Signs and Symptoms of Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency

Major Symptoms of Adult-Onset Growth Hormone deficiency

You may be wondering if the unusual symptoms you are feeling lately may be due to growth hormone deficiency. Growth hormone is now widely recognized as an important factor in the maintenance of health and well-being. However, research shows that most people won’t experience the debilitating effects of growth hormone deficiency during their lifetime as the condition is not a cause of aging but rather serious illness or injury. If you want to learn about growth hormone deficiency signs and symptoms and what clinics like the Nexel Medical can do about this problem, keep reading.

About growth hormone deficiency in children

Growth hormone deficiency manifests differently in childhood than it does in adulthood. For normal development, there needs to be an adequate amount of circulating growth hormones in the body. The main symptom of growth hormone deficiency in children is stunted growth and developmental problems. This is a result of insufficient amounts of this important hormone in the body that is normally secreted by the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland is a small gland located at the bottom of the hypothalamus, at the base of the brain. Any damage to the pituitary gland will cause a drop in growth hormone levels that could be dangerous for children.

Growth hormone deficiency in adults

Although it would be natural to assume that there is no need for a growth hormone in the body once the growth process is over and we’ve reached adult height and weight, this is simply not the case. The human growth hormone plays a vital role in overall health up until old age. Damage to the pituitary gland from tumors is the most common cause of growth hormone deficiency in adults. People also tend to experience a decline in growth hormone levels that naturally come with age, but researchers agree that this decline is insignificant and shouldn’t cause any problems. However, damage to the pituitary gland will definitely cause major symptoms that require immediate treatment from clinics such as the Nexel Medical. According to an article published in the Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism, growth hormone deficiency has been associated with abnormalities of:

  • Neuropsychiatric and cognitive functioning

  • Cardiovascular functioning

  • The neuromuscular system

  • The skeletal system

Metabolic functioning

All these problems can be significantly reversed with growth hormone therapy. Growth hormone is now widely recognized as a hormone playing a role in the regulation of body composition, energy levels, and normal mental functioning.

Causes and symptoms of growth hormone deficiency

According to current research, 65% of all cases of growth hormone deficiency are caused by pituitary tumors. Other common causes are infections of the pituitary gland, pituitary hemorrhage, and idiopathic growth hormone deficiency. Traumatic brain injury may also lead to growth hormone deficiency in some cases. The clinical features or signs and symptoms of growth hormone deficiency are many and may seem unspecific at first. Those suspecting problems with the pituitary gland and growth hormone deficiency should look out for the following:

  • Cognitive changes (memory, processing, speed, attention)

  • Mood changes (depression, anxiety)

  • Social withdrawal

  • Fatigue and lack of strength

  • Neuromuscular dysfunction

  • Decreased bone mineral density

  • Decreased sweating

  • Weight gain and muscle loss

  • Metabolic changes (insulin resistance, dyslipidemia)

  • Treatment of growth hormone deficiency

Growth hormone deficiency in adults is usually treated with growth hormone replacement therapy. The hormone is in such cases administered intravenously or through dermal implants. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found that administering growth hormone to patients with growth hormone deficiency resulted in a reduction of visceral body fat by 30%. The researchers also noticed an improvement in bone metabolism and a decline in psychiatric complaints in these patients.

Why growth hormone pills don’t work?

Taking oral supplements claiming to contain the human growth hormone won’t work simply because the majority of it will be digested by your gastrointestinal tract before it gets the chance to reach your bloodstream. This is mainly because the human growth hormone is a protein and all proteins are broken down by the digestive tract. This was confirmed by studies as stated in an FDA-published article explaining how growth hormone administered to dairy cows cannot affect humans.

Conclusion

The human growth hormone is an important hormone for the maintenance of health, metabolism, and mental functioning. Studies on growth hormone deficiency show that most people have adequate levels of this hormone in their bodies. Although a decline in growth hormone levels comes with age, this decline is not enough to cause major changes in a person’s health and well-being. On the other hand, structural damage to the pituitary gland will cause some of the major conditions and symptoms of growth hormone deficiency. In such cases, growth hormone replacement therapy is highly advised. Clinics such as Nexel Medical are among many that offer different hormone replacement therapies including for growth hormone deficiencies.

References

Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23435439

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3183535/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19001512

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8432773

http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/ProductSafetyInformation/ucm130321.htm

From http://theinscribermag.com/health-fitness/signs-and-symptoms-of-adult-growth-hormone-deficiency.html

Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (AIP study)

Professor Márta Korbonits is the Chief Investigator for the NIHR Clinical Research Network supported familial pituitary adenomas study (AIP) which is investigating the cause, the clinical characteristics and family screening of this relatively recently established disease group.

Please tell us about the condition in layman’s terms?
Pituitary adenomas are benign tumours of the master gland of the body, the pituitary gland. It is found at the base of the brain. The most commonly identified adenoma type causing familial disease makes excess amounts of growth hormone, and if this starts in childhood the patient have accelerated growth leading them to become much taller than their peers. This condition is known as gigantism.

How rare is this condition?
Pituitary adenomas cause disease in 1 in a 1000 person of the general population. About five to seven percent of these cases are familial pituitary adenomas.

How it is normally diagnosed?
There are different types of pituitary adenomas causing quite varied diseases. Gigantism and its adult counterpart acromegaly is usually diagnosed due to rapid growth, headaches, joint pains, sweating, high blood pressure and visual problems. Pituitary adenomas grow slowly and it usually takes 2-10 years before they get diagnosed. The diagnosis finally is made by blood tests measuring hormones, such as growth hormone, and doing an MRI scan of the pituitary area.

What is the study aiming to find out?
The fact that pituitary adenomas can occur in families relatively commonly was not recognised until recently. Our study introduced testing for gene alterations in the AIP (Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein) gene in the UK, and identified until now 38 families with 160 gene carriers via screening. We also aim to identify the disease-causing genes in our other families as well.

How will it benefit patients?
The screening and early treatment of patients can have a huge benefit to patients as earlier treatment will lead to less complications and better chance to recovery. We hope we can stop the abnormal growth spurts therefore avoiding gigantism. Patients that are screened will find out if they carry the AIP gene and whether they are likely to pass on the gene to their families. For most patients, knowing they have a gene abnormality also helps them to understand and accept their condition.

How will it change practice?
As knowledge of the condition becomes more understood, genetic testing of patients to screen for AIP changes should be more commonplace. Patients can be treated knowing they have this condition, and family members who are carriers of the gene can benefit from MRI scans to monitor their pituitary gland and annual hormone tests.

How did the NIHR CRN support the study?
The familial pituitary adenoma study is on the NIHR CRN Portfolio. The study’s association with NIHR has allowed the widespread assessment of the patients, has incentivised referrals from clinicians and raised awareness of both our study and the familial pituitary adenoma condition itself.

For more information contact NIHR CRN Communications Officer, Damian Wilcock on 020 3328 6705  or email damian.wilcock@nihr.ac.uk

From https://www.crn.nihr.ac.uk/blog/case_study/national-rare-disease-day-2016-familial-isolated-pituitary-adenoma-aip-study/

Growth Hormone Deficiency Global Clinical Trials

Growth-Hormone-Deficiency

 

Growth Hormone Deficiency Global 2015 Clinical Trials Review, H2” provides an detailed overview of Growth Hormone Deficiency scenario.
Report includes top line data relating on Growth Hormone Deficiency Global clinical trials scenario.
This report on Growth Hormone Deficiency also includes an review of trial numbers as well as their (Growth Hormone Deficiency) average enrollment in uppermost/top countries which are conducted worldwide.
Growth Hormone Deficiency report also covers disease clinical trials by country (G7 & E7), sponsor type, region, trial status as well as end points status.
Report Growth Hormone Deficiency also Includes prominent drugs for in-progress trials (Note: based on number of ongoing trials).
Scope of Growth Hormone Deficiency Report:-

1. This report includes a snapshot of worldwide clinical trials landscape on Growth Hormone Deficiency scenario.
2. Report on Growth Hormone Deficiency also provides top level data related to the Global clinical trials by country (G7 & E7), sponsor type, region, trial status as well as end points status on Growth Hormone Deficiency scenario
3. Report reviews top companies involved in Growth Hormone Deficiency as well as provides enlists all trials (Trial title, Phase, and Status) pertaining to the company on Growth Hormone Deficiency scenario.
4. This report provides all the unaccomplished trials on Growth Hormone Deficiency scenario (Withdrawn, Terminated and Suspended) with reason for unaccomplishment on Growth Hormone Deficiency.
5. Report on Growth Hormone Deficiency provides enrollment trends for the past five years.
6. Report provides latest news for the past three months
7. Report Also Includes Top news in past 3 months on Growth Hormone Deficiency clinical trials review scenario.

Get Sample Copy of Report Here : http://www.marketresearchstore.com/report/growth-hormone-deficiency-global-clinical-trials-review-h1-27370#requestSample

From http://www.medgadget.com/2015/11/growth-hormone-deficiency-global-clinical-trials-review-2015-market-research-store-size-share-analysis.html

Birthday of the Message Boards

September 30, 2000 - Birth of the Message Boards

September 30, 2000 – Birth of the Message Boards

Today  is the birthday, or anniversary, of the boards starting September 30, 2000 (The rest of the site started earlier that year in July)

As of today, we have 12,043 members who have made 380,324 posts.

Find the message boards here: http://cushings.invisionzone.com/

Day 7: Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2015

Sleep.  Naps.  Fatigue, Exhaustion.  I still have them all.  I wrote on my bio in 1987 after my pituitary surgery “I am still and always tired and need a nap most days. I do not, however, still need to take whole days off just to sleep.

That seems to be changing back, at least on the weekends.  Last weekend, both days, I took 7-hour naps each day and I still woke up tired. That’s awfully close to taking a whole day off to sleep again.

In 2006, I flew to Chicago, IL for a Cushing’s weekend in Rockford.  Someone else drove us to Lake Geneva, Wisconsin for the day.  Too much travel, too Cushie, whatever, I was too tired to stay awake.  I actually had put my head down on the dining room table and fallen asleep but our hostess suggested the sofa instead.  Amazing that I traveled that whole distance – and missed the main event 😦

 

Sleeping in Rockford

 

This sleeping thing really impacts my life.  Between piano lessons, I take a nap.  I sleep as late as possible in the mornings and afternoons are pretty much taken up by naps.  I nod off at night during TV. One time I came home between church services and missed the third one because I fell asleep.

I only TiVo old tv shows that I can watch and fall asleep to since I already know the ending.

Maybe now that I’m more than 8 years out from my kidney cancer (May 9, 2006) I can go back on Growth Hormone again.  My surgeon says he “thinks” it’s ok.  I’m sort of afraid to ask my endo about it, though.  I want to feel better and get the benefits of the GH again but I dont want any type of cancer again and I certainly can’t afford to lose another kidney.

I’m feeling so old and weary today, and yesterday.  And tomorrow…

 

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