Could you Shed Some Light on Cushing’s Disease?

Dear Dr. Roach: Could you shed some light on Cushing’s disease? Four people in the same family have it. The doctors say it has something to do with the thyroid gland.

— Anon.

A: Cushing’s syndrome, which is different from Cushing’s disease, is an excess of cortisone or similar corticosteroids. It can be caused by taking too much steroid for too long, usually as treatment for a serious medical condition. Cushing’s disease is a special case of Cushing’s syndrome, when the excess cortisone is caused by a tumor in the pituitary gland, which spurs the adrenal gland to make excess amounts of hormone. Weight gain, almost exclusively in the abdomen, a striking round “moon” face, a fat pad on the back of the neck and upper back (“buffalo hump”), diabetes, pigmented stretch marks and high blood pressure are common findings in any form of Cushing’s syndrome.

It is very unusual for Cushing’s disease to run in families. Also, it does not affect the thyroid, although thyroid conditions can sometimes mimic Cushing’s (and vice versa). I suspect that what this might be is a rare condition called multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN-1). This does run in families, and combines risk for pituitary, parathyroid and pancreatic islet cell tumors. (The parathyroid glands sit on top of the thyroid gland and secrete parathyroid hormone, responsible for calcium metabolism. The pancreatic islet cells are where insulin is made.) Not everybody with MEN-1 will have tumors in all of these glands. Parathyroid tumors are the most common.

An endocrinologist is the expert in Cushing’s and the MEN syndromes.

​Dr. Keith Roach writes for North America Syndicate. Send letters to Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475 or email ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

From http://herald-review.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/roach/dr-keith-roach-teeth-grinding-is-common-in-the-elderly/article_bef63ba4-9b5e-5bff-b66a-3530be158857.html

%d bloggers like this: