The burden of Cushing’s disease: clinical and health-related quality of life aspects


Thanks to Robin Ess for the easy to read chart!

Abstract

Objective Cushing’s disease (CD) is a rare endocrine disorder characterized by excess secretion of ACTH due to a pituitary adenoma. Current treatment options are limited and may pose additional risks. A literature review was conducted to assess the holistic burden of CD.

Design Studies published in English were evaluated to address questions regarding the epidemiology of CD, time to diagnosis, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), treatment outcomes, mortality, prevalence of comorbidities at diagnosis, and reversibility of comorbidities following the treatment.

Methods A two-stage literature search was performed in Medline, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index, using keywords related to the epidemiology, treatment, and outcomes of CD: i) articles published from 2000 to 2012 were identified and ii) an additional hand search (all years) was conducted on the basis of bibliography of identified articles.

Results At the time of diagnosis, 58–85% of patients have hypertension, 32–41% are obese, 20–47% have diabetes mellitus, 50–81% have major depression, 31–50% have osteoporosis, and 38–71% have dyslipidemia. Remission rates following transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) are high when performed by expert pituitary surgeons (rates of 65–90%), but the potential for relapse remains (rates of 5–36%). Although some complications can be partially reversed, time to reversal can take years. The HRQoL of patients with CD also remains severely compromised after remission.

Conclusions These findings highlight the significant burden associated with CD. As current treatment options may not fully reverse the burden of chronic hypercortisolism, there is a need for both improved diagnostic tools to reduce the time to diagnosis and effective therapy, particularly a targeted medical therapy.

Introduction

Cushing’s disease (CD) is a rare condition caused by a pituitary adenoma that secretes excess ACTH (1), which promotes excess cortisol production from the adrenal glands. Excess cortisol induces a clinical phenotype that harbors all components of the metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, as well as muscle weakness, hirsutism, increased bruisability, psychological dysfunction, and osteoporosis (1234567891011).

Patients with CD experience a significant clinical burden due to comorbidities, increased mortality, and impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL) due to prolonged exposure to elevated cortisol levels (3511121314151617181920). In particular, patients with CD often experience severe fatigue and weakness, physical changes, emotional instability, depression, and cognitive impairments, which have a profound impact on daily life (1321).

Although there have been several consensus statements published recently on the definition of remission, diagnosis, and the management of CD, the severity and diversity of the clinical scenario and associated morbidities continue to present a management challenge (12223). Additionally, there is recent evidence of persistent deleterious effects after remission, most notably persistent elevated cardiovascular risk (322). The main objective of the current literature review is to describe the current burden of the disease and to summarize data on specific aspects of this burden, which underscores the need for improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

Materials and methods

Available literature were evaluated to address questions regarding the epidemiology of CD, time to diagnosis, mortality, prevalence of comorbidities at diagnosis, reversibility of comorbidities after treatment (in particular, after disease remission), outcomes and complications of current treatment options, and HRQoL associated with CD and interventions.

The literature search was performed in Medline, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index, using keywords related to the epidemiology, treatment, and outcomes of CD. It was conducted in two stages: i) articles published between 2000 and 2012 were identified through a PubMed search using the following keywords: CD, incidence, prevalence, mortality, treatment, remission, cure, excess cortisol, outcomes, cost, QoL, morbidities, transsphenoidal surgery (TSS), adrenalectomy, radiotherapy, steroidogenesis inhibitors, ketoconazole, mitotane, aminoglutethimide, etomidate, metyrapone, pasireotide, and cortisol receptor antagonists; and ii) an additional hand search was conducted on the basis of the bibliographies of identified articles. All studies that provided data (regardless of publication year) related to these research questions were retained.

Definitions

Different criteria for defining the remission of hypercortisolism have been proposed, ranging from the occurrence of definitive or transient postoperative hypocortisolemia to the adequate suppression of cortisol after dexamethasone administration. According to a recent consensus statement (23), persistent postoperative morning serum cortisol levels of <2 μg/dl (∼50 nmol/l) are associated with remission and a low recurrence rate of ∼10% at 10 years. Persistent serum cortisol levels above 5 μg/dl (∼140 nmol/l) for up to 6 weeks following surgery require further evaluation. When serum cortisol levels are between 2 and 5 μg/dl, the patient can be considered in remission and can be observed without additional treatment for CD. A subset of patients can even develop complete adrenal insufficiency (serum cortisol levels below 2 μg/dl (∼50 nmol/l)) up to 12 weeks postsurgery (2425). Therefore, repeated evaluation in the early postoperative period is recommended. However, long-term follow-up is necessary for all patients because no single cortisol cutoff value excludes those who later experience disease recurrence, and up to 25% of patients develop a recurrent adenoma within 10 years after surgery (262728).

Results

Incidence and prevalence of CD

Although epidemiologic data on CD are limited, several population-based studies indicate an incidence of 1.2–2.4 per million (1419) and the prevalence of diagnosed cases to be ∼39 per million population (14). Lindholm et al(19) used the case definition as either the presence of a corticotroph adenoma or remission after neurosurgery, which yielded an estimated incidence rate of 1.2–1.7 per million per year. Etxabe & Vazquez (14) reported an incidence of 2.4 per million in Vizcaya, Spain. A large-scale retrospective survey carried out in New Zealand by Bolland et al(29) found the approximate prevalence of all forms of Cushing’s syndrome (CS) (the majority of these cases were of pituitary origin) to be 79 per million and the incidence to be 1.8 per million per year. Differences in epidemiologic estimates may be attributable to varying case definitions (for instance, the study by Lindholm excluded cases in which the adenoma could not be localized or those that could not achieve remission from surgery), geographical differences, and temporal effects. The prevalence of CD may be underestimated due to unrecognized patients with mild symptoms and patients with a cyclic form of CD (30).

Time to diagnosis

Data on the time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis are also limited. In a prospective study by Flitsch et al(31) of 48 patients with pituitary adenomas, including 19 who had ACTH-secreting adenomas causing CD, the reported time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 4.3 years. A study by Martinez Ruiz et al(32), which was based on only four pediatric CD patients, reported the time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis as ranging from 2.5 to 5 years. Etxabe & Vazquez (14) estimated that the average time from onset of clinical symptoms to diagnosis in 49 CD patients was 45.8±2.7 months (6–144 months), thus 3.8 years. This is corroborated by the findings from a Belgian cross-sectional study on pituitary adenomas including CD, which estimated that patients experienced symptoms for an average of 45 months before diagnosis (33). However, the reliability and generalizability of these data are limited by small sample sizes and the retrospective nature of the studies. Indeed, the New Zealand data from Bolland et al(29) report that on presentation, patients experienced symptoms for a median of 2.0 years (but ranging up to 20 years) before diagnosis. On the basis of data from the prospective European Registry on Cushing’s syndrome (ERCUSYN) (total number of patients=481, of whom 66% of patients had CD), median delay in diagnosis was 2 years (34).

Mortality in patients with CD

Mortality in patients with CD has been analyzed in several small studies, with overall rates reported as standardized mortality ratio (SMR) ranging from 1.7 to 4.8 (Table 1) (14151719). In studies in which mortality was assessed among those in remission and those with persistent disease separately, patients with persistent hypercortisolemia consistently had the highest mortality risk (15193536). In addition, TSS as a first-line treatment has been an important advance as high remission rates after initial surgery have been accompanied by mortality rates that mirror those observed in the general population (173537). In a case series from the UK, it was found that the majority of deaths occurred before 1985, which was before TSS was employed as the routine first-line treatment at the center (36). In a recent retrospective study, 80 patients undergoing TSS for CD between 1988 and 2009 were evaluated, and long-term cure (defined as ongoing absence of hypercortisolism at last follow-up) was reported in 72% of patients. However, overall elevated mortality persisted in patients (SMR 3.17 (95% CI: 1.70–5.43)), including those who achieved ‘cure’ (SMR 2.47 (95% CI: 0.80–5.77)), although even higher mortality was seen in those with postoperative recurrence/persistent disease (SMR 4.12 (95% CI: 1.12–10.54) (38). Additionally, a nationwide, retrospective study in New Zealand reported significant persistently increased mortality both in macro- and microadenomas (SMR 3.5 (1.3–7.8) and 3.2 (2.0–4.8) respectively), despite long-term biochemical remission rates of 93 and 91% of patients, respectively (29).

Read more at http://m.eje-online.org/content/167/3/311.full

Cushing’s Testing at NIH

Rank Status Study
1 Recruiting Study to Evaluate CORT125134 in Patients With Cushing’s Syndrome

Condition: Cushing’s Syndrome
Intervention: Drug: CORT125134
2 Recruiting Cushing’s Disease Complications

Condition: Cushing’s Disease
Intervention: Other: Exams and questionnaires
3 Recruiting The Accuracy of Late Night Urinary Free Cortisol/Creatinine and Hair Cortisol in Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnosis

Condition: Cushing Syndrome
Intervention:
4 Recruiting Treatment for Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome

Condition: Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome
Intervention: Drug: COR-003
5 Recruiting Saliva Cortisol Measurement as a Screening Test for Suspicious Cushings Syndrome in Children.

Condition: Cushings Syndrome
Intervention: Other: Children refered to the obesity clinic
6 Recruiting Safety and Efficacy of LCI699 for the Treatment of Patients With Cushing’s Disease

Condition: Cushing’s Disease
Intervention: Drug: LCI699
7 Recruiting Treatment of Cushing’s Disease With R-roscovitine

Condition: Cushings Disease
Intervention: Drug: R-roscovitine
8 Recruiting A Study of ATR-101 for the Treatment of Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome

Condition: Cushing Syndrome
Interventions: Drug: ATR-101;   Drug: Placebos
9 Recruiting Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, Octreotide and F-DOPA PET Imaging in Patients With Ectopic Cushing Syndrome

Condition: Cushing Syndrome
Interventions: Drug: F-DOPA PET Scan;   Drug: Mifepristone;   Drug: Ga-DOTATATE;   Drug: Octreoscan;   Other: CT, MRI
10 Not yet recruiting Endocrine Cardiomyopathy in Cushing Syndrome: Response to Cyclic GMP PDE5 inhibitOrs

Condition: Cushing’s Syndrome Cardiomyopathy
Intervention: Drug: Tadalafil
11 Recruiting Long-term Beneficial Metabolic Effects of Adrenalectomy in Subclinical Cushing’s Syndrome of Adrenal Incidentaloma

Condition: Cushing Syndrome
Intervention: Procedure: surgery
12 Recruiting Long Term Safety and Efficacy of Pasireotide s.c. in Patients With Cushing’s Disease

Condition: Cushings Disease
Intervention: Drug: SOM230
13 Recruiting New Imaging Techniques in the Evaluation of Patients With Ectopic Cushing Syndrome

Condition: Cushing Syndrome
Interventions: Drug: Pentetreotide;   Drug: 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose;   Drug: (18F)-L-3,4-dihydroxyophenylalanine (18F-DOPA)
14 Not yet recruiting Targeting Iatrogenic Cushing’s Syndrome With 11β-hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Inhibition

Condition: Iatrogenic Cushing’s Disease
Interventions: Drug: AZD4017 and prednisolone;   Drug: Placebo Oral Tablet and prednisolone
15 Not yet recruiting Assessment of Persistent Cognitive Impairment After Cure of Cushing’s Disease

Condition: Cushing’s Disease
Intervention: Device: Virtual radial task in 3D
16 Recruiting Biomarker Expression in Patients With ACTH-Dependent Cushing’s Syndrome Before and After Surgery

Condition: Cushing’s Syndrome
Intervention:
17 Recruiting Efficacy and Safety Evaluation of Osilodrostat in Cushing’s Disease

Condition: Cushing’s Disease
Interventions: Drug: osilodrostat;   Drug: osilodrostat Placebo
18 Recruiting Effects of Metyrapone in Patients With Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome

Condition: Cushing’s Syndrome
Intervention: Drug: metyrapone
19 Recruiting Adrenal Venous Sampling in Patients With Overt or Subclinical Cushings Syndrome, and Bilateral Adrenal Tumors

Condition: Cushing Syndrome
Intervention: Radiation: Adrenal venous sampling
20 Recruiting Glycemic Fluctuations in Newly Diagnosed Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma and Cushing Syndrome Subjects

Condition: Pituitary Adenoma
Intervention: Device: continuous glucose monitoring
Rank Status Study
21 Recruiting Targeted Therapy With Gefitinib in Patients With USP8-mutated Cushing’s Disease

Conditions: Cushing’s Disease;   Corticotrophin Adenoma
Intervention: Drug: Gefitinib
22 Recruiting Cardiac Steatosis in Cushing’s Syndrome

Conditions: Endocrine System Disease;   Cardiovascular Imaging
Intervention: Other: 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and CMRI
23 Recruiting Study of Management of Pasireotide-induced Hyperglycemia in Adult Patients With Cushing’s Disease or Acromegaly

Conditions: Cushing’s Disease;   Acromegaly
Interventions: Drug: Pasireotide s.c.;   Drug: Sitagliptin;   Drug: Liraglutide;   Drug: Insulin;   Drug: Pasireotide LAR;   Drug: Metformin
24 Recruiting Study of Efficacy and Safety of Osilodrostat in Cushing’s Syndrome

Conditions: Cushing’s Syndrome;   Ectopic Corticotropin Syndrome;   Adrenal Adenoma;   Adrenal Carcinoma;   AIMAH;   PPNAD
Intervention: Drug: Osilodrostat
25 Recruiting Effects of Hormone Stimulation on Brain Scans for Cushing s Disease

Condition: Pituitary Neoplasm
Intervention: Drug: Acthrel
26 Recruiting Does Serum-DXM Increase Diagnostic Accuracy of the Overnight DXM Suppression Test in the Work-up of Cushing’s Syndrome?

Conditions: Cushing’s Syndrome;   Adrenal Incidentalomas;   Alcoholism;   Obesity
Intervention:
27 Recruiting Adrenalectomy Versus Follow-up in Patients With Subclinical Cushings Syndrome

Condition: Adrenal Tumour With Mild Hypercortisolism
Intervention: Procedure: Adrenalectomy
28 Recruiting Study of Adrenalectomy Versus Observation for Subclinical Hypercortisolism

Conditions: Hypercortisolism;   Cushing Syndrome
Interventions: Procedure: Adrenalectomy;   Other: Observation
29 Not yet recruiting Dynamic Hormone Diagnostics in Endocrine Disease

Conditions: Adrenal Insufficiency;   Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia;   Cushing Syndrome;   Growth Hormone Deficiency;   Acromegaly;   Primary Hyperaldosteronism
Intervention: Other: 27 hour subcutaneous fluid sampling
30 Recruiting An Investigation of Pituitary Tumors and Related Hypothalmic Disorders

Conditions: Abnormalities;   Craniopharyngioma;   Cushing’s Syndrome;   Endocrine Disease;   Pituitary Neoplasm
Intervention:
31 Recruiting Ga-68-DOTATOC -PET in the Management of Pituitary Tumours

Condition: Pituitary Tumours
Intervention: Procedure: Gallium-68 DOTATOC PET
32 Recruiting Efficacy of Mifepristone in Males With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Conditions: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus;   Insulin Resistance
Interventions: Drug: Mifepristone 600 mg daily;   Drug: Placebo
33 Recruiting Targeted Therapy With Lapatinib in Patients With Recurrent Pituitary Tumors Resistant to Standard Therapy

Conditions: Pituitary Adenomas;   Prolactinomas
Intervention: Drug: Lapatinib
34 Recruiting Mutations of Glucocorticoid Receptor in Bilateral Adrenal Hyperplasia

Condition: General Glucocorticoid Resistance
Intervention: Genetic: blood collection for mutation characterization
35 Recruiting Defining the Genetic Basis for the Development of Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease (PPNAD) and the Carney Complex

Conditions: Cushing’s Syndrome;   Hereditary Neoplastic Syndrome;   Lentigo;   Neoplasm;   Testicular Neoplasm
Intervention:
36 Not yet recruiting Reduction by Pasireotide of the Effluent Volume in High-output Enterostomy in Patients Refractory to Usual Medical Treatment

Condition: Enterostomy
Interventions: Drug: Pasireotide;   Drug: Placebo
37 Recruiting Mifepristone for Breast Cancer Patients With Higher Levels of Progesterone Receptor Isoform A Than Isoform B.

Condition: Breast Cancer
Intervention: Drug: Mifepristone
38 Recruiting SOM230 Ectopic ACTH-producing Tumors

Condition: Ectopic ACTH Syndrome
Intervention: Drug: Pasireotide
39 Recruiting Decreasing Rates of Intraurethral Catheterization Postoperatively in Spine Surgery

Condition: Post-operative Urinary Retention
Interventions: Drug: Tamsulosin;   Drug: Placebo
40 Recruiting Adrenal Tumors – Pathogenesis and Therapy

Conditions: Adrenal Tumors;   Adrenocortical Carcinoma;   Cushing Syndrome;   Conn Syndrome;   Pheochromocytoma
Intervention:

Diagnosis and Differential Diagnosis of Cushing’s Syndrome

D. Lynn Loriaux, M.D., Ph.D.

N Engl J Med 2017; 376:1451-1459April 13, 2017DOI: 10.1056/NEJMra1505550

More than a century ago, Harvey Cushing introduced the term “pluriglandular syndrome” to describe a disorder characterized by rapid development of central obesity, arterial hypertension, proximal muscle weakness, diabetes mellitus, oligomenorrhea, hirsutism, thin skin, and ecchymoses.1 Cushing knew that this syndrome was associated with adrenal cancer,2 and he suspected that some cases might have a pituitary component.

On September 6, 1911, he performed a craniotomy on one of his patients (referred to as Case XLV) but found no pituitary tumor.3 In his description of the case, he goes on to say that “we may perchance be on the way toward the recognition of the consequences of hyperadrenalism.”2 With time, it became clear that the disorder could be caused by small basophilic adenomas of the pituitary gland,4 and the pluriglandular syndrome became known as Cushing’s syndrome.

Fuller Albright provided the next conceptual advance in an extraordinary report, published in the first volume of the Laurentian Hormone Conference, “The Effects of Hormones on Osteogenesis in Man”5:

It has been our concept that protoplasm in general, like the protoplasmic matrix of bone, is constantly being anabolized and catabolized at one and the same time; a factor which increases catabolism would lead to very much the same net result as a factor which inhibits anabolism, but there would be some differences; it is my belief that the “S” hormone [cortisol] is anti-anabolic rather than catabolic. . . . The anti-anabolism . . . is contrasted with the increased anabolism due to an excess of the “N” hormone [testosterone] in the adreno-genital syndrome. This anti-anabolism of protoplasm in Cushing’s syndrome accounts for not only the osteoporosis, but the muscular weakness, the thin skin, probably the easy bruisability, and possibly the atrophy of the lymphoid tissues and thymus.

Nonetheless, in the intervening years, the physical examination of patients suspected to have glucocorticoid excess focused on the anabolic changes, essentially to the exclusion of the antianabolic changes. With the rapid increase in the rate of obesity in the general population, Cushing’s syndrome can no longer be reliably separated from the metabolic syndrome of simple obesity on the basis of anabolic signs alone. However, the antianabolic changes in Cushing’s syndrome are very effective in making this distinction. This review focuses on the problems introduced into the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome by the obesity epidemic and on ways to alter the traditional approach, using the antianabolic changes of excess cortisol to separate patients with Cushing’s syndrome from obese patients with the insulin-resistant metabolic syndrome.

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION

Andreas Vesalius (1514–1564) published his transformational work on human anatomy, De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem, in 1543. It is the book that corrected many of Galen’s anatomical errors. The book was met with considerable hostility. As an example, Jacobus Sylvius (Jacques Dubois, 1478–1555), the world’s leading anatomist at the time and Vesalius’s former mentor, on being asked his opinion of the work, replied, “Galen is not wrong. It is man that has changed, and not for the better.”6 This was not true then, but it is true now.

Approximately one third of the U.S. population is obese. The worldwide prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among obese persons is conservatively estimated at 10%; that is, approximately 12 million people have the obesity-related metabolic syndrome.7,8 The clinical picture of this syndrome is almost the same as that of Cushing’s syndrome.9,10 The prevalence of undiagnosed Cushing’s syndrome is about 75 cases per 1 million population, or 24,000 affected persons. On the basis of these prevalence estimates, the chance that a person with obesity, hypertension, hirsutism, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia has Cushing’s syndrome is about 1 in 500. In Harvey Cushing’s era, when obesity was rare, making the diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome was the most certain aspect of the management of this disorder. Today, making the diagnosis is the least certain aspect in the care of patients with Cushing’s syndrome.

The metabolic syndrome caused by glucocorticoid hypersecretion can be differentiated from the obesity-associated metabolic syndrome with the use of a careful assessment of Albright’s antianabolic effects of cortisol. These effects — osteopenia, thin skin, and ecchymoses — are present in patients with Cushing’s syndrome but not in patients with simple obesity.

Patients in whom osteoporosis is diagnosed radiographically are more likely to have Cushing’s syndrome than those who do not have osteoporosis, with a positive likelihood ratio of 11.11-13 Today, a z score of −2 at the lumbar spine supports this criterion. Skinfold thickness is conveniently measured with an electrocardiographic caliper that has the points dulled with a sharpening stone and the screws tightened so that the gap is maintained when the caliper is removed from the skinfold. The skin over the proximal phalanx of the middle finger of the nondominant hand is commonly used for this measurement

 

(Figure 1 FIGURE 1Measurement of Skinfold Thickness.). A thickness of less than 2 mm is considered to be thin skin. Patients who have thin skin are more likely to have Cushing’s syndrome, with a positive likelihood ratio of 116

 

(Figure 2 FIGURE 2 Comparison of Skinfold Thickness in Patients with Cushing’s Syndrome and Those with Other Conditions Related to Insulin Resistance.).13-15 Finally, patients who have three or more ecchymoses that are larger than 1 cm in diameter and not associated with trauma such as venipuncture are more likely to have Cushing’s syndrome than are patients without such findings, with a positive likelihood ratio of 4.13,16

If we know the prevalence of undiagnosed Cushing’s syndrome in the population of persons with the obesity-related metabolic syndrome, we can begin to calculate the probability that a person has Cushing’s syndrome, using the likelihood ratios for the antianabolic features observed on physical examination. Likelihood ratios can be converted into probabilities with the use of Bayes’ theorem. This conversion is markedly facilitated by the Fagan nomogram for this purpose.17

The prevalence of undiagnosed Cushing’s syndrome is not known, but it can be estimated. Two persons per 1 million population die from adrenal cancer every year.18 The current life span for patients with adrenocortical carcinoma, after diagnosis, is between 2 and 4 years.19,20 Allowing 3 years to make the diagnosis, the prevalence of undiagnosed Cushing’s syndrome is 6 cases per million. In most case series of Cushing’s syndrome, an average of 8% of patients have adrenal carcinoma.21 If 6 per million is 8% of the group, the total Cushing’s syndrome group is 75 persons per million, or 24,000 persons. If all 24,000 patients are included in the metabolic syndrome group, comprising 12 million people, the prevalence of Cushing’s syndrome is 0.002, or 0.2%. With a probability of 0.2% and a likelihood ratio of 116 for thin skin, 18 for osteopenia, and 4 for ecchymoses, the probability that a patient with these three findings has Cushing’s syndrome is 95%.

URINARY FREE CORTISOL

The diagnosis of all endocrine diseases requires a clinical presentation that is compatible with the disease, as well as identification of the pathophysiological cause. An assessment for excess glucocorticoid effects can be made by measuring the 24-hour urinary free cortisol level.22 There are two kinds of free cortisol: plasma protein-unbound cortisol and cortisol unconjugated to sulfuric or hyaluronic acid. Protein-unbound cortisol is filtered in the glomerulus and then reabsorbed in the collecting system. About 3% of filtered cortisol ends up in the urine. This free cortisol in the urine is unconjugated. Thus, the urinary free cortisol level is a direct reflection of the free, bioactive cortisol level in plasma. The free cortisol level is quantified in a 24-hour urine sample by averaging the increased secretion of cortisol in the morning and the decreased secretion in the afternoon and at night. Urinary creatinine is also measured to determine whether the collection is complete. Creatinine levels of less than 1.5 g per day for men and less than 1 g per day for women indicate incomplete collection, and the test should be repeated in patients with these levels.

Unconjugated cortisol can be extracted directly from urine with a nonpolar lipid solvent. After extraction, the cortisol is purified by means of high-pressure liquid chromatography and then quantified with a binding assay, usually radioimmunoassay. Free cortisol also can be quantitated directly by means of mass spectroscopy. The urinary free cortisol assay of choice uses high-pressure liquid chromatographic separation followed by mass spectrometric quantitation.23 With the use of this assay, the urinary free cortisol level in healthy adults ranges from 8 to 51 μg per 24 hours (mean [±SD], 23±8). Clinical depression increases urinary free cortisol excretion, and most studies show that the level of urinary free cortisol ranges from 10 to 60 μg per day in patients with typical clinical signs and symptoms of depression. If we use 60 μg per day as the cutoff between normal values (<60 μg per day) and elevated values (≥60 μg per day), urinary free cortisol excretion of 62 μg per day or more has a positive likelihood ratio of 11.24 Thus, in a patient presenting with obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and hirsutism who has thin skin, osteopenia, ecchymoses, and an elevated urinary free cortisol level, the probability of Cushing’s syndrome is 1 (100%). For such patients, the clinician should move directly to a differential diagnostic evaluation.

DEXAMETHASONE-SUPPRESSION TEST

The dexamethasone-suppression test is commonly used in the diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome. This test was developed by Grant Liddle in the early 1960s as a differential diagnostic test to separate corticotropin-dependent from corticotropin-independent Cushing’s syndrome. This is now done by measuring the plasma corticotropin level. Unfortunately, dexamethasone suppression has continued to be used as a screening test for Cushing’s syndrome.

The control group for this test comprises patients with obesity and depression in whom cortisol secretion is not suppressed in response to an oral dose of 1 mg of dexamethasone at midnight. Of the current U.S. population of 360 million people, approximately one third (120 million people) are obese. Of those who are obese, 10% (12 million people) have depression. In half these patients (6 million people), the plasma cortisol level will not be suppressed in response to a dexamethasone challenge. On the basis of my estimate of the current prevalence of undiagnosed Cushing’s syndrome (24,000 cases) and the estimate of the at-risk population (6 million persons), the positive predictive value of the dexamethasone-suppression test is only 0.4%. Thus, this test should not influence what the physician does next and should no longer be used for this purpose.

OUTLIERS

For patients with convincing evidence of Cushing’s syndrome on physical examination and an elevated 24-hour urinary free cortisol level, the differential diagnostic process outlined below should be initiated. However, a small group of patients will not meet these criteria.

Some patients have a strongly positive physical examination but low or zero urinary free cortisol excretion. Plasma corticotropin levels are suppressed in these patients. These patients are receiving exogenous glucocorticoids. The glucocorticoid must be identified, and a plan must be made for its discontinuation. Sometimes the glucocorticoid is being given by proxy (e.g., by a parent to a child), and no history of glucocorticoid administration can be found. Nevertheless, the glucocorticoid must be identified and discontinued.

Other patients have few or no clinical signs of Cushing’s syndrome but do have elevated urinary free cortisol excretion. Plasma corticotropin is measurable in these patients. They are usually identified during an evaluation for arterial hypertension. All such patients should undergo inferior petrosal sinus sampling to determine the source of corticotropin secretion. Ectopic sources are almost always neoplastic and are usually in the chest.25 Patients with eutopic secretion usually have the syndrome of generalized glucocorticoid resistance.26

Finally, a few patients have convincing findings on physical examination coupled with a normal urinary free cortisol level. In such cases, the clinician should make sure that urinary free cortisol is being measured with high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, that renal function is normal, and that the collections are complete. “Periodic” Cushing’s syndrome must be ruled out by measuring urinary free cortisol frequently over the course of a month.27 If these efforts fail, the patient should be followed for a year, with urinary free cortisol measurements performed frequently. No additional tests should be performed until the situation is sorted out. More tests would be likely to lead to an unnecessary surgical procedure.

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

The differential diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome is shown in Figure 3

FIGURE 3Differential Diagnosis of Cushing’s Syndrome.. If plasma corticotropin is measurable, the disease process is corticotropin-dependent. If corticotropin is not measurable, the process is corticotropin-independent.

Corticotropin-dependent causes of Cushing’s syndrome are divided into those in which the corticotropin comes from the pituitary (eutopic causes) and those in which the corticotropin comes from elsewhere (ectopic causes). This differentiation is made with the measurement of corticotropin in inferior petrosal sinus plasma and the simultaneous measurement of corticotropin in peripheral (antecubital) plasma immediately after corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation of pituitary corticotropin secretion. In samples obtained 4, 6, and 15 minutes after stimulation with corticotropin-releasing hormone, eutopic corticotropin secretion is associated with a ratio of the central-plasma corticotropin level to the peripheral-plasma corticotropin level of 3 or more. Ectopic corticotropin secretion is associated with a central-to-peripheral corticotropin ratio of less than 3. The positive predictive value of this test is 1 (Figure 4

FIGURE 4Maximal Ratio of Corticotropin in Inferior Petrosal Sinus Plasma to Corticotropin in Peripheral Plasma in Patients with Cushing’s Syndrome, Ectopic Corticotropin Secretion, or Adrenal Disease.).28

Although some authorities suggest that inferior petrosal sinus sampling can safely be bypassed in patients with corticotropin-dependent Cushing’s syndrome and a well-defined pituitary adenoma, I disagree. The incidence of nonfunctioning pituitary microadenomas is between 15% and 40%.29 This means that up to 40% of patients with ectopic secretion of corticotropin have an incidental pituitary abnormality. If it is assumed that the pituitary abnormality is responsible for corticotropin secretion, 15 to 40% of patients with ectopic secretion of corticotropin will be misdiagnosed and submitted to a transsphenoidal exploration of the sella turcica and pituitary gland. The prevalence of ectopic corticotropin secretion in the population of patients with undiagnosed Cushing’s syndrome is about 10%, accounting for 2400 patients. Up to 40% of these patients, or 960, have an incidental pituitary tumor. The mortality associated with transsphenoidal microadenomectomy is 1%.30 If all 360 to 960 patients undergo this procedure, there will be up to 10 deaths from an operation that can have no benefit. For this reason alone, all patients with corticotropin-dependent Cushing’s syndrome should undergo inferior petrosal sinus sampling to confirm the source of corticotropin secretion before any surgical intervention is contemplated.

Patients with eutopic corticotropin secretion are almost certain to have a corticotropin-secreting pituitary microadenoma. An occasional patient will have alcohol-induced pseudo–Cushing’s syndrome. The slightest suggestion of alcoholism should lead to a 3-week abstinence period before any surgery is considered.31

Patients with ectopic corticotropin secretion are first evaluated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest. In two thirds of these patients, a tumor will be found.25 If nothing is found in the chest, MRI of the abdominal and pelvic organs is performed. If these additional imaging studies are also negative, there are two options: bilateral adrenalectomy or blockade of cortisol synthesis. If blockade is chosen, the patient should undergo repeat scanning at 6-month intervals.32 If no source is found by the end of the second year, it is unlikely that the source will ever be found, and bilateral adrenalectomy should be performed for definitive treatment (Doppman JL: personal communication).

Corticotropin-independent Cushing’s syndrome is usually caused by an adrenal neoplasm. Benign tumors tend to be small (<5 cm in diameter) and secrete a single hormone, cortisol. The contralateral adrenal gland is suppressed by the cortisol secreted from the tumorous gland. If the value for Hounsfield units is less than 10 and the washout of contrast material is greater than 60% at 15 minutes, the tumor is almost certainly benign.33 Such tumors can be treated successfully with laparoscopic adrenalectomy.

The syndromes of micronodular and macronodular adrenal dysplasia usually affect both adrenal glands. The nodules secrete cortisol. Corticotropin is suppressed, as is the internodular tissue of the adrenal glands. Percutaneous bilateral adrenalectomy, followed by glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment, is curative.

Adrenal tumors secreting more than one hormone (i.e., cortisol and androgen or estrogen) are almost always malignant. Surgical removal of all detectable disease is indicated, as is a careful search for metastases. If metastases are found, they should be removed. This usually requires an open adrenalectomy. It goes without saying that adrenal tumors, nodules, and metastases should be treated by the most experienced endocrine cancer surgeon available.

If the plasma cortisol level on the morning after a transsphenoidal microadenomectomy is 0, the operation was a success. The patient should be treated with oral hydrocortisone, at a dose of 12 mg per square meter of body-surface area once a day in the morning, and a tetracosactide (Cortrosyn) stimulation test should be performed at 3-month intervals. When the tetracosactide-stimulated plasma cortisol level is higher than 20 μg per deciliter (551 μmol per liter), cortisol administration can be stopped. The same rule applies in the case of a unilateral adrenalectomy. If the adrenalectomy is bilateral, cortisol, at a dose of 12 to 15 mg per square meter per day, and fludrocortisone (Florinef), at a dose of 100 μg per day, should be prescribed as lifelong therapy.

SUMMARY

The obesity epidemic has led to necessary changes in the evaluation and treatment of patients with Cushing’s syndrome. The most dramatic change is the emphasis on the antianabolic alterations in Cushing’s syndrome, which can provide a strong basis for separating patients with Cushing’s syndrome from the more numerous patients with obesity and the metabolic syndrome. More can be done along these lines. Likelihood ratios are known for proximal muscle weakness and can be known for brain atrophy and growth failure in children.

The dexamethasone-suppression test, although still very popular, no longer has a role in the evaluation and treatment of patients with Cushing’s syndrome. Only three biochemical tests are needed: urinary free cortisol, plasma corticotropin, and plasma cortisol measurements. Urinary free cortisol excretion is the test that confirms the clinical diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome. To be trustworthy, it must be performed in the most stringent way, with the use of high-pressure liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometric quantitation of cortisol. Measurement of plasma corticotropin is used to separate corticotropin-dependent from corticotropin-independent causes of Cushing’s syndrome and to separate eutopic from ectopic secretion of corticotropin. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling should be performed in all patients with corticotropin-dependent Cushing’s syndrome because of the high prevalence of nonfunctioning incidental pituitary adenomas among such patients. Measurement of plasma cortisol has only one use: determining the success or failure of transsphenoidal microadenomectomy or adrenalectomy. If the plasma cortisol level is not measurable on the morning after the operation (<5 μg per deciliter [138 μmol per liter]), the procedure was a success; if it is measurable, the operation failed. The surgeon must not administer intraoperative or postoperative synthetic glucocorticoids until the plasma cortisol level has been measured.

Successful evaluation of a patient who is suspected of having Cushing’s syndrome requires an endocrinologist who is skilled in physical diagnosis. Also required is a laboratory that measures urinary free cortisol using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry and that can measure plasma cortisol and plasma corticotropin by means of radioimmunoassay.

Inferior petrosal sinus sampling is performed by an interventional radiologist. The treatment for all causes of Cushing’s syndrome, other than exogenous glucocorticoids, is surgical, and neurosurgeons, endocrine surgeons, and cancer surgeons are needed. This level of multidisciplinary medical expertise is usually found only at academic medical centers. Thus, most, if not all, patients with Cushing’s syndrome should be referred to such a center for treatment.

Disclosure forms provided by the author are available with the full text of this article at NEJM.org.

No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

SOURCE INFORMATION

From the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Clinical Nutrition, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland.

Address reprint requests to Dr. Loriaux at the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Clinical Nutrition, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd., L607, Portland, OR 97239-3098, or at .

From http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMra1505550

Cushing’s Disease Treatment Market to Witness an Outstanding Growth by 2017 – 2025

Cushing disease is caused by tumour in the pituitary gland which leads to excessive secretion of a hormone called adrenocorticotrophic (ACTH), which in turn leads to increasing levels of cortisol in the body. Cortisol is a steroid hormone released by the adrenal glands and helps the body to deal with injury or infection. Increasing levels of cortisol increases the blood sugar and can even cause diabetes mellitus. However the disease is also caused due to excess production of hypothalamus corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) which stimulates the synthesis of cortisol by the adrenal glands.

The condition is named after Harvey Cushing, the doctor who first identified the disease in 1912. Cushing disease results in Cushing syndrome. Cushing syndrome is a group of signs and symptoms developed due to prolonged exposure to cortisol.

Signs and symptoms of Cushing syndrome includes hypertension, abdominal obesity, muscle weakness, headache, fragile skin, acne, thin arms and legs, red stretch marks on stomach, fluid retention or swelling, excess body and facial hair, weight gain, acne, buffalo hump, tiredness, fatigue, brittle bones, low back pain, moon shaped face etc.

Symptoms vary from individual to individual depending upon the disease duration, age and gender of the patient.  Disease diagnosis is done by measuring levels of cortisol in patient’s urine, saliva or blood. For confirming the diagnosis, a blood test for ACTH is performed. The first-line treatment of the disease is through surgical resection of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, however disease management is also done through medications, Cushing disease treatment market comprises of the drugs designed for lowering the level of cortisol in the body. Thus patients suffering from Cushing disease are prescribed medications such as ketoconazole, mitotane, aminoglutethimide metyrapone, mifepristone, etomidate and pasireotide.

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Cushing’s disease treatment market revenue is growing with a stable growth rate, this is attributed to increasing number of pipeline drugs. Also increasing interest of pharmaceutical companies to develop Cushing disease drugs is a major factor contributing to the revenue growth of Cushing disease treatment market over the forecast period. Current and emerging players’ focuses on physician education and awareness regarding availability of different drugs for curing Cushing disease, thus increasing the referral speeds, time to diagnosis and volume of diagnosed Cushing disease individuals. Growing healthcare expenditure and increasing awareness regarding Cushing syndrome aids in the revenue growth of Cushing’s disease treatment market. Increasing number of new product launches also drives the market for Cushing’s disease Treatment devices. However availability of alternative therapies for curing Cushing syndrome is expected to hamper the growth of the Cushing’s disease treatment market over the forecast period.

The Cushing’s disease Treatment market is segment based on the product type, technology type and end user

Cushing’s disease Treatment market is segmented into following types:

By Drug Type

  • Ketoconazole
  • Mitotane
  • Aminoglutethimide
  • Metyrapone
  • Mifepristone
  • Etomidate
  • Pasireotide

By End User

  • Hospital Pharmacies
  • Retail Pharmacies
  • Drug Stores
  • Clinics
  • e-Commerce/Online Pharmacies

Cushing’s disease treatment market revenue is expected to grow at a good growth rate, over the forecast period. The market is anticipated to perform well in the near future due to increasing awareness regarding the condition. Also the market is anticipated to grow with a fastest CAGR over the forecast period, attributed to increasing investment in R&D and increasing number of new product launches which is estimated to drive the revenue growth of Cushing’s disease treatment market over the forecast period.

Depending on geographic region, the Cushing’s disease treatment market is segmented into five key regions: North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific (APAC) and Middle East & Africa (MEA).

North America is occupying the largest regional market share in the global Cushing’s disease treatment market owing to the presence of more number of market players, high awareness levels regarding Cushing syndrome. Healthcare expenditure and relatively larger number of R&D exercises pertaining to drug manufacturing and marketing activities in the region. Also Europe is expected to perform well in the near future due to increasing prevalence of the condition in the region.

Asia Pacific is expected to grow at the fastest CAGR because of increase in the number of people showing the symptoms of Cushing syndrome, thus boosting the market growth of Cushing’s disease treatment market throughout the forecast period.

Some players of Cushing’s disease Treatment market includes CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS, HRA Pharma, Strongbridge Biopharma plc, Novartis AG, etc. However there are numerous companies producing branded generics for Cushing disease. The companies in Cushing’s disease treatment market are increasingly engaged in strategic partnerships, collaborations and promotional activities to capture a greater pie of market share.

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Pituitary Issues: Irregular Periods

Q: I am 28 years old and I have not yet started my periods naturally. I have to take medicine for periods — Novelon. The doctors say that there is some problem with my hormones in the pituitary gland. Please advise me how to get normal and natural periods, because after taking the medicine I get my period, but without medicines I don’t.

A by Dr Sharmaine Mitchell: The problem you have with your menstrual period being irregular is most likely due to overproduction of the hormone prolactin by the pituitary gland in the brain. The pituitary gland can sometimes enlarge and cause an overproduction of prolactin and this can result in inappropriate milk production in the breasts (white nipple discharge), irregular menstruation or absent menstrual periods, headaches and blurred vision. The blurred vision occurs as a result of compression of the optic nerve which supplies the eyes, by the enlarged brain tumour in the pituitary gland.

You should get a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT scan of the brain and pituitary gland done. You should also test your prolactin levels to determine the extent of overproduction of the hormone.

Other investigations should include a thyroid function test (TSH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and leutinizing hormone (LH), and baseline testosterone level tests.

Abnormalities in the production of thyroid hormones can also cause menstrual irregularities and this should be ruled out.

Polycystic ovarian disease can also cause irregular menstrual periods and checking the level of FSH, LH and testosterone will help to rule out this diagnosis. This condition is usually associated with excessive weight gain, abnormal male pattern distribution on the face, chest and abdomen and an increased risk for diabetes mellitus. A pelvic ultrasound to look at the structure of the ovaries and to rule out polycystic ovaries is essential.

If the pituitary gland is enlarged, then medication can be prescribed to shrink it. Bromocriptine or Norprolac are commonly used drugs which work well in reducing the prolactin levels and establishing regular menstrual cycles. The use of these drugs will also help to establish ovulation and improve your fertility.

In some cases it may become necessary to have surgery done if the tumour in the pituitary gland is large and does not respond to the usual medications prescribed to shrink the pituitary gland. The MRI of the brain and pituitary gland will give an idea as to the size of the gland and help to determine if there is a need for you to see the neurosurgeon.

In most cases medical management with drugs will work well and there is no need for surgical intervention. This is a problem that can recur, so it may be necessary to take treatment intermittently for a long period of time, especially if fertility is desired.

Consult your doctor who will advise you further. Best wishes.

Dr Sharmaine Mitchell is an obstetrician and gynaecologist. Send questions via e-mail to allwoman@jamaicaobserver.com; write to All Woman, 40-42 1/2 Beechwood Ave, Kingston 5; or fax to 968-2025. All responses are published. Dr Mitchell cannot provide personal responses.

DISCLAIMER:

The contents of this article are for informational purposes only and must not be relied upon as an alternative to medical advice or treatment from your own doctor.

From http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/magazines/allwoman/Still-no-normal-period-at-28_87596

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