Delayed diagnosis, barriers to care increase morbidity in children with Cushing’s syndrome

Hispanic and black children diagnosed with Cushing’s syndrome are more likely to present with higher cortisol measurements and larger tumor size vs. white children, according to study findings presented at the annual Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in Baltimore.

“Racial and socioeconomic disparities may contribute to the severity of disease presentation for children with Cushing’s [syndrome],” Alexandra Gkourogianni, MD, of the section on endocrinology and genetics at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and colleagues wrote. “Minority children from disadvantaged backgrounds present more frequently with comorbidities associated with longstanding [Cushing’s syndrome].”

Gkourogianni and colleagues analyzed data from 135 children treated for Cushing’s syndrome (transsphenoidal surgery) at the NIH between 1997 and 2015 (mean age, 13 years; 51% girls; 33% Hispanic or black). Researchers used a 10-point index for rating severity in pediatric Cushing’s syndrome based on predefined cutoffs; degree of hypercortisolemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and hypertension were graded on a 3-point scale (0-2); height, BMI z scores, duration of disease, and tumor invasion were graded on a 2-point scale (0-1).

Researchers found that midnight cortisol measurements were higher among Hispanic and black children vs. white children (23.3 µg/dL vs. 16 µg/dL; P = .019), as were tumor sizes (mean 6.3 mm vs. 3.3 mm; P = .016). Height standard deviation score was more severely affected in black and Hispanic children (–1.6 vs. –1.1; P = .038), and mean Cushing’s syndrome score for Hispanic and black children was higher vs. white children (4.5 vs. 3.8; P = .033).

Researchers found that median income had an independent correlation with Cushing’s syndrome score in univariate regression analysis for covariates of socioeconomic status and demographics (P = .025). Multivariable regression analysis using race, prevalence of obesity, estimated income, access to pediatric endocrinologist, age and sex confirmed that race, along with lower socioeconomic status and older age, were predictors of a higher Cushing’s syndrome score (P = .002).

“We speculate that delayed diagnosis, barriers to access to care and poorer quality health care for these underserved patients may contribute to presentation at a later age and increased morbidity,” the researchers wrote. “Additional research is needed to identify potential modifiable factors that may improve care for these patients.” – by Regina Schaffer

Reference:

Gkourogianni A, et al. Poster #445. Presented at: Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting; April 30- May 3, 2016; Baltimore.

Disclosure: Endocrine Today was unable to determine relevant financial disclosures.

From http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/online/%7Be79d7c84-d539-4a04-a548-882b9f4caadd%7D/delayed-diagnosis-barriers-to-care-increase-morbidity-in-children-with-cushings-syndrome

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