The 3 Things That Wreck Your Hormones (Part 3) | Alan Christianson

adrenal-glands

When it comes to your hormones, stress is all about the adrenal glands. These are a couple of nickel-sized pieces of tissue that can completely make or break your health. The adrenal glands can be affected by diseases, but this is extremely rare and rather straightforward for doctors to diagnose. It is much more common for the adrenal glands to be free of disease but dysfunctional under a large stress load.

The adrenals are different from your other glands in that they make different amounts of hormones as the day goes on. They release a burst of cortisol to wake us up, and they shut it off at night to let us sleep.

Even when a disease or the aging process is the core problem with your hormones, the adrenals still play a role, and here is why: Hormones don’t really do anything until they go inside of your cells. Each cell has a wall around it that lets in just the right amount of hormones at just the right times.

Think of your cell as a castle wall with a drawbridge that only comes down to those who know the password phrase. The password phrase that lets hormones into your cell is “the cortisol rhythm.” The cortisol rhythm is controlled by the adrenal glands. When adrenal hormones are wrecked, it is important to understand what this means. It doesn’t mean they are unable to make hormones; it means their rhythm is disturbed. This is important because you may read that taking cortisol can help if you have low cortisol. At first, this makes sense and seems to fit the strategy for thyroid disease — if you have too little thyroid hormone, take some to replace what is lacking. The problem is that in the case of adrenal stress, low cortisol is not the result of the adrenals being unable to make cortisol. It is the result of all the parts involved in cortisol production being off in their timing. Putting more cortisol into the system just makes the problem worse.

If taking cortisol is not the answer, then what is?

Read the rest of the article at The 3 Things That Wreck Your Hormones (Part 3) | Alan Christianson.

 

 

Myth: YOU are the problem and the reason for your cortisol levels…

Myth: YOU are the problem and the reason for your cortisol levels. Having issues with too much or too little cortisol, the stress hormone, means that YOU are stressing too much or are too anxious. “YOU could control your levels if you would JUST calm down!”
myth-busted
Fact: YOU are NOT the problem! The dysfunction in your body is the problem. It is true that cortisol is your stress hormone or fight or flight hormone. This hormone helps your body compensate for and deal with trauma or stress, both physical and emotional. So, yes, your body does have a reaction to stress.
However, for people with Cushing’s, that hormone goes haywire. Too much cortisol leads to Cushing’s symptoms and having too little cortisol leads to Adrenal Insufficiency. Normally, our bodies’ response to stress is to pump out 10X the amount of your baseline cortisol to cope. If it is not able to do this, it will go into shock and can lead to death unless the emergency protocol is followed with an emergency injection of steroid. No amount of coping skills can “control” one’s physiological response to stress.

Today in Lab History

Jokichi Takamine was a Japanese-American biochemist and industrialist, born Nov. 3, 1854, who isolated the hormone produced in the adrenal gland that causes the body to respond to emergencies. This chemical was adrenalin — now called epinephrine — from the suprarenal gland. It was the first pure hormone to be isolated from natural sources.

He applied for and received a U.S. patent on the substance, and went on to make a fortune with his marketing of Adrenalin. In fact, the product that he marketed was not pure epinephrine, but a mixture of the hormone and its sibling compound, norepinephrine, or noradrenaline. It is now made synthetically. He also found takadastase, and played a key role in the introduction of phosphate fertilizer along with various other manufacturing and chemical industries to Japan.

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How_to_give_EpiPen

Epinephrine, an EpiPen or Auvi-Q/Allerject injection, should be given in the mid-anterior lateral thigh (not the outer thigh). We call this the EpiCenter of the thigh, and this video segment from the EpiCenter Medical (http://www.epicentermedical.com) online anaphylaxis first aid course has a thigh location graphic to help you pinpoint the most effective location for the injection.

Mutation of ARMC5 gene characterized as the cause of meningeal tumour growth

Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have published their findings that mutations in a gene known as “ARMC5” promote the growth of benign tumours in the adrenal glands and on the meninges: ARMC5 appears to belong to the group of so-called tumour suppressor genes. It is the first time in years that scientists have characterized such a gene.

The ARMC5 gene was discovered by independent workgroups studying – so-called adrenal adenomas – in connection with Cushing’s syndrome. In this disease, the body produces too much of the . Now, for the first time, a mutation of ARMC5 has been characterized as the cause behind the growth of meningeal tumours. The results on this tumour syndrome, obtained by the group of Dr. Patrick May and PD. Dr. Jochen Schneider together with colleagues from Charité Berlin (Dr. Ulf Elbelt) and the Universities of Würzburg (Prof. Dr. Bruno Allolio) and Cologne (Dr. Michael Kloth), have been published recently in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology Metabolism.

Cortisol is an important hormone. It influences many metabolic pathways in the body and has a suppressing effect on the immune system. Accordingly, it is commonly employed as an anti-inflammatory medication. Prolonged, elevated levels of cortisol in the body can lead to obesity, muscular dystrophy, depression and other symptoms. To maintain the correct concentration in the blood, the body has a refined regulation system: Certain areas of the brain produce the hormone corticotropin as a stimulator of cortisol release; the actual formation of cortisol takes place in the . As the concentration of cortisol in the blood rises, the brain reduces the production of corticotropin.

In search of the causes of Cushing’s syndrome, scientists recently encountered certain genetic causes of benign tumours of the adrenal cortex. Growth of these adrenal cortex adenomas is based on a combination of hereditary and spontaneous mutations: It affects people in whom one of two “alternative copies” – one of the so-called alleles – of the ARMC5 gene is mutated from birth. If the second allele of ARMC5 later also undergoes a spontaneous mutation in the adrenal cortex, then the gene no longer functions. “What is interesting is that the failure of ARMC5 has no direct influence on cortisol production. However, because the tumour cells multiply faster than other body cells, and the number of cells in the tumour increases, the blood cortisol level rises in the course of the disease”, says Dr Schneider. Then, the level in the body rises and ultimately results in the onset of Cushing’s syndrome.

When other scientific workgroups discovered that further benign tumours – in this case meningeal tumours – occur more often in ARMC5-Cushing families, the group of Patrick May and Jochen Schneider sequenced the ARMC5 gene and studied it using bioinformatic techniques. “We demonstrated for the first time, in a patient with an adrenal cortex tumour and simultaneously a meningeal tumour, that somatic, that is non-hereditary, ARMC5 mutations are present in both tumours. This observation suggests that ARMC5 is a true tumour-suppressor gene.”

It must now be explored, Schneider continues, to what extent patients with adrenal cortex tumours ought to be screened for simultaneous presence of meningioma, and in which other types of tumour ARMC5 mutations are responsible for tumour growth: “Building upon that, we can learn whether the gene and the metabolic pathways it influences offer new approaches for treating the tumour syndrome.”

More information: “Molecular and Clinical Evidence for an ARMC5 Tumor Syndrome: Concurrent Inactivating Germline and Somatic Mutations are Associated with both Primary Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia and Meningioma.” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology Metabolism, October 2014. DOI: 10.1210/jc.2014-2648

Journal reference: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism search and more info website

Provided by University of Luxembourg search and more info

From http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-10-mutation-armc5-gene-characterized-meningeal.html

Dr Friedman: Meeting on Thyroid and Hormonal Problems

friedman

Dr. Theodore Friedman will host a free meeting on thyroid and hormonal problems on Sunday February 16 from 7-8 PM PST at Anshe Emes synagogue-1490 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90035.

The meeting will be videoconferenced to those who cannot make it in person.

To sign up for the videoconference, email mail@goodhormonehealth.com by February 14.

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