Cushing’s Syndrome Revealing Carney Complex: A Case Report

 

Carney complex (CNC) is a rare multisystem disorder, inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and characterized by distinctive spotty skin pigmentation, myxomas and endocrine abnormalities.

We report a case of a 35-year-old patient diagnosed with Cushing’s syndrome complicated with an impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and a severe psychiatric disturbance. The diagnosis of CNC was made by having two major criteria, namely a primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease (PPNAD) and thyroid carcinoma.

Read the entire report here: Cushing’s Syndrome Revealing Carney Complex: A Case
Report

Delayed diagnosis, barriers to care increase morbidity in children with Cushing’s syndrome

Hispanic and black children diagnosed with Cushing’s syndrome are more likely to present with higher cortisol measurements and larger tumor size vs. white children, according to study findings presented at the annual Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in Baltimore.

“Racial and socioeconomic disparities may contribute to the severity of disease presentation for children with Cushing’s [syndrome],” Alexandra Gkourogianni, MD, of the section on endocrinology and genetics at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and colleagues wrote. “Minority children from disadvantaged backgrounds present more frequently with comorbidities associated with longstanding [Cushing’s syndrome].”

Gkourogianni and colleagues analyzed data from 135 children treated for Cushing’s syndrome (transsphenoidal surgery) at the NIH between 1997 and 2015 (mean age, 13 years; 51% girls; 33% Hispanic or black). Researchers used a 10-point index for rating severity in pediatric Cushing’s syndrome based on predefined cutoffs; degree of hypercortisolemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and hypertension were graded on a 3-point scale (0-2); height, BMI z scores, duration of disease, and tumor invasion were graded on a 2-point scale (0-1).

Researchers found that midnight cortisol measurements were higher among Hispanic and black children vs. white children (23.3 µg/dL vs. 16 µg/dL; P = .019), as were tumor sizes (mean 6.3 mm vs. 3.3 mm; P = .016). Height standard deviation score was more severely affected in black and Hispanic children (–1.6 vs. –1.1; P = .038), and mean Cushing’s syndrome score for Hispanic and black children was higher vs. white children (4.5 vs. 3.8; P = .033).

Researchers found that median income had an independent correlation with Cushing’s syndrome score in univariate regression analysis for covariates of socioeconomic status and demographics (P = .025). Multivariable regression analysis using race, prevalence of obesity, estimated income, access to pediatric endocrinologist, age and sex confirmed that race, along with lower socioeconomic status and older age, were predictors of a higher Cushing’s syndrome score (P = .002).

“We speculate that delayed diagnosis, barriers to access to care and poorer quality health care for these underserved patients may contribute to presentation at a later age and increased morbidity,” the researchers wrote. “Additional research is needed to identify potential modifiable factors that may improve care for these patients.” – by Regina Schaffer

Reference:

Gkourogianni A, et al. Poster #445. Presented at: Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting; April 30- May 3, 2016; Baltimore.

Disclosure: Endocrine Today was unable to determine relevant financial disclosures.

From http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/online/%7Be79d7c84-d539-4a04-a548-882b9f4caadd%7D/delayed-diagnosis-barriers-to-care-increase-morbidity-in-children-with-cushings-syndrome

Is Diabetes in Cushing’s Syndrome a Consequence of Hypercortisolism?

Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Nov 19. [Epub ahead of print]

Is Diabetes in Cushing syndrome only a consequence of hypercortisolism?

Source

C Giordano, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Specialistica (Di.Bi.Mi.S) Sezione di Endocrinologia e Malattie del Metabolismo, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most frequent complications of Cushing syndrome (CS). Aim of the study was to define the changes in insulin sensitivity and/or secretion in relation to glucose tolerance categories in newly diagnosed CS patients.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study on 140 patients with CS.

METHODS:

113 women (80 with pituitary disease and 33 with adrenal disease, aged 41.7±15.7 yr) and 27 men (19 with pituitary disease and 8 with adrenal disease, aged 38.1±20.01 yr) at diagnosis were divided according to glucose tolerance into normal glucose tolerance (CS/NGT), impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance (CS/prediabetes) and diabetes (CS/DM).

RESULTS:

71 patients belonged to CS/NGT (49.3%), 26 (18.5%) to CS/prediabetes and 43 (30.8%) to CS/DM. Significant increasing trends in the prevalence of family history of diabetes (p<0.001), metabolic syndrome (p<0.001), age (p<0.001) and waist circumference (p=0.043) and decreasing trends in HOMAβ (p<0.001)and Oral Dispositional Index (DIo) (p<0.002) were observed among the groups. No significant trend in fasting insulin, AUC INS, ISI-Matsuda and VAI was detected.

CONCLUSIONS:

Impairment of glucose tolerance is characterized by the inability of β-cells to adequately compensate insulin resistance through increased insulin secretion. Age, genetic predisposition and lifestyle, in combination with duration and degree of hypercortisolism, strongly contribute to the impairment of glucose tolerance in the natural history of CS. A careful phenotypic evaluation of glucose tolerance defects in patients with CS proves useful for the identification of patients at high risk for metabolic complications.

PMID:
24255133
[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]
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