Neurosurgical treatment of Cushing disease in pediatric patients: case series and review of literature

 2018 Nov 28. doi: 10.1007/s00381-018-4013-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

AIM:

Pituitary adenomas are rare in childhood in contrast with adults. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas account for Cushing’s disease (CD) which is the most common form of ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome (CS). Treatment strategies are generally based on data of adult CD patients, although some difficulties and differences exist in pediatric patients. The aim of this study is to share our experience of 10 children and adolescents with CD.

PATIENTS AND METHOD:

Medical records, images, and operative notes of 10 consecutive children and adolescents who underwent transsphenoidal surgery for CD between 1999 and 2014 in Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine were retrospectively reviewed. Mean age at operation was 14.8 ± 4.2 years (range 5-18). The mean length of symptoms was 24.2 months. The mean follow-up period was 11 years (range 4 to 19 years).

RESULTS:

Mean preoperative cortisol level was 23.435 μg/dl (range 8.81-59.8 μg/dl). Mean preoperative ACTH level was 57.358 μg/dl (range 28.9-139.9 μg/dl). MR images localized microadenoma in three patients (30%), macroadenoma in four patients (40%) in our series. Transsphenoidal microsurgery and endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery were performed in 8 and 2 patients respectively. Remission was provided in 8 patients (80%). Five patients (50%) met remission criteria after initial operations. Three patients (30%) underwent additional operations to meet remission criteria.

CONCLUSION:

Transsphenoidal surgery remains the mainstay therapy for CD in pediatric patients as well as adults. It is an effective treatment option with low rate of complications. Both endoscopic and microscopic approaches provide safe access to sella and satisfactory surgical results.

KEYWORDS:

Cushing’s disease; Endoscopic pituitary surgery; Pediatric; Transsphenoidal microsurgery

PMID:
30488233
DOI:
10.1007/s00381-018-4013-5

Full Text

Mutations in Two Genes, USP48 and BRAF, Linked to Cushing’s Disease

Mutations in USP48 and BRAF genes contribute to the overproduction of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) hormone by the pituitary gland and consequent development of Cushing’s disease, a study shows, linking these genes to the disease for a first time.

The study, “Identification of recurrent USP48 and BRAF mutations in Cushing’s disease,” published in the journal Nature Communications, also identified a possible treatment for patients with BRAF-related mutations.

Cushing’s disease is a condition characterized by excessive cortisol levels that, if left untreated, can lead to serious cardiovascular problems, infections, and mood disorders. It usually arises from benign pituitary tumors that produce too much of ACTH hormone, which in turn stimulates the adrenal glands to secrete cortisol.

It is still not clear why some people develop these tumors, but studies have pointed to mutations in the USP8 gene as a possible cause. They are present in 35%–62% of all tumor cases, and influence treatment response and long-term outcomes.

But major disease drivers in people whose tumors have no evidence of  USP8 mutations are unknown. Recognizing this gap, researchers in China examined tumor tissue samples from 22 patients with pituitary ademonas but a normal USP8 gene.

Their analysis revealed four genes that were recurrently mutated, including two — BRAF and USP48 — never before reported in this disease setting. Then, looking at 91 samples from patients, researchers found BRAF mutations in 17% of cases and USP48 mutations in 23% of patients.

These mutations were also found in patients with USP8-mutant pituitary tumors, but at a much lower rate — 5.1% for BRAF and 1.2% for USP48 mutations.

However, mutations in these two genes were not seen in patients with pituitary tumors producing other hormones, suggesting they are “unique genetic signatures of [ACTH-producing] adenomas,” the researchers wrote.

The team also found that BRAF and USP48 mutations activate signaling pathways that lead to the production of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), which is the precursor of ACTH.

“ACTH overproduction is a hallmark of Cushing’s disease and appears to be frequently induced by mutations in genes that tightly regulate POMC gene transcription in the pathogenesis of this disease,” investigators wrote.

Patients with BRAF and USP48 mutations had significantly higher levels of midnight plasma ACTH and midnight serum cortisol, compared to patients without these mutations. Tumor size, however, was similar among the two groups.

Interestingly, the team found that the BRAF inhibitor Zelboraf (vemurafenib) effectively reduced ACTH production in cells from ACTH-producing pituitary tumors. Zelboraf, marketed by Genentech, is approved in the U.S. and Europe to treat cancers with BRAF mutations, and findings suggest it may be a good therapeutic candidate for some people with Cushing’s disease.

“The mutational status of BRAFUSP8, and USP48 in corticotroph adenomas may be used in the future to characterize the molecular subtypes and guide targeted molecular therapy,” the researchers suggested.

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/11/20/mutations-in-usp48-braf-genes-contribute-for-cushings-disease-study-finds/

Pituitary Tumors Affect Patients’ Ability to Work, Reduce Quality of Life

Pituitary tumor conditions, such as Cushing’s disease, have a substantial effect on patients’ work capabilities and health-related quality of life, researchers from The Netherlands reported.

The study, “Work disability and its determinants in patients with pituitary tumor-related disease,” was published in the journal Pituitary.

Pituitary tumors, like those that cause Cushing’s disease, have significant effects on a patient’s physical, mental, and social health, all of which influence their work status and health-related quality of life. However, the effects of the disease on work status is relatively under-investigated, investigators report.

Here, researchers evaluated the work disability among patients who were treated for pituitary tumors in an attempt to understand the impact of disease diagnosis and treatment on their social participation and ability to maintain a paying job.

In their study, researchers examined 241 patients (61% women) with a median age of 53 years. The majority (27%) had non-functioning pituitary tumors, which do not produce excess hormones, but patients with acromegaly, Cushing’s disease, prolactinomas, and Rathke’s cleft cyst also were included.

Participants were asked to complete questionnaires to evaluate their health-related quality of life and disease-specific impact on their work capabilities. Each participant completed a set of five questionnaires.

Participants also reported their hormonal status and demographic data, including gender, age, education, and marital status. Specific information, such as disease diagnosis, treatment, and tumor type was obtained from their medical records.

Work status and productivity were assessed using two surveys, the Short-Form-Health and Labour Questionnaire (SF-HLQ) and the work role functioning questionnaire 2.0 (WRFQ).

SF-HLQ was used to obtain information on the participants’ employment and their work attendance. Employment was either paid or unpaid. (Participation in household chores was considered not having a paid job.)

WRFQ is a 27-question survey that determines work disability regarding being able to meet the productivity, physical, emotional, social, and flexible demands. A higher score indicates low self-perceived work disability.

Disease-specific mood problems, social and sexual functioning issues, negative perceptions due to illness, physical and cognitive difficulties, were assessed using a 26-item survey called Leiden Bother and Needs for Support Questionnaire for pituitary patients(LBNQ-Pituitary).

Overall, 28% of patients did not have a paid job, but the rates increased to 47% among those with Cushing’s disease. Low education, hormonal deficits, and being single were identified as the most common determinants of not having a paid job among this population.

Further analysis revealed that more patients with Cushing’s disease and acromegaly had undergone radiotherapy. They also had more hormonal deficits than others with different tumor types.

Overall, patients with a paid job reported working a median of 36 hours in one week and 41% of those patients missed work an average of 27 days during the previous year. Health-related problems during work also were reported by 39% with a paid job.

Finally, health-related quality of life was determined using two questionnaires: SF-36 and EQ-5D. The physical, mental, and emotional well being was measured with SF-36, while ED-5D measured the health outcome based on the impact of pain, mobility, self-care, usual activities, discomfort, and anxiety or depression. In both SF-36 and EQ-5D, a higher score indicates a better health status.

Statistical analysis revealed that the quality of life was significantly higher in patients with a job. Overall, patients with a paid job reported better health status and higher quality of life than those without a paid job.

Although 40% of the patients reported being bothered by health-related problems in the past year, only 12% sought the help of an occupational physician, the researchers reported.

“Work disability among patients with a pituitary tumor is substantial,” investigators said.

“The determinants and difficulties at work found in this study could potentially be used for further research, and we advise healthcare professionals to take these results into consideration in the clinical guidance of patients,” they concluded.

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/

FDA Approves High-resolution MRI, Better at Spotting Pituitary Tumors in Cushing’s Patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the clinical use of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner — the ultra-high-field 7T Terra MRI — with unprecedented resolution that allows for more reliable images of the brain.

The approach recently allowed the precise localization of a small tumor in the pituitary gland, which standard MRI had failed to spot, in a patient with Cushing’s disease.

So far, only one scanner of this kind exists in the U.S.. It was installed in February 2017 at the Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute (INI) of the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California (USC).

The new scanner has an increased magnetic field strength of 7 Tesla, which is more than four times that of conventional MRI. This property greatly improves the instrument’s signal-to-noise ratio, dramatically increasing the spatial resolution and contrast of its images so that scientists can visualize the human living brain in high-definition and with unprecedented detail.

The 7T Terra is ideal for high-resolution neuroimaging, exploration of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, and diagnosis and treatment of other brain diseases, a USC news story by Zara Greenbaum states.

Earlier this year, a report described the case of women with Cushing’s disease with a pituitary adenoma (slow-growing, benign tumor in the pituitary gland) that was possible to localize only with the new 7T MRI.

Based on laboratory analysis that revealed high levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone(ACTH) and cortisol, the doctors suspected a pituitary adenoma and recommended the patient for surgery. However, they ignored the precise location of the tumor, which failed to be detected by standard MRI scanners (1T and 3T).

    Two hours before surgery, the woman underwent a 7T MRI scan which finally identified with high precision the location of the adenoma, a very small tumor of 8 mm on the right side of the pituitary gland.

    “The 7T may save patients an invasive procedure. It also makes it easier for neurosurgeons to selectively remove a tumor without damaging surrounding areas,” said Gabriel Zada, MD, associate professor of neurological surgery at the Keck School.

    Since its arrival, the device has supported exploratory research into both healthy and diseased brains.

    Now the scanner’s advanced imaging technology can be used to help with diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of patients with neurological diseases, including Cushing’s disease.

    “This device, which has already made its mark as a powerful tool to advance research in the neurosciences, is now accessible to clinical populations in addition to researchers,” said Arthur W. Toga, PhD, provost professor and chair at the Keck School and director of the USC Stevens INI.

    “Clinicians across the university and beyond can now leverage all the benefits of increased spatial resolution to serve patients in need,” he said.

    Adapted from https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/11/06/fda-oks-high-resolution-mri-better-spotting-pituitary-tumor-cushings/

    Rare Case of Cushing’s Disease Diagnosed in 7-year-old Boy

    A recent case report describes a 7-year-old boy with Cushing’s disease who had an unusual clinical presentation, which significantly delayed his diagnosis.

    The study, “A variable course of Cushing’s disease in a 7 year old: diagnostic dilemma,” was published in the Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism.

    Rare in children and adolescents, Cushing’s disease refers to overproduction of cortisol caused by excessive adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion from a pituitary tumor. In pediatrics, early symptoms of excess cortisol include weight gain and delayed growth.

    Despite being extremely unlikely in children younger than 7, some cases of Cushing’s disease in infancy have been reported.

    “If undiagnosed or untreated it can lead to considerable morbidity and mortality, and the inability to detect a microadenoma [tumors smaller than 10 mm in diameter] on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can lead to a diagnostic dilemma leading to unnecessary delays in treatment initiation,” the researchers wrote.

    Researchers from the Indraprastha Apollo Hospital in New Delhi, India, described a 7-year-old boy who complained of excessive appetite and weight gain in the previous five months. The child weighed 46.8 kg, was 127 cm tall, and had a body mass index (BMI) of 29, indicating he was overweight.

    The child’s excess fat was mainly in his abdomen plus he had a round, red, puffy face, which are both common features of Cushing’s disease. He had no history of acute or chronic steroid intake, mood swings, sleep disorders, or issues with eyesight.

    Given his clinical presentation, the investigators suspected the boy had Cushing’s disease or pseudo-Cushing’s disease, which refers to situations where the overproduction of cortisol is caused by something unrelated to the disease, such as stress or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus.

    Biochemical testing showed the patient had high levels of cortisol, which remained unchanged after a dexamethasone suppression test. In addition, his levels of “bad” cholesterol, referring to low-density lipoprotein, were extremely elevated at 194 mg/dL, where a normal range is defined as less than 110 mg/dL.

    Imaging revealed no lesions in the pituitary gland.

    The boy was sent home with dietary recommendations. Eight weeks later, he had lost 4 kg, while his height remained the same; he also complained of headaches and various episodes of double vision.

    This confused the clinical team as hallmarks of Cushing’s disease include short stature and weight loss triggered by pharmacological therapy. Despite having lost weight, he did not take any medications to help him with it, plus the boy’s height was normal for his age.

    Nonetheless, the patient was complaining of neurological symptoms, suggesting progression of Cushing’s disease.

    An ophthalmologist did not observe anything abnormal with the child’s eyes that could explain his double vision episodes.

    A new series of tests revealed slightly elevated 24-hour urinary cortisol levels, decreased concentration of ACTH, and mildly increased cortisol levels after a two-day dexamethasone suppression test.

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a small microadenoma in the right lobe of the pituitary gland.

    Using Gamma Knife radiation therapy, a kind of high-precision radiation therapy, and surgery, doctors successfully removed the boy’s microadenoma. Six weeks post-procedure, his cortisol and ACTH concentrations returned to normal.

    “MRI findings of the pituitary may be inconclusive in the beginning of the disease process and should be borne in mind during further follow-up. In cases where a clear-cut diagnosis may be difficult, a diligent follow-up is required to ascertain the course of the disease and to make timely diagnosis,” the investigators concluded.

    From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/10/25/rare-case-cushings-disease-diagnosed-7-year-old-boy-case-study/

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