Long-term Cognitive Effects of Glucocorticoid Excess in Cushing’s Syndrome

Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2016 Mar;65:26-33. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2015.11.020. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

Forget H1, Lacroix A2, Bourdeau I2, Cohen H3.

Abstract

CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE:

We previously found that patients with Cushing’s syndrome (CS) scored lower than controls in several domains of cognitive function and that correction of hypercortisolism is not necessarily correlated with short-term improvement in intellectual performance. Here, we examined the long-term outcome in patients treated for CS by assessing the extent to which the detrimental effects of glucocorticoid (GC) excess on cognition can be reversed three years after corrective surgery.

DESIGN:

A battery of neuropsychological tests, including tests of attention, visuospatial processing, learning and memory, and executive functioning were administered pre-treatment and 12, 24 and 36 months post-treatment.

PATIENTS AND CONTROL SUBJECTS:

We included 18 patients with endogenous CS recruited before surgical treatment and 18 controls matched for age, sex and education.

RESULTS:

CS patients performed worse than controls on tests of attention, executive functioning and nonverbal aspects of memory. Moreover, at 36 months following eucortisolism, executive function performance and, to a lesser extent, attention tasks showed limited change compared to pre-treatment testing.

CONCLUSION:

Chronic hypercortisolism is accompanied by a deleterious impact on aspects of cognitive function. This negative effect on attention, executive performance and nonverbal memory seen in patients with CS suggests a differential effect of excess GCs upon different brain areas and networks. This influence persists years after the return to normal cortisol secretion levels.

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Attention; Cognitive functions; Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome; Glucocorticoids; Hypercortisolism; Memory

PMID:
26708069
[PubMed – in process]

From http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26708069

What a Hoot! Healing Cushing’s Syndrome Naturally

This guy must be nuts!

Healing Cushing’s Syndrome Naturally

by Dr. Paul Haider, Spiritual Teacher and Master Herbalist

Cushing’s Syndrome is the over production of cortisol by the adrenals glands and the resulting obesity, high blood pressure, fatigue, depression, muscle weakness, glucose intolerance, and more… are all part of the syndrome.

But there is hope, here are a few great herbs and other processes that can heal Cushing’s Syndrome naturally.

Read more of how you, too, can “Heal Your Cushing’s here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/healing-cushings-syndrome-naturally-dr-paul-haider

8th Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day

Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day

Join us on Saturday, September 17, 2016

8th Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day
Saturday, September 17, 2016, 9:30 a.m.
Location:
Johns Hopkins Mt. Washington Conference Center
5801 Smith Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21209
map and directions

This is a free event, but seating is limited. Reserve your space now: Please R.S.V.P. by September 9, 2016 by email (preferred) to PituitaryDay@jhmi.edu  or by calling Alison Dimick at 410-955-3921.

Agenda

9:30 – 9:55 a.m.: Registration

9:55 – 10:00 a.m.: Welcome and Acknowledgements

10:00 – 10:25 a.m.: Different Kinds of Tumors in the Pituitary Area: Non-Functioning, Acromegaly, Cushing, etc. (Roberto Salvatori, M.D.)

10:25 – 10:50 a.m.: The Pituitary Gland, Cortisol and Stress (Gary Wand, M.D.)

10:50 – 11:10 a.m.: A Patient’s Story

11:10 – 11:30 a.m.: The Eye and the Pituitary Gland: Why It’s Important to SEE the Right Doctor (Pun Intended) (Dan Gold, D.O.)

11:30 – 11:50 a.m.: Surgery for Pituitary Tumors: (Not So Scary) Pictures from the Operating Room Treating Acromegaly, Cushing and Non-Functioning Tumors (Gary Gallia, M.D., Ph.D.)

11:50 a.m. – 12:10 p.m.: Coordinating the Care of Pituitary Patients: It Takes a Village (Pituitary Nurse)

12:10 – 12:30 p.m.: Radiation Therapy for Cushing, Acromegaly and Non-Functioning Tumors: A Good Option when Needed (Lawrence Kleinberg, M.D.)

12:30 – 1:25 p.m.: Lunch

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Round Table Discussions:

  • Medical: Making Sense of So Many Medications
  • Surgical: Meet Surgeons and Patients Who Have Had Pituitary Surgery
  • Radiation: Share Your eX-peRience!
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