Long-acting pasireotide safe, effective for recurrent Cushing’s disease

October 20, 2017

In patients with persistent or recurring Cushing’s disease after surgery, monthly pasireotide was safe and effective, leading to normal urinary free cortisol levels in about 40% of patients after 12 months, according to findings from a phase 3 clinical trial.

“Surgical resection of the causative pituitary adenoma is the first-line treatment of choice for most patients with Cushing’s disease, which leads to remission in greater than 75% of patients if done by an expert pituitary surgeon,” Andre Lacroix, MD, professor in the department of medicine at University of Montreal teaching hospital, and colleagues wrote in the study background. “However, surgery is not always successful, and disease recurrence can occur several years after initial remission, while some patients refuse or are not candidates for surgery. As a result, many patients require additional treatment options.”

Lacroix and colleagues analyzed data from 150 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of persistent, recurrent or new Cushing’s disease with mean urinary free cortisol level concentration 1.5 to five times the upper limit of normal, normal or greater than normal plasma and confirmed pituitary source of Cushing’s disease. Patients were recruited between December 2011 and December 2014; those who received mitotane therapy within 6 months, pituitary irradiation within 10 years or previous pasireotide treatment were excluded. Researchers randomly assigned patients to 10 mg (n = 74) or 30 mg (n = 76) monthly intramuscular pasireotide (Signifor LAR, Novartis) for 12 months, with investigators and patients masked to the group allocation and dose. Pasireotide was up-titrated from 10 mg to 30 mg or from 30 mg to 40 mg at month 4, or at month 7, 9 or 12 if urinary free cortisol concentrations remained greater than 1.5 times the upper limit of normal. At month 12, patients considered to be receiving clinical benefit from the therapy (mean urinary free cortisol concentration at or less than the upper limit of normal) could continue to receive it during an open-ended extension phase. The primary outcome was to assess the proportion of patients achieving mean urinary free cortisol concentration less than or equal to the upper limit of normal by month 7, regardless of dose.

Within the cohort, 41.9% of patients in the 10-mg group and 40.8% of patients in the 40-mg group met the primary endpoint at month 7, whereas 5% of patients in the 10-mg group and 13% of patients in the 40-mg group achieved partial control. Researchers did not observe between-sex differences or differences in response among those who did or did not undergo previous surgery.

The number of patients who achieved the primary endpoint at month 7 without an up-titration in dose was smaller, but not significantly different between the 10-mg and 40-mg dose groups (28.4% and 31.6%, respectively), according to researchers. Among those who received an up-titration in dose in the 10-mg and 40-mg groups (42% and 37%, respectively), 32% and 25%, respectively, were considered responders at month 7.

Researchers also observed improvements in several metabolic parameters during the 12-month course of treatment with both doses, including improvements in systolic and diastolic blood pressure; reductions in waist circumference, BMI and body weight; and improvement in scores for the Cushing’s Quality of Life questionnaire. The most common adverse events were hyperglycemia, diarrhea, cholelithiasis, diabetes and nausea.

The researchers noted that, in both dose groups, the reductions in mean urinary free cortisol concentration were observed within 1 month, with concentrations remaining below baseline levels for the 12-month study period.

“This large phase 3 trial showed that long-acting pasireotide administered for 12 months can reduce [median urinary free cortisol] concentrations, is associated with improvements in clinical signs and [health-related quality of life] and has a similar safety profile to that of twice-daily pasireotide,” the researchers wrote, adding that the long-acting formulation provides a convenient monthly administration schedule. – by Regina Schaffer

Disclosures: Novartis funded this study. Lacroix reports he has received grants and personal fees as a clinical investigator, study steering committee member and advisory board member for Novartis, Stonebridge and UpToDate. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

From https://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/in-the-journals/%7B55988079-312b-478d-8788-036a465b1881%7D/long-acting-pasireotide-safe-effective-for-recurrent-cushings-disease

Elevated late-night salivary cortisol may indicate recurrent Cushing’s disease

Carroll TB, et al. Endocr Pract. 2016;doi:10.4158/EP161380.OR.

 

Elevated late-night salivary cortisol may serve as an early biochemical marker of recurrent Cushing’s disease, and prompt intervention may result in clinical benefits for people with Cushing’s disease, according to recent study findings.

According to the researchers, late-night salivary cortisol level is more sensitive for detecting Cushing’s disease recurrence compared with urinary free cortisol or a dexamethasone suppression test.

Ty B. Carroll, MD, assistant professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin Endocrinology Center and Clinics in Menomonee Falls, and colleagues evaluated 15 patients (14 women; mean age, 49.1 years) with postsurgical recurrent Cushing’s disease (mean time to recurrence, 3.3 years) after initial remission to determine the performance of urinary free cortisol and late-night salivary cortisol measurements for detecting recurrent Cushing’s disease.

Participants were identified as having Cushing’s disease between 2008 and 2013; there was no standard for follow-up, but after remission confirmation participants were followed at least every 6 months after surgery for 2 years and then annually thereafter. Late-night salivary cortisol was the primary biochemical test to screen for recurrence, and follow-up tests with a dexamethasone suppression test, urinary free cortisol or other tests were performed if late-night salivary results were abnormal or if suspicion of recurrence was high.

Of the cohort, 80% had normal urinary free cortisol (< 45 µg/24 hours) at recurrence. Primary transphenoidal adenoma resection was performed in all participants. Evidence of pituitary adenoma on MRI at the time of recurrence was present in seven of 12 participants with normal urinary free cortisol and two of three participants with abnormal urinary free cortisol. Normal renal function was present in all participants, and 14 underwent testing with late-night salivary cortisol, dexamethasone suppression test and urinary free cortisol.

Of participants with normal urinary free cortisol at recurrence, nine had an abnormal dexamethasone suppression test (cortisol 1.8 µg/dL), and all had at least one elevated late-night salivary cortisol measurement (> 4.3 nmol/L). Mean late-night salivary cortisol was 10.2 nmol/L, and mean urinary free cortisol was 19.9 µg/24 hours.

Therapy for recurrent Cushing’s disease was administered in 11 of the 12 participants with abnormal urinary free cortisol. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-staining pituitary adenoma was confirmed in three participants who underwent repeat transphenoidal adenoma resection. Pharmacotherapy was administered to seven participants with normal urinary free cortisol, and two additional participants underwent bilateral adrenalectomy.

Abnormal dexamethasone suppression test was found in two participants with elevated urinary free cortisol at the time of recurrence, and two participants had confirmed abnormal late-night salivary cortisol. All three participants with elevated urinary free cortisol at the time of recurrence underwent therapy.

“This study has shown potential clinical benefit of either surgical or medical therapy in recurrent [Cushing’s disease] patients with elevations of [late-night salivary cortisol] and normal [urinary free cortisol],” the researchers wrote. “We believe that the outcomes observed in this retrospective case series suggest that the risk/benefit ratio of early treatment needs to undergo a more rigorous prospective evaluation utilizing [late-night salivary cortisol] elevation as an early biochemical marker of recurrent [Cushing’s disease].” – by Amber Cox

Disclosure: Carroll reports being a consultant for Corcept Therapeutics. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

From http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/online/%7B9ea4e4ed-6428-49b8-9b2a-11462cb21349%7D/elevated-late-night-salivary-cortisol-may-indicate-recurrent-cushings-disease

Patients with ARMC5 mutations: The NIH clinical experience

Screenshot 2016-05-27 13.12.55

 

Adrenal Disorders

R Correa, M Zilbermint, A Demidowich, F Faucz, A Berthon, J Bertherat, M Lodish, C Stratakis

Summary: Researchers conducted this study to describe the different phenotypical characteristics of patients with armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) mutations, located in 16p11.2 and a likely tumor-suppressor gene. They determined that patients with bilateral adrenal enlargement, found on imaging tests, should be screened for ARMC5 mutations, which are associated with subclinical Cushing’s syndrome (CS) and primary hyperaldosteronism (PA).

Methods:

  • Researchers identified 20 patients with ARMC5 mutations (germline and/or somatic) who were enrolled in a National Institutes of Health (NIH) protocol.
  • They obtained sociodemographic, clinical, laboratory, and radiological data for all participants.

Results:

  • Three families (with a total of 8 patients) were identified with ARMC5 germline mutations; the rest of the patients (13/20) had sporadic mutations.
  • The male to female ratio was 1.2:1; mean age was 48 years and 60% of patients were African American.
  • Forty percent of patients were diagnosed with CS, 20% with subclinical CS, 30% with hyperaldosteronism, and 10% had no diagnosis.
  • The mean serum cortisol (8 am) and Urinary Free Cortisol were 13.1 mcg/dl and 77 mcg/24 hours, respectively.
  • Nearly all patients (95%) had bilateral adrenal enlargement found on CT or MRI.
  • Patients underwent the following treatments: Bilateral adrenalectomy (45%), unilateral adrenalectomy (25%), medical treatment (20%), and no treatment (10%).
  • ARMC5 mutations are associated with primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PMAH) and are also seen in patients with PA, especially among African Americans.

From http://www.mdlinx.com/endocrinology/conference-abstract.cfm/ZZ37C4C5D3BF1A4FAE9C479A696660535B/57884/?utm_source=confcoveragenl&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_content=abstract-list&utm_campaign=abstract-AACE2016&nonus=0

Osilodrostat for Cushing’s

The study looked at a drug to treat Cushing’s disease. The article, in the journal Pituitary, is called Osilodrostat, a potent oral 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor: 22-week, prospective, Phase II study in Cushing’s disease.
Fleseriu M, Pivonello R, Young J, Hamrahian AH, Molitch ME, Shimizu C, Tanaka T, Shimatsu A, White T, Hilliard A, Tian C, Sauter N, Biller BM, Bertagna X.
Pituitary. 2015 Nov 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

PURPOSE:
In a 10-week proof-of-concept study (LINC 1), the potent oral 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor osilodrostat (LCI699) normalized urinary free cortisol (UFC) in 11/12 patients with Cushing’s disease. The current 22-week study (LINC 2; NCT01331239) further evaluated osilodrostat in patients with Cushing’s disease.

METHODS:
Phase II, open-label, prospective study of two patient cohorts. Follow-up cohort: 4/12 patients previously enrolled in LINC 1, offered re-enrollment if baseline mean UFC was above ULN. Expansion cohort: 15 newly enrolled patients with baseline UFC > 1.5 × ULN. In the follow-up cohort, patients initiated osilodrostat twice daily at the penultimate efficacious/tolerable dose in LINC 1; dose was adjusted as needed. In the expansion cohort, osilodrostat was initiated at 4 mg/day (10 mg/day if baseline UFC > 3 × ULN), with dose escalated every 2 weeks to 10, 20, 40, and 60 mg/day until UFC ≤ ULN. Main efficacy endpoint was the proportion of responders (UFC ≤ ULN or ≥50 % decrease from baseline) at weeks 10 and 22.

RESULTS:
Overall response rate was 89.5 % (n/N = 17/19) at 10 weeks and 78.9 % (n/N = 15/19) at 22 weeks; at week 22, all responding patients had UFC ≤ ULN. The most common AEs observed during osilodrostat treatment were nausea, diarrhea, asthenia, and adrenal insufficiency (n = 6 for each). New or worsening hirsutism (n = 2) and/or acne (n = 3) were reported among four female patients, all of whom had increased testosterone levels.

CONCLUSIONS:
Osilodrostat treatment reduced UFC in all patients; 78.9 % (n/N = 15/19) had normal UFC at week 22. Treatment with osilodrostat was generally well tolerated.

KEYWORDS:
11β-hydroxylase; Cortisol; Cushing’s; LCI699; Osilodrostat

Unilateral andrenalectomy may be valid first-line treatment for Cushing’s syndrome

Debillon E, et al. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015;doi:10.1210/jc.2015-2662.

In patients with evident Cushing’s syndrome related to primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia, unilateral adrenalectomy of the large gland appears to be a suitable alternative to bilateral adrenalectomy as a first-line treatment, according to recent findings.

Unilateral adrenalectomy yielded normalized urinary free cortisol and improved Cushing’s syndrome, according to the researchers.

Olivier Chabre , MD, PhD, of the Service d’Endocrinologie-Diabétologie-Nutrition in France, and colleagues evaluated all patients (n = 15) with overt Cushing’s syndrome related to primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia who underwent unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy of the larger gland between 2001 and 2015. Patients were seen for clinical and biological follow-up assessments at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively, 5 years after surgery and at the time of the last available urinary free cortisol measurement.

The study’s primary outcome measures were pre- and postoperative levels of urinary free cortisol, plasma cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), BMI, blood pressure, plasma glucose and lipids and measurements of these values on follow-up assessments. Patients were followed for a median of 60 months.

The researchers found that in early postoperative measurements, all 15 patients who underwent unilateral adrenalectomy achieved normal or low urinary free cortisol. Between 7 days and 1 month, there was a decrease in median urinary free cortisol from 2.19 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) at baseline to 0.27 ULN (P = .001). At 1 month, only one patient had elevated urinary free cortisol, and this patient went into remission by month 3 and continued to be in remission after 12 years of follow-up.

Forty percent of the patients developed adrenal insufficiency after unilateral adrenalectomy and latent adrenal insufficiency could not be excluded in two of the other patients. No predictors of postoperative adrenal insufficiency were identified.

Six of the patients had diabetes before unilateral adrenalectomy surgery; four of those were treated with antidiabetes drugs. At 12 months, only two of these patients had a continued need for antidiabetes drugs and had reductions in HbA1c despite decreases in their treatment. Recurrence occurred in two patients, demonstrating urinary free cortisol above the ULN at 7 years postoperatively and 8 years postoperatively. Both cases required treatment with mitotane, and in one of the patients, adrenalectomy of the second gland was required 9 years after the initial adrenalectomy.

According to the researchers, postoperative management and vigilant follow-up is needed in order to monitor patients for the risk for adrenal insufficiency.

“Further prospective studies are needed to better evaluate the long-term benefits of [unilateral adrenalectomy], which has one major benefit over [bilateral adrenalectomy]: if needed, [unilateral adrenalectomy] can be transformed in [bilateral adrenalectomy], while the opposite is obviously not true,” the researchers wrote. “One could propose that in further prospective studies [bilateral adrenalectomy] could be performed only if [unilateral adrenalectomy] fails to normalize [urinary free cortisol] at 1 month postoperatively.” – by Jennifer Byrne

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

From Healio

%d bloggers like this: