Other Diseases

forums

Many of the people who post on the message boards suffer from other diseases, as well as Cushing’s. These links help to provide some information about these diseases.

~A ~

Acanthosis nigricans
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Acromegaly
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Addison’s Disease
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Adrenoleukodystrophy
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~B ~

Barrett’s esophagus


~C ~

Carney Complex
This Topic on the Message Boards.
New Support Group for Carney Complex.

Central Serous Retinopathy
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH)
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Conn’s Syndrome
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Craniopharyngioma
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~D ~

Diabetes insipidus
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~E ~

Ectopic ACTH Syndrome
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Empty Sella
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~F ~

Fibromyalgia
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~G ~

Gigantism
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~H ~

Hirsuitism
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Hyperprolactinemia
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Hyperthyroidism
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Hypoalderostonism
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Hypocalcemia
This Topic on the Message Boards

Hypopituitarism
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Hypothyroidism
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~I ~

Insulin Resistance
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~K ~

Kidney Disease
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~L ~

Lyme Disease
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~M ~

Madelung’s Disease
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Menopause
This Topic on the Message Boards.

MEN Type 1
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Myasthenia Gravis
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~N ~

Nelson’s Syndrome
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~O ~

Osteopenia
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Osteoporosis
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~P ~

Panhypopituitarism
This Topic on the Message Boards.

PCOS
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Perimenopause
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Pheochromocytoma
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Pituitary dwarfism
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Premature menopause
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD)
This topic on the Message Boards

Prolactinoma
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Pseudo Cushing’s
This Topic on the Message Boards


~R ~

Rathke’s cleft cyst
This Topic on the Message Boards.

ROHHAD (Rapid-Onset Obesity With Hypothalamic Dysfunction, Hypoventilation, and Autonomic Dysregulation Presenting in Childhood)
This Topic on the Message Boards


~S ~

Sheehan’s Syndrome
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Stein-Leventhal Syndrome
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~T ~

Thymoma
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Thyroid Gland Disorders
This Topic on the Message Boards.

Turner’s Syndrome
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~V ~

Von Hippel-Lindau disease
This Topic on the Message Boards.


~Z ~

Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Beta-O2’s ßAir Bio-artificial Adrenal Device Shows Potential to Treat Adrenocortical Insufficiency and Other Stress-related Disorders

ROSH HAAYIN, Israel, February 19, 2015 /PRNewswire/ —

Beta-O2 announced today the results of a series of pre-clinical studies demonstrating that the company’s ßAir Bio-artificial Adrenal device could offer a treatment for adrenocortical insufficiency and other stress-related disorders. The results are published in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS). PNAS is one of the world’s most-cited and comprehensive multidisciplinary scientific journals, publishing more than 3,800 research papers annually.

The article, titled “Transplantation of bovine adrenocortical encapsulated in alginate can be viewed here .

The studies cited in the article were led by Professor Stefan Bornstein and Dr. Mariya Balyura at University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus Dresden.

Professor Bornstein said, “The Bio-artificial Adrenal supersedes an immunosuppression completely. The donor cells will be protected against the immune system responses of the patient. The system lets hormones pass the half-permeable walls into the body of the receiver. Our vision is that people in the future may even receive adrenal cells from another species, as, for example, from the pig. The device creates the biotechnical conditions for it.”

Professor Bornstein continued, “I am convinced that Beta-O2’s ßAir Bio-artificial Adrenal device will revolutionize the therapy of adrenocortical insufficiency. Many more patients could benefit from transplantation because the recipients wouldn’t need any immunosuppressive drugs, at all.”

ßAir is an implantable device that provides immune protection and optimal living conditions for cells implanted within it. It has thus far proven successful in providing a viable environment for islets of Langerhans or beta cells, to thrive and naturally produce insulin on demand, a necessary function missing in people with type 1 diabetes. The product for type 1 diabetes is called the ‘ßAir Bio-artificial Pancreas’. Three patients are currently implanted with the ßAir Bio-artificial Pancreas as part of an ongoing clinical study in Sweden.

“The news today indicates that the same immune protection system being used to treat type 1 diabetes patients in the clinical trial in Sweden, also appears to work well for other types of functional cells, such as adrenal cells. We found that when placed in the ßAir, the life span of the adrenal cells significantly increased. The capacity of the adrenal cells for stable, long-term basal hormone release significantly improved as well, as did their response to various stimulating hormones. Additionally, as described in the PNAS article, we learned that ßAir has xeno transplantation or cross species capabilities. For example, using the ßAir, pig adrenal cells can be transplanted into a living being other than a pig and still remain healthy and function properly,” said Dr. Dan J. Gelvan, chairman of the board of Beta-O2.

Dr. Gelvan continued, “What all this means is that transplantation of a ‘ßAir Bio-artificial Adrenal’ with cells from another species could prove to be a treatment option for patients with adrenocortical insufficiency and other stress-related disorders. This is important because current treatment options for adrenal insufficiency are limited and have unpleasant side effects. The study findings reported in the PNAS article are also significant as they offer a sneak preview of the huge potential of ßAIR. If it can provide a viable environment for many different types of cells, then ultimately it may be prove to afford an effective treatment, if not a cure, for a long list of illnesses.”

About Beta-O2 Technologies Ltd.

Beta-O2 Technologies Ltd. is a biomedical company developing a proprietary implantable bioreactor, the ßAir. The company’s flagship product is called the ßAir Bio-artificial Pancreas. It is in development as a treatment and potential cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D). ßAir was first designed to address the main problems of the otherwise successful procedures in which islets of Langerhans (i.e. pancreatic endocrine cells) are transplanted in diabetic patients, such as the need for life-long immunosuppressive pharmacological treatment and limited functionality of the transplanted islets over time due to an insufficient oxygen supply. The company’s second pipeline product is the ßAir Bio-artificial Adrenal for the treatment of adrenocortical insufficiency and other stress-related disorders. This product is currently at the pre-clinical stage of development. Beta-O2 investors include Aurum Ventures, Sherpa Innoventures, SCP Vitalife Partners, Pitango Venture Capital and Saints Capital.

For more information, please visit http://www.beta-o2.com .

Press contact:
Marjie Hadad
MH Communications
+972-54-536-5220
marjie@netvision.net.il

 

SOURCE Beta-O2 Technologies Ltd

Cushing’s Email Newsletters?

newsletters

 

Cushing’s folks –  would you be interested in occasional email newsletters returning?

If five or more people are interested, we’ll try this again.  I think it’s been a couple years since the last email newsletters were sent out.

If you are interested, please sign up here.  If the form takes too long to send, please email me.

NO SPAM will be sent.

Thanks!

Depressed? Anxious? It Could Be An Early Symptom Of These Illnesses

In the January 2015 edition of Psychotherapy and Psychsomatics, a group of Italian researchers explored whether depression, anxiety, and other psychiatric mood disorders might be early symptoms of medical disorders, as opposed to being “just” psychological symptoms.

Their research showed that depression in particular can be a strong indicator of other forms of illness, finding it “to be the most common affective prodrome [early symptom] of medical disorders and was consistently reported in Cushing’s syndrome, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, pancreatic and lung cancer, myocardial infarction, Wilson’s disease, and AIDS.”

Read the entire article here: Depressed? Anxious? It Could Be An Early Symptom Of These Illnesses.

Myth: Even Though You Are Chronically Ill, You Should Have The Same Amount Of Energy Every Day,,,

myth-busted

 

Myth: Even though you are chronically ill, you should have the same amount of energy every day. “You look SO good and you went to that party last month! Why can’t you come to MY party?!” When you say you are not well enough to do something, you are just making excuses. You could do it, just like you did that other thing; you are just choosing not to!

 

Fact: You may have heard me talk about “The Spoon Theory”. It was created by someone named Christine Miserandino, to explain the experience of someone with chronic illness in terms of using energy to live and to complete tasks every day. Though the myth assumes that one should have the same amount of energy all the time; the fact is that energy levels fluctuate and people who are chronically ill must make conscious decisions about what they can spend their energy on.

Christine Miserandino (2010) uses the spoon theory to answer the question, “What does it feel like to be sick?” The spoons serve as a symbol for resources available and energy spent to get through every moment of every day. Miserandino states that “The difference in being sick and being healthy is having to make choices or to consciously think about things when the rest of the world doesn’t have to”. Most people who get sick feel a loss of a life they once knew. When you are healthy, you expect to have a never ending supply of spoons. But, when you are not well, you need to count your spoons to keep track and you can never forget about it or take it for granted. Each task costs a spoon and each spoon is not to be taken for granted. Miserandino (2010) asks, “Do you know how many spoons people waste every day?”

Patients use the metaphor of a banking system. In this system, patients must make a withdrawal of a spoon every time they complete a task. Cushing’s and Adrenal Insufficiency patients talk about the “Cortisol Bank” metaphor. The concept is the same and the idea is that certain stressors and/or tasks cause one’s body to make a cortisol withdrawal from the body. Bad things happen when there is a cortisol deficit, meaning that there is not enough cortisol in the body for one to live everyday because of the amount of cortisol that has already been used up. If a person continues to draw from the bank on an account that is already negative, the situation can become worse and worse as each day passes.

Something needs to happen in order to start making appropriate deposits. This can include, taking more medication (stress dosing or an emergency shot), resting, getting adequate physical and emotional support and help, and saying “NO!”. Even when in a deficit, many patients have a difficult time saying “no” to an invitation to an event, completing a task, or engaging someone in a way that will use up more energy because of their fear of their loved one’s reactions. Much of the time, this fear is warranted because of the actual reactions they have received. Ever heard, “But you volunteered for the bake sale last week! You must be better! Why can’t you come to church this week?!”. You may have heard something similar.

It is important for loved ones to understand the amount of “spoons” it takes for a chronically ill person just to get through every single day. EVERYTHING costs spoons! The amount of spoons paid by each person varies from person to person. It all depends on that individual’s situation, body, level of illness, etc. What is common for all, though, is that spoons must be used and eventually those spoons run out. In order to avoid becoming sick or to recuperate from getting sick, the chronically ill patient must evaluate how he/she will use spoons and what tasks can be feasibly completed that day or week. Please understand that when the chronically ill patient says, “YES” to you; he/she is making a conscious choice to use up spoons to meet your need, request, or demand. Talking on the phone, going out to lunch, making dinner, coming to your event all required a sacrifice of another task that day or week. Your friend may have come to lunch with you but that required that she skipped washing the dishes that day or washing her hair, or is even giving up doing something important the next day. Instead of being angry at your friend, please consider why the request is denied at times.

spoons-mythsRefer to the attached picture. This is not an exact science but gives some idea of the spoon bank. If you have time, try doing this exercise: Lay out 8-12 physical spoons. As you complete certain tasks throughout the day, use this chart to subtract spoons from your pile.

Each and every thing requires a spoon. Taking a shower, washing your hair, cooking, cleaning, watching a movie, going out to lunch, working, writing this post (Ha)! When you are done with your day, notice how many spoons you have left. Observe your feelings after this exercise. You can even do it for a week. Lay out a certain amount of spoons for every day for seven days. If you go into a deficit, borrow spoons from the following day. However, if you do borrow spoons; you must take away a task that you WERE planning to originally do that day. Notice what happens and notice how you feel at the end of the week.

You can view “The Spoon Theory” in its entirety at: http://www.butyoudontlooksick.com/articles/written-by-christine/the-spoon-theory/

Can you think of any other tasks that are not on this chart? Help our friends who are doing the activity. List those tasks and assign how many spoons each task will require.
Spoon Bank
Get out of bed- 1 Spoon
Shower- 2 Spoons
Attend Special Event- 5 Spoons
Go out for Coffee- 4 Spoons
Drive- 4 Spoons
Make a Phone Call- 3 Spoons
Work- 5 spoons
Play Games-3 Spoons
Clean the House- 5 Spoons
Have a Meal- 2 Spoons
Walk the Dog- 4 Spoons
Study- 5 Spoons
Watch TV- 3 Spoons
Ironing- 5 Spoons
Exercise- 4 Spoons
Shopping- 4 Spoons
Read- 2 Spoons
Catch Public Transport- 4 Spoons
Cook- 4 Spoons

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