Formulate effective sales and marketing strategies by understanding the competitive landscape and by analysing the performance of various competitors.

Identify emerging players with potentially strong product portfolios and create effective counter-strategies to gain a competitive advantage.

Track drug sales in the 6MM Cushing’s syndrome therapeutics market from 2013-2018.

Organize your sales and marketing efforts by identifying the market categories and segments that present maximum opportunities for consolidations, investments and strategic partnerships.

From http://www.medgadget.com/2015/10/global-cushings-syndrome-market-size-2015-share-trend-analysis-price-research-report-forecast.html

Birthday of the Message Boards

September 30, 2000 - Birth of the Message Boards

September 30, 2000 – Birth of the Message Boards

Today  is the birthday, or anniversary, of the boards starting September 30, 2000 (The rest of the site started earlier that year in July)

As of today, we have 12,043 members who have made 380,324 posts.

Find the message boards here: http://cushings.invisionzone.com/

Cushing’s Help is 15 Today!

happybirthday-2015

 

It’s unbelievable but the idea for Cushing’s Help and Support arrived 15 years ago last night.

I was talking with my dear friend Alice, who ran a wonderful menopause site called Power Surge, wondering why there weren’t many support groups online (OR off!) for Cushing’s and I wondered if I could start one myself and we decided that I could.

The first website (http://www.cushings-help.com) first went “live” July 21, 2000 and the message boards September 30, 2000. Hopefully, with these sites, I’m going to make some helpful differences in someone else’s life!

The message boards are very active and we have weekly online text chats, weekly live interviews, local meetings, email newsletters, a clothing exchange, a Cushing’s Awareness Day Forum, podcasts, phone support and much more.

Whenever one of the members of the boards gets into NIH, I try to go to visit them there. Other board members participate in the “Cushie Helper” program where they support others with one-on-one support, doctor/hospital visits, transportation issues and more.

 

maryo colorful zebra

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