Is Diabetes in Cushing’s Syndrome a Consequence of Hypercortisolism?

Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Nov 19. [Epub ahead of print]

Is Diabetes in Cushing syndrome only a consequence of hypercortisolism?

Source

C Giordano, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Specialistica (Di.Bi.Mi.S) Sezione di Endocrinologia e Malattie del Metabolismo, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most frequent complications of Cushing syndrome (CS). Aim of the study was to define the changes in insulin sensitivity and/or secretion in relation to glucose tolerance categories in newly diagnosed CS patients.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study on 140 patients with CS.

METHODS:

113 women (80 with pituitary disease and 33 with adrenal disease, aged 41.7±15.7 yr) and 27 men (19 with pituitary disease and 8 with adrenal disease, aged 38.1±20.01 yr) at diagnosis were divided according to glucose tolerance into normal glucose tolerance (CS/NGT), impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance (CS/prediabetes) and diabetes (CS/DM).

RESULTS:

71 patients belonged to CS/NGT (49.3%), 26 (18.5%) to CS/prediabetes and 43 (30.8%) to CS/DM. Significant increasing trends in the prevalence of family history of diabetes (p<0.001), metabolic syndrome (p<0.001), age (p<0.001) and waist circumference (p=0.043) and decreasing trends in HOMAβ (p<0.001)and Oral Dispositional Index (DIo) (p<0.002) were observed among the groups. No significant trend in fasting insulin, AUC INS, ISI-Matsuda and VAI was detected.

CONCLUSIONS:

Impairment of glucose tolerance is characterized by the inability of β-cells to adequately compensate insulin resistance through increased insulin secretion. Age, genetic predisposition and lifestyle, in combination with duration and degree of hypercortisolism, strongly contribute to the impairment of glucose tolerance in the natural history of CS. A careful phenotypic evaluation of glucose tolerance defects in patients with CS proves useful for the identification of patients at high risk for metabolic complications.

PMID:
24255133
[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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