Questions about Korlym?

Corcept is providing a nurse to help with insurance and other topics.

If you want a person to talk with her contact info is:

Kate Tully, R.N., B.S.N.
(650) 688-2804
ktully@corcept.com

Cushing’s Patient Advocate
Corcept Therapeutics
149 Commonwealth Drive
Menlo Park, CA 94025

More information about Korlym at http://www.korlym.com

MEN1 and pituitary adenomas

Abstract

MEN1 gene mutations predispose carriers to pituitary tumors. Molecular pathways involved in the development of these tumors seem different to what is known in sporadic tumors. Clinical studies showed that all types of adenomas can be found with a predominance of prolactinoma and macroadenoma compared to a control population.

These MEN1 tumors seem more aggressive, invasive and resistant to treatment requiring a very careful long-life follow-up. Occurrence of these tumors can be described in the pediatric population and it can be the first and only manifestation of MEN1 for some years asking the question of the systematic screening for MEN1 gene mutation in pediatric population with pituitary adenoma.

More at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003426612000625

Cushing’s Disease and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

Gabriel Zada, Amir Tirosh, Ursula B. Kaiser, Edward R. Laws and Whitney W. Woodmansee

Department of Neurosurgery (G.Z., E.R.L.) and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension (A.T., U.B.K., W.W.W.), Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: Gabriel Zada, M.D., 15 Francis Street, PBB3, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. E-mail: gzada@usc.edu.

Abstract

Case Illustration: A 33-yr-old woman with Cushing’s disease underwent successful surgical resection of a pituitary adenoma and developed IIH 11 months later after inadvertent withdrawal of oral glucocorticoids.

Methods: A review of the literature was conducted to identify previous studies pertaining to IIH in association with neuroendocrine disease, focusing on reports related to HPA axis dysfunction.

Results: A number of patients developing IIH due to a relative deficiency in glucocorticoids, after surgical or medical management for Cushing’s disease, withdrawal from glucocorticoid replacement, or as an initial presentation of Addison’s disease, have been reported. Hypotheses regarding the underlying pathophysiology of IIH in this context and, in particular, the role of cortisol and its relationship to other neuroendocrine and inflammatory mediators that may regulate the homeostasis of cerebrospinal fluid production and absorption are reviewed.

Conclusion: In a subset of patients, dysfunction of the HPA axis appears to play a role in the development of IIH. Hormonal control of cerebrospinal fluid production and absorption may be regulated by inflammatory mediators and the enzyme 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. Further study of neuroendocrine markers in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid may be an avenue for further research in IIH.

Read the entire article at http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/95/11/4850.full

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