Why is recovery from pituitary surgery so damn slow?

From the Cushing’s Awareness Challenge: “For a lot Cushing’s patients, the hardest thing to deal with after surgery is uncertainty regarding whether you are actually in remission or not. This might be very difficult for family and friends that never had Cushing’s to really understand. You had surgery, a tumor was removed – how can you not tell if you are better?”

a tale of two tumors

For a lot Cushing’s patients, the hardest thing to deal with after surgery is uncertainty regarding whether you are actually in remission or not. This might be very difficult for family and friends that never had Cushing’s to really understand.  You had surgery, a tumor was removed – how can you not tell if you are better?

Well, it is just not that simple!   For starters, the pituitary gland is has just been sliced up like a loaf of Wonder Bread (literally – in addition to removing tumors that have been located in advance, most surgeons explore the gland during surgery to make sure no other tiny tumors are missed) and it needs time to recover.  If you had knee surgery and the surgeon sliced your knee up in multiple locations, you wouldn’t expect to just pop out of the recovery room and start skipping around.  Recovery from  pituitary…

View original post 788 more words

Day Twenty-four, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2015

Cushie Crusader, that’s me…and many others.  I think we all have an opportunity to be Cushie Crusaders every time we tell others about our illness, share our story on or offline, post about our struggles – and triumphs – on the message boards, write blog posts in this Cushing’s Awareness Challenge…

When we have prayer time in my handbell practice or choir rehearsals I try to mention issues that are going on in the community.  People are slowly but steadily learning about Cushing’s week by week.

A piano student mentioned that a person in a group she is in has Cushing’s, a non-Cushie friend mentioned last week that she had gone with a friend of hers to an endo appointment to discuss Cushing’s.

Get out there and talk about Cushing’s.  Let people know that it’s not just for dogs and horses (and sometimes ferrets)!

Here’s something I had made for Sue with SuperSue embroidered on the back.  Picture your name instead:

 

 

 

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: