Irreversible Effects of Previous Cortisol Excess on Cognitive Functions in Cushing’s Disease | Laika’s MedLibLog

Irreversible Effects of Previous Cortisol Excess on Cognitive Functions in Cushing’s Disease | Laika’s MedLibLog.

If we listen to Cushing patients, who are “cured” and have traded Cushing’s disease for Addison’s disease, we notice that they feel better after their high levels of cortisol have normalized, but not fully cured (see two examples of ex-Cushing patients with longlasting if not irreversible health) problems in my previous post here. [added 2010-04-17)

To realize how this affects daily life, I recommend to read the photo-blog 365 days with Cushing by Robin (also author of Survive the Journey). Quite a few of her posts deal with the continuous weakness (tag muscle atrophy), tiredness (tag fatigue), problems with (short-term) memory (see tag memory)  or both (like here and here).

Scientifically the question is to which extent ex-Cushing patients score worse than other healthy individuals or chronically ill people and, if so, whether this can be attributed to the previous high levels of glucocorticoids….

via Irreversible Effects of Previous Cortisol Excess on Cognitive Functions in Cushing’s Disease | Laika’s MedLibLog.

Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 17

robin-causes

Another of Robin’s wonderful images.

A similar image from the CushieWiki

cushings-causes

No wonder Cushing’s is so hard to diagnose!

maryo colorful zebra

Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 16

robin-support

That’s for sure!  Cushing’s patients have a lot of support these days, at least online.  I’m not seeing much offline in the way of regular group support meetings.

Over the years, there have been lots of local meetings but they’re mostly one-time events.  There are pictures of some of the past meetings here: https://www.facebook.com/CushingsInfo/photos_albums listed by place and date.

Many Cushing’s patients on the message boards and in Facebook groups exchange phone numbers and email addresses to get offline support.

Other ways to help support others you may never meet are to agree to be interviewed in a live voice chat (these are added to the podcast for later listening) or submit a bio.

The more you share, the more support others get…and the more they’ll share with you.

 

 

maryo colorful zebra

 

Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 15

robin-dontsay

A continuation of the last post with another of Robin’s great images.  I’ve also heard many of these comments.

I did have #6, cancer – kidney cancer or renal cell carcinoma – in 2006 and the diagnosis was much faster/easier than Cushing’s.  My cancer diagnosis took about an hour in the emergency room.  Cushing’s took about 5 years or so.  Cancer surgery recovery was faster with fewer long-term consequences.

When I told people I had cancer, everyone understood.  When I told them I had Cushing’s, no one did.

That being said, I don’t recommend getting either cancer or Cushing’s!

 

maryo colorful zebra

Cushing’s Awareness Challenge: Day 14

robin-dont-say

Boy, I heard all of these except Number 4.  In the early 1908’s, we had no Internet yet.

I spent my time looking up things in medical texts at the library,  Most were far too advanced for me but I made Xerox copies (remember those?) and brought them home to read and try to understand.

I still have all my copied information, all saved in my “Cushing’s box”.  Most of it is probably outdated now.

Another thing that I DID hear, from my DH no less was to just think “happy thoughts” and it would all go away.

The thoughts I was thinking were not happy and it took a major surgery for it to go away.  Even then, it didn’t all go away.  GRRR

maryo colorful zebra

%d bloggers like this: