Endoscopic Surgery on a Pituitary Adenoma

Philip Theodosopoulos, M.D. is Professor and Vice-Chair of Neurological Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. He is the Director of the Skull Base Tumor Program and has extensive experience performing endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery for pituitary tumors (over 1000 operations) and other disease processes as well as tumors of the base of the skull.

In this video Dr. Theodosopoulos illustrates portions of an endoscopic resection of a pituitary adenoma.

 

To learn more about Dr. Theodosopoulos and to schedule an appointment for consultation please copy this link:
neurosurgery.UCSF.edu/index.php/about_us_faculty_theodosopoulos.html

Neurosurgeon and Otolaryngologist Team Up to Remove Tumor in Pituitary Gland

After experiencing bad headaches and double vision, Kris Johnson was diagnosed with a pituitary adenoma, a tumor of the pituitary gland at the base of the brain. Loyola ENT surgeon Chirag Patel, MD, teamed up with neurosurgeon Anand Germanwala, MD, to remove the tumor, and Ms. Johnson now is “100 percent back to normal.”

Article ID: 668877

Released: 3-Feb-2017 2:05 PM EST

Source Newsroom: Loyola University Health System

Elevated late-night salivary cortisol may indicate recurrent Cushing’s disease

Carroll TB, et al. Endocr Pract. 2016;doi:10.4158/EP161380.OR.

 

Elevated late-night salivary cortisol may serve as an early biochemical marker of recurrent Cushing’s disease, and prompt intervention may result in clinical benefits for people with Cushing’s disease, according to recent study findings.

According to the researchers, late-night salivary cortisol level is more sensitive for detecting Cushing’s disease recurrence compared with urinary free cortisol or a dexamethasone suppression test.

Ty B. Carroll, MD, assistant professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin Endocrinology Center and Clinics in Menomonee Falls, and colleagues evaluated 15 patients (14 women; mean age, 49.1 years) with postsurgical recurrent Cushing’s disease (mean time to recurrence, 3.3 years) after initial remission to determine the performance of urinary free cortisol and late-night salivary cortisol measurements for detecting recurrent Cushing’s disease.

Participants were identified as having Cushing’s disease between 2008 and 2013; there was no standard for follow-up, but after remission confirmation participants were followed at least every 6 months after surgery for 2 years and then annually thereafter. Late-night salivary cortisol was the primary biochemical test to screen for recurrence, and follow-up tests with a dexamethasone suppression test, urinary free cortisol or other tests were performed if late-night salivary results were abnormal or if suspicion of recurrence was high.

Of the cohort, 80% had normal urinary free cortisol (< 45 µg/24 hours) at recurrence. Primary transphenoidal adenoma resection was performed in all participants. Evidence of pituitary adenoma on MRI at the time of recurrence was present in seven of 12 participants with normal urinary free cortisol and two of three participants with abnormal urinary free cortisol. Normal renal function was present in all participants, and 14 underwent testing with late-night salivary cortisol, dexamethasone suppression test and urinary free cortisol.

Of participants with normal urinary free cortisol at recurrence, nine had an abnormal dexamethasone suppression test (cortisol 1.8 µg/dL), and all had at least one elevated late-night salivary cortisol measurement (> 4.3 nmol/L). Mean late-night salivary cortisol was 10.2 nmol/L, and mean urinary free cortisol was 19.9 µg/24 hours.

Therapy for recurrent Cushing’s disease was administered in 11 of the 12 participants with abnormal urinary free cortisol. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-staining pituitary adenoma was confirmed in three participants who underwent repeat transphenoidal adenoma resection. Pharmacotherapy was administered to seven participants with normal urinary free cortisol, and two additional participants underwent bilateral adrenalectomy.

Abnormal dexamethasone suppression test was found in two participants with elevated urinary free cortisol at the time of recurrence, and two participants had confirmed abnormal late-night salivary cortisol. All three participants with elevated urinary free cortisol at the time of recurrence underwent therapy.

“This study has shown potential clinical benefit of either surgical or medical therapy in recurrent [Cushing’s disease] patients with elevations of [late-night salivary cortisol] and normal [urinary free cortisol],” the researchers wrote. “We believe that the outcomes observed in this retrospective case series suggest that the risk/benefit ratio of early treatment needs to undergo a more rigorous prospective evaluation utilizing [late-night salivary cortisol] elevation as an early biochemical marker of recurrent [Cushing’s disease].” – by Amber Cox

Disclosure: Carroll reports being a consultant for Corcept Therapeutics. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

From http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/online/%7B9ea4e4ed-6428-49b8-9b2a-11462cb21349%7D/elevated-late-night-salivary-cortisol-may-indicate-recurrent-cushings-disease

Low Immediate Postoperative Serum-Cortisol Nadir Predicts The Short-Term, But Not Long-Term, Remission After Pituitary Surgery For Cushing’s Disease

Cushing’s disease is an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and the primary treatment is microscopic or endoscopic transsphenoidal selective adenectomy. The aims of the present study were to evaluate whether the early postoperative S-cortisol level can serve as a prognostic marker for short- and long-term remission, and retrospectively review our own short and long term results after surgery for Cushing’s disease.

Methods: This single centre, retrospective study consists of 19 consecutive patients with Cushing’s disease who underwent transsphenoidal surgery.

S-cortisol was measured every 6 h after the operation without any glucocorticoid replacement. We have follow-up on all patients, with a mean follow-up of 68 months.

Results: At the three-month follow-up, 16 patients (84 %) were in remission; at 12 months, 18 (95 %) were in remission and at the final follow-up (mean 68 months), 13 (68 %) were in remission.

Five-years recurrence rate was 26 %. The mean postoperative S-cortisol nadir was significantly lower in the group of patients in remission than in the non-remission group at 3 months, but there was no difference between those in long-term remission compared to those in long-term non-remission.

The optimal cut-off value for classifying 3-month remission was 74 nmol/l.

Conclusion: We achieved a 95 % 1-year remission rate with transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing’s disease in this series of consecutive patients. However, the 5-year recurrence rate was 26 %, showing the need for regular clinical and biochemical controls in this patient group.

The mean postoperative serum-cortisol nadir was significantly lower in patients in remission at 3 months compared to patients not in remission at 3 months, but a low postoperative S-cortisol did not predict long-term remission.

Author: Jon Ramm-Pettersen Helene Halvorsen Johan EvangPål Rønning Per Hol Jens Bollers levJon Berg-Johnsen Eirik Helseth
Credits/Source: BMC Endocrine Disorders 2015, 15:62

Published on: 2015-10-26

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Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day

Join us on Saturday, September 19, 2015

7th Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day
Saturday, September 19, 2015, 9:30 a.m.
Location:
Johns Hopkins Mt. Washington Conference Center
5801 Smith Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21209
map and directions

This is a free event, but seating is limited. Reserve your space now: Please R.S.V.P. by September 9, 2015 by email (preferred) to PituitaryDay@jhmi.edu  or by calling Alison Dimick at 410-955-3921.

Agenda

Time Topic Speaker(s)
9:30 – 9:55 AM Registration
9:55 – 10:00 AM Welcome and acknowledgements Roberto Salvatori, M.D.
10:00 – 10:25 AM Different kinds of pituitary adenomas: non-functioning, acromegaly, Cushing Gary Wand, M.D.
10:25 – 10:50 AM New and old medications for pituitary disease (acromegaly, Cushing, prolactinoma, hypopituitarism) Roberto Salvatori, M.D.
10:50 – 11:10 AM A patient’s story TBA
11:10 – 11:30 AM The eye and the pituitary gland: Why it is important to see the right doctor Dan Gold, D.O.
11:30 – 11:50 AM Surgery for pituitary tumors: Pictures from the operating room in acromegaly, Cushing, non-functioning masses Gary Gallia, M.D., Ph.D.
11:50 – 12:10 PM Radiation therapy for non-functioning ademomas, acromegaly or Cushing: Not so scary after all Lawrence Kleinberg, M.D.
12:10 – 12:30 PM Psychological issues in Cushing, acromegaly and other pituitary disease Tracy Vannorsdall, Ph.D.

 

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