Cushing Disease: A Multidisciplinary Treatment Update

Share this info with your endo in case he/she missed it!

This activity is intended for endocrinologists, primary care physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists.

The goal of this activity is to review the diagnosis and treatment of Cushing disease from a multidisciplinary perspective.

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Outline the rationale for a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with Cushing disease
  2. Review the safety and efficacy of current management strategies for patients with Cushing disease
  3. Describe the diagnostic workup for Cushing disease and the reasons why timely diagnosis and treatment are important

Faculty and Disclosures

As an organization accredited by the ACCME, Medscape, LLC, requires everyone who is in a position to control the content of an education activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. The ACCME defines “relevant financial relationships” as financial relationships in any amount, occurring within the past 12 months, including financial relationships of a spouse or life partner, that could create a conflict of interest.

Medscape, LLC, encourages Authors to identify investigational products or off-label uses of products regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration, at first mention and where appropriate in the content.

Laurence Katznelson, MD

Professor of Medicine and Neurosurgery, Stanford University; Medical Director, Pituitary Center, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, California

Disclosure: Laurence Katznelson, MD, has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
Received grants for clinical research from: Corcept Therapeutics Inc.; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation

Dr Katznelson does not intend to discuss off-label uses of drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Dr Katznelson does not intend to discuss investigational drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics not approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Brooke Swearingen, MD

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, Harvard Medical School; Associate Visiting Neurosurgeon, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

Disclosure: Brooke Swearingen, MD, has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Served as an advisor or consultant for: Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation
Owns stock, stock options or bonds from: Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation; Pfizer Inc; Amgen Inc; Roche

Dr Swearingen does not intend to discuss off-label uses of drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Dr Swearingen does not intend to discuss investigational drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics not approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Nicholas Tritos, MD

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Staff, Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

Disclosure: Nicholas Tritos, MD, has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
Served as an advisor or consultant for: Corcept Therapeutics Inc; Pfizer Inc
Received grants for clinical research from: Pfizer Inc; Ipsen

Dr Tritos does intend to discuss off-label uses of drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Dr Tritos does not intend to discuss investigational drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics not approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Susan Cornell, PharmD, CDE

Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University-Chicago, Downers Grove, Illinois; Clinical Pharmacist/Certified Diabetes Educator, DuPage Community Clinic, Wheaton, Illinois

Disclosure: Susan Cornell, PharmD, CDE, has disclosed the following relevant relationships:
Served as a speaker or member of a speakers bureau for: Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute

Dr Cornell does intend to discuss off-label uses of drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Dr Cornell does not intend to discuss investigational drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics not approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Rita Pach, RN, MSN

Nurse, Johns Hopkins Pituitary Center, Baltimore, Maryland

Participation by Mrs Pach in the development of this product does not constitute or imply endorsement by the Johns Hopkins University or the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System.
Disclosure: Rita Pach, RN, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Mrs Pach does not intend to discuss off-label uses of drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Mrs Pach does not intend to discuss investigational drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics not approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Kristin M. Richardson

Group Scientific Director, Medscape, LLC

Disclosure: Kristin M. Richardson has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

David Modrak, PhD

Freelance editor, Montville, New Jersey

Disclosure: David Modrak, PhD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Nafeez Zawahir, MD

CME Clinical Director, Medscape, LLC

Disclosure: Nafeez Zawahir, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Laurie E. Scudder, DNP, NP

Nurse Planner, Continuing Professional Education Department, Medscape, LLC; Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Nursing and Allied Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC

Disclosure: Laurie E. Scudder, DNP, NP, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Instructions for Participation and Credit

There are no fees for participating in or receiving credit for this online educational activity. For information on applicability and acceptance of continuing education credit for this activity, please consult your professional licensing board.

This activity is designed to be completed within the time designated on the title page; physicians should claim only those credits that reflect the time actually spent in the activity. To successfully earn credit, participants must complete the activity online during the valid credit period that is noted on the title page. To receive AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™, you must receive a minimum score of 70% on the post-test.

Follow these steps to earn CME/CE credit*:

  1. Read the target audience, learning objectives, and author disclosures.
  2. Study the educational content online or printed out.
  3. Online, choose the best answer to each test question. To receive a certificate, you must receive a passing score as designated at the top of the test. We encourage you to complete the Activity Evaluation to provide feedback for future programming.

You may now view or print the certificate from your CME/CE Tracker. You may print the certificate but you cannot alter it. Credits will be tallied in your CME/CE Tracker and archived for 6 years; at any point within this time period you can print out the tally as well as the certificates from the CME/CE Tracker.

*The credit that you receive is based on your user profile.

Continue to activity: http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/806559

Research on Cushing’s Disease Presented at ENDO 2013

endo-chart

Researchers at PHAR, in conjunction with experts from Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, presented the results of several studies on Cushing’s disease at the Endocrine Society’s 95th Annual Meeting on June 19th, 2013.

Cushing’s disease, a pituitary disorder, is poorly studied because of its rarity. The PHAR research team reported on the incidence, treatment patterns, and annual economic burden associated with the disease–topics on which very little was previously known.

The three posters presented at ENDO can be viewed by clicking the links below:

Incidence of Cushing’s Disease in the United States

Real-World Treatment Patterns in Cushing’s Disease Patients in Two Large US Nationwide Databases: Application of a Novel, Graphical Methodology

Annual Economic Burden Associated with Cushing’s Disease in the United States

Help Grow the Rare Disease Congressional Caucus

Take Action . Rare Disease Legislative Advocates at 10.56.06 AM

The Rare Disease Congressional Caucus will help bring public and Congressional awareness to the unique needs of the rare disease community – patients, physicians, scientists, and industry, and create opportunities to address roadblocks in access to and development of crucial treatments.  The Caucus will give a permanent voice to the rare disease community on Capitol Hill.  Working together, we can find solutions that turn hope into treatments.

The screen shot above shows what happens when you fill in the little text box with information about your disease.  The rest is automatically generated.

Please take 3 minutes to ask your Member of Congress to join the Rare Disease Caucus at http://bit.ly/RareAlert.

English: Capitol Hill

English: Capitol Hill (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s easy – the Action Center has a draft letter that will automatically be sent to your Member of Congress – just put in your name and address & click send.  We also encourage you to personalize the letter to share information about your specific disease.  If your Congress Member is already on the Caucus, the letter will automatically populate as a thank you letter instead – these are just as important to send!

It can take up to 10 letters from constituents for a Member to respond so please share this Action Alert with your friends, family, facebook groups, Twitter, blogs & colleagues.

Join our Facebook event & invite your friends:   http://on.fb.me/17Mlpj

In the US? Ask your Member of Congress to join the Rare Disease Congressional Caucus

Help us strengthen the rare disease community’s voice on Capitol Hill!  Please take 3 minutes to ask your Member of Congress to join the Rare Disease Caucus at http://bit.ly/RareAlert.

 

It’s easy – the Action Center has a draft letter that will automatically be sent to your Member of Congress – just put in your name and address & click send.  We also encourage you to personalize the letter to share information about your specific disease.  If your Congress Member is already on the Caucus, the letter will automatically populate as a thank you letter instead – these are just as important to send!

 

It can take up to 10 letters from constituents for a Member to respond so please share this Action Alert with your friends, family & colleagues.  Join our Facebook event & invite your friends:   http://on.fb.me/17Mlpjg

 

The Rare Disease Congressional Caucus will help bring public and Congressional awareness to the unique needs of the rare disease community – patients, physicians, scientists, and industry, and create opportunities to address roadblocks in access to and development of crucial treatments.  The Caucus will give a permanent voice to the rare disease community on Capitol Hill.  Working together, we can find solutions that turn hope into treatments.

Case study shows chronic marijuana use associated with hypopituitarism

PHOENIX — Results of a case study presented here at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists 22nd Scientific and Clinical Congress demonstrate that smoking marijuana may result in serious endocrine complications.

Hormone feedback cycles

Hormone feedback cycles (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“We really feel that the evidence to-date shows this is a much more serious health problem than we’ve given credit to,” Pinsker said during a press conference. “Marijuana’s always been laughed off: ‘it’s a kid’s drug; they’ll outgrow it.’ In certain communities, it’s so common that people look at it as if they’re having a glass of beer. I think it’s time that physicians start having their antenna up for all the difficulties that come with this drug.”

The patient presented to the emergency department with dyspnea on exertion, increasing fatigue and loss of libido with no previous radiation exposure or head trauma. He had bibasilar rales, gynecomastia and bilateral atrophied testis.

His hormonal evaluation demonstrated low Luteinizing Hormone (0.2 mIU/mL); FSH (1.8 mIU/mL) and testosterone (22 ng/dL), as well as high prolactin (53.3 ng/mL).

Additionally, the patient had ACTH of 6 pg/mL and cortisol of 6.4 ug/dL at 0 minutes and 9.3 ug/dL at 60 minutes following cosyntropin administration.

Further labs revealed low total T3 (30 ng/dL); high T3 resin reuptake (49%); low total T4 (3.94 ng/dL); normal free T4 (0.97 ng/dL) and low TSH (0.22 uIU/mL). Growth hormone was within normal range (5.0 ng/mL) and IGF-I was low (75 ng/mL; Z-score of -1.3). An MRI revealed a slightly enlarged protuberant pituitary gland, but no identified mass lesion.

After being started on cortisone 25 mg in the morning and 12.5 mg at bedtime, as well as levothyroxine 25 mcg daily, the patient’s fatigue and edema improved significantly, according to the abstract.

In this case, severe hypopituitarism occurred from interference between THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana which has the ability to alter neural transmitters in the hypothalamus, and hypothalamic function.

Additionally, studies show that marijuana impairs the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRh), resulting in reduced production of testosterone.

Other symptoms seen with prolonged use include cognitive decline in school children and older people, according to Pinsker. “The public will become more attuned to looking for these things. We’re going to have what we call a surveillance bias and we’re going to start discovering that it’s a lot higher than we gave it credit for, both because of increased use and because we’re going to be looking for it.”

The authors conclude that, as many states consider the legalization of marijuana, more study should be conducted with regard to the effects of chronic use of the drug on the endocrine system.

“Of course this is one case report, but I think it should alert further research that needs to be done, “ said Pinsker. “Something prospectively should be done to map this out more scientifically, but this would be difficult in what, to-date, has been an illegal substance.”

For more information:

Pinsker R. Abstract #825. Presented at: the AACE Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress; May 1-5, 2013; Phoenix.

Disclosure: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

 From Healio.com
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