Next-Generation Compounds and Support Commercialization of Korlym(R)

Corcept markets Korlym® for the treatment of Cushing’s syndrome, a severe orphan illness that afflicts 20,000 people in the United States, approximately half of whom are cured by surgery. Corcept believes that revenue from the sale of Korlym, combined with the company’s cash reserves, will allow it to reach cash flow breakeven while fully supporting its development activities.

via Warrant Exercises Generate $17.2 Million; Proceeds to Advance Next-Generation Compounds and Support Commercialization of Korlym(R).

Corcept Therapeutics Announces Nine Poster Presentations on Mifepristone for the Treatment of Cushing’s Syndrome at the 97th Annual Endocrine Society Meeting – MarketWatch

ENDO_2015

 

Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated CORT,  a pharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of drugs for the treatment of severe metabolic, oncologic and psychiatric disorders, today announced that a variety of posters about Korlym(R) (mifepristone) will be presented at the 97th annual Endocrine Society Meeting (ENDO 2015) being held at the San Diego Convention Center from March 5 – 7, 2015.

“We are pleased to see the breadth of new data being presented at ENDO 2015 about Korlym (mifepristone), which adds to the already substantial literature describing the use of mifepristone to treat Cushing’s Syndrome,” said Joseph K. Belanoff, M.D., Corcept’s Chief Executive Officer. “We are committed to bringing innovative therapies to patients in need, and we look forward to continuing our pivotal role in advancing the scientific understanding of Cushing’s syndrome and other rare and debilitating diseases.”

Multiple endocrinologists, researchers and centers of excellence are presenting a total of nine abstracts.

Read the entire article at Corcept Therapeutics Announces Nine Poster Presentations on Mifepristone for the Treatment of Cushing’s Syndrome at the 97th Annual Endocrine Society Meeting – MarketWatch.

Cushing’s Awareness Challenge: Day 12

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Mail!  I get all kinds of email asking questions about a variety of Cushing’s issues.  I’m not a doctor and I don’t play one on TV.  I don’t even play one on the internet.  People are desperate for answers, though, so the questions keep coming and I try to answer the best I can.

Here’s a recent question and answer.  Note that you have to be logged into the message boards to view the links in this post.

 

Question: My daughter was diagnosed w/ cushings in 2001 at the age of 20 & had the pituitary surgery.

In late 2013 she was diagnosed with a recurrence. I’ve read that that usually happens within 5 years, not a dozen years.

Regardless, there is a new research program but she was told she doesn’t qualify for it. The other medications offered are either exhorbitant ($100-200,000/year), another causes liver damage, another causes uterine problems. A 2nd surgery is not recommended according to  the surgeon (because there would be only a 50% rate of success due to the scar tissue from the original surgery), and radiation is being vetoed as well, being recommended ONLY as a very last possible resort.

Are there other parents who chat & share experience here? Will I find help as a parent here with my frustration over this disease? Are there other patients who communicate here that are from Michigan?  Are there other patients here who are suffering from the recurrence? Don’t get me wrong, I’m happy to find on several sites online today that there are so many success stories; I would just like to know what other options there are that perhaps our Dr. is missing.  Thanks.

My response:

S, since you have a Board Name, I assume that you are a member of the message boards.

There are areas specifically for recurrence – http://cushings.invisionzone.com/index.php?/forum/35-recurrences/

People in Michigan: http://cushings.invisionzone.com/index.php?/topic/13696-michigan/

Parents of patients: http://cushings.invisionzone.com/index.php?/forum/31-parents-spouses-children-and-friends-of-patients/

The more you read, the more you will learn.  Many patients with a recurrence  have a second pituitary surgery.  She might need to get another opinion from another surgeon.

Another option is a BLA – or have her adrenal glands out.  That can cause other issues, though.

The 2 drugs you  mentioned are Signifor and Korlym.  Although both are expensive, each has a patient assistance plan which lowers the cost dramatically.  Doses can vary dramatically so that they don’t necessarily cause liver or uterine issues.

Ketoconazole is another drug that’s sometimes used.

I did a search on the boards and there are 69 topics for Mifepristone (generic Korlym), 51 topics discussing the brand name Korlym, 40 for pasireotide (generic Signifor), 13 for the brand name Signifor, and 69 for keto (the common abbreviation on the boards for ketoconazole)

Here’s a personal experience from a woman on Korlym who likes it: http://cushings.invisionzone.com/index.php?/topic/53342-i-like-korlym/?hl=korlym

So – the information is out there.

I know it’s hard to process all this and make decisions.

I know it’s hard to process all this and make decisions. I had my one pituitary surgery in 1987, before the Internet was available so I had to really research all this in medical texts.

At that time, there weren’t any drug options. Just surgery and radiation. I decided off the bat if I should have a recurrence, I would not do radiation. I’d go for another pituitary surgery first, then a BLA if needed.

But that was then and this is now.  There is way more information which is much easier to find.  There are better surgical options and even some more medical ones.

Good luck!

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NIH: An Open-Label Study of The Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Mifepristone in Children With Refractory Cushing’s Disease

This study is currently recruiting participants.

Summary

Number 13-CH-0170
Sponsoring Institute National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Recruitment Detail Type: Participants currently recruited/enrolled
Gender: Male & Female
Min Age: 6
Max Age: 17
Referral Letter Required No
Population Exclusion(s) None
Special Instructions Currently Not Provided
Keywords Child;
Cushing Syndrome;
Metabolism;
Mifepristone;
Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic
Recruitment Keyword(s) None
Condition(s) Cushing’s Syndrome;
Cushing Syndrome
Investigational Drug(s) Mifepristone
Investigational Device(s) None
Intervention(s) Drug: mifepristone
Supporting Site National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Background:

– There are currently no approved therapies for children with Cushing’s disease who are not cured by surgery alone. A drug called mifepristone has been approved to treat adults with Cushing’s syndrome and elevated blood glucose caused by Cushing’s. The drug is marketed under the name Korlym(Registered Trademark). The study drug may have a different effect on a child’s body than an adult’s, so researchers want to know how much of the drug to give children and what effect it will have. They want to learn if mifepristone improves Cushing’s disease in children as it does in adults. They also want to know about the drug’s side effects in children.

Objectives:

– To study the effect of a medication called mifepristone in children with Cushing’s disease that has not been helped by pituitary surgery.

Eligibility:

– Children ages 6 to 17 with active Cushing’s disease following pituitary surgery and who have a body weight higher than expected for their height and age.

Design:

– Participants will be screened for up to 8 weeks with a physical exam, medical history, and medical tests including blood tests and X-rays.

– Participants will take tablets of the study drug each day for 12 weeks.

– Participants will stay at the clinic for 4 nights at the beginning of the study. They will have three 1-day visits during the study. They will stay at the clinic the last 3 days of the study.

– At these visits, participants will be given several tests. In one test, a small wire is inserted under the skin of the belly and a small monitor is attached taped to the belly. In another, the participant drinks a liquid and blood samples are taken.

– Follow-up visits will occur 4 weeks and 12 weeks after the study ends.

–Back to Top–

Eligibility

INCLUSION CRITERIAPatients who are eligible for enrollment must meet the following eligibility criteria:

– Males and females 6-17 years at informed consent

– Active Cushing’s disease as demonstrated by the following:

–24 hour Urinary Free Cortisol greater than the upper limit of normal for age on two urine collections during screening and

— midnight serum cortisol > 4.4 mcg/dL (mean of two determinations on a single day at 2330 and 2400 during screening)

– Previous trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) for ACTH secreting pituitary tumor at least 3 months prior to screening

– Increased body weight defined by BMI Z-score of 1.5 or above

– Able to provide consent/assent

– Able to swallow study drug tablets (not crushed or split)

– Willing to use non-hormonal method of contraception in patients of reproductive potential

– Primary health care provider in home location

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

– Hypercortisolism not due to Cushing’s disease.

– Type 1 diabetes mellitus

– HbA1c geater than or equal to 9.5% at Screening

– Body weight < 25 kg

– Use of certain medications that are CYP3A substrates with narrow therapeutic ranges, such as simvastatin, lovastatin, cyclosporine, dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, fentanyl, pimozide, quinidine, sirolimus, and tacrolimus during the 4 weeks prior to starting study drug. Use of these medications is also prohibited until 2 weeks after end of dosing.

– Use of certain medications that are strong CYP3A inhibitors such as itraconazole, nefazodone, ritonavir, nelfinavir, indinavir, atazanavir, amprenavir, fosamprenavir, boceprevir, clarithromycin, conivaptan, lopinavir, mibefradil, posaconazole, saquinavir, telaprevir, telithromycin, and voriconazole during the 2 weeks prior to starting study drug.

Use of these medications is also prohibited until 2 weeks after end of dosing. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice are prohibited during this time frame.

– Use of certain medications that are strong inducers on CYP3A such as rifampin, rifabutin, rifapentin, phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, St. John’s wort during the 2 weeks prior to starting study drug. Use of these medications is also prohibited until 2 weeks after end of dosing.

– Use of medications used to treat hypercortisolism from the duration indicated below prior to Day 1. Use of the medications is also prohibited until after the end of study 4 week follow up visit.

–steroidogenesis inhibitors such as ketoconazole, metyrapone: 4 weeks

–cabergoline, bromocriptine, somatostatin analogs such as octreotide, lanreotide, pasireotide long acting formulations: 8 weeks (immediate release formulations: 2 weeks)

–mitotane: 8 weeks

– Use of systemic glucocorticoid medications beginning 1 month prior to screening or anticipated use of these medications except for the treatment of adrenal insufficiency. Use of glucocorticoid medications is prohibited during the study until after the end of study 4 week study visit.

– Inflammatory, rheumatological, proliferative or other disorder(s) that would be anticipated to worsen with glucocorticoid blockade (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, etc.).

– Uncontrolled hypo- or hyperthyroidism.

– Uncorrected hypokalemia (< 3.5 mEq/L). The screening period may be used to correct hypokalemia prior to starting study drug. Use of potassium and/or mineralocorticoid antagonists is permitted during the study.

– QTc geater than or equal to 450 msec on Screening electrocardiogram

– Unexplained vaginal bleeding in females and/or any history of endometrial pathology.

– Positive pregnancy test in females.

From http://clinicalstudies.info.nih.gov/cgi/detail.cgi?A_2013-CH-0170.html

Corcept Therapeutics Announces Partnership With Idis for Global Access to Korlym(R)

PRINCETON, NJ and MENLO PARK, CA, Jul 24, 2013 (Marketwired via COMTEX) — Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated CORT  announced today that Korlym(R) (mifepristone) 300 mg Tablets is available to patients outside of the United States through an Idis Access Program.

Idis Access Programs enable patients around the world to be prescribed investigational or approved drugs prior to their commercial launch in that country through a regulatory-compliant and ethical channel on a named-patient basis. Corcept, a pharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of drugs for the treatment of severe metabolic and psychiatric disorders, has been offering Korlym in the United States since April 2012 as a once-daily oral treatment of hyperglycemia secondary to endogenous Cushing’s syndrome in adult patients who have type 2 diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance and have failed surgery or are not candidates for surgery.

“We are pleased to partner with Idis so that physicians outside the United States can prescribe Korlym,” said Steven Lo, Corcept’s Vice President of Commercial Operations. “We are dedicated to meeting the needs of patients worldwide. Our partnership with Idis will help us make sure that every Cushing’s syndrome patient who could benefit from Korlym will have access to the medicine.”

Charles Simmons, President of Established Brands at Idis said of the partnership, “We are very excited to work with Corcept to provide patients around the world with access to this important treatment. Patients are at the heart of what we do at Idis and providing access to an important medicine like Korlym, creating a bridge to treatment irrespective of the number of patients involved, is one of the ways we do it”.

Licensed healthcare professionals outside the United States with patients who might benefit from Korlym should contact Idis directly:

Idis UK & Eire Enquiries Tel: +44 (0) 1932 824 100 Fax: +44 (0) 1932 824 300 Email: uk@idispharma.com

Idis Rest of the World Enquiries Tel: +44 (0) 1932 824 123 Fax: +44 (0) 1932 824 323 Email: internationalsales@idispharma.com

About Cushings Syndrome Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is caused by prolonged exposure of the body’s tissues to high levels of the hormone cortisol and is generated by tumors that produce cortisol or ACTH. Cushing’s syndrome is an orphan indication that most commonly affects adults aged 20 to 50. Symptoms vary, but most people have one or more of the following manifestations: high blood sugar, diabetes, high blood pressure, upper body obesity, rounded face, increased fat around the neck, thinning arms and legs, severe fatigue and weak muscles. Irritability, anxiety, cognitive disturbances and depression are also common. Cushing’s syndrome can affect every organ system in the body and can be fatal if not treated effectively.

About Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated Corcept is a pharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of drugs for the treatment of severe metabolic and psychiatric disorders. Korlym, a first generation GR-II antagonist, is the company’s first FDA-approved medication. Corcept has a phase 3 trial underway for mifepristone for treatment of the psychotic features of psychotic depression and a portfolio of selective GR-II antagonists that block the effects of cortisol but not progesterone. It owns extensive intellectual property covering the use of GR-II antagonists, including mifepristone, in the treatment of a wide variety of metabolic and psychiatric disorders. It also holds composition of matter patents for its selective GR-II antagonists. For more information about Corcept please visit: http://www.corcept.com

About Idis Idis has 25 years experience partnering with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to create regulatory-compliant, ethical access to medicines for healthcare professionals and their patients with unmet medical needs. Since 1987, Idis has developed and managed access to thousands of medicines from every therapeutic category, impacting the lives of hundreds of thousands of patients in countries around the world.

Idis leverages decades of experience, regulatory insight, and a thorough understanding of local and global requirements to create access to medicines at every stage of a product’s lifecycle from pre-approval to market exit, and in times of unexpected production shortages.

The company’s European headquarters are located in Weybridge, United Kingdom, and North American headquarters are located in Princeton, NJ.

For more information about Idis please visit http://www.idispharma.com.

From Marketwatch

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