Rare Nasal Cancer May Have Caused Cushing’s Syndrome

A very rare case of Cushing’s syndrome developing as a result of a large and also rare cancer of the nasal sinuses gives insights into how to screen and treat such an anomaly, of which fewer than 25 cases have been reported in literature.

Paraneoplastic esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB), a very rare type of nasal tumor, may sometimes produce excess adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), leading to symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, according to a recent case report that describes a case of ACTH-secreting ENB. The report aims to demonstrate the importance of recognizing its pathophysiology and treatment.

The case report, “A Case of Cushing’s Syndrome due to Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Secretion from Esthesioneuroblastoma with Long Term Follow-Up after Resection,” was published in the journal Case Reports in Endocrinology.

It describes a 52-year-old Caucasian male who had a history of high blood pressure, severe weakness, abnormal production of urine, extreme thirstiness, and confusion.

He was scheduled to undergo surgery for a 7-centimeter skull base mass; the surgery was postponed due to severe high serum potassium concentrations and abnormally high pH levels. His plasma ACTH levels also were elevated and Cushing’s syndrome was suspected. Since imaging of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis did not show any ectopic (abnormal) sources of ACTH, the ENB was suspected to be the source.

Surgery was performed to remove the tumor, which was later found to be secreting ACTH. Consequently, following the procedure, his ACTH levels dropped to normal (below detection limit) and he did not need medication to normalize serum potassium levels. He then underwent subsequent chemoradiation and has shown no sign of recurrence 30 months after the operation, which is considered to be one of the longest follow-up periods for such a case.

Researchers declared it “a case of olfactory neuroblastoma with ectopic ACTH secretion that was treated with resection and adjuvant chemoradiation.”

“Given the paucity of this diagnosis, little is known about how best to treat these patients and how best to screen for complications such as adrenal insufficiency and follow-up,” they wrote. “Our case adds more data for better understanding of this disease.”

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/04/03/rare-nasal-cancer-caused-cushings-syndrome-case-report-says/

Interview with Deborah March 30, 2016

Deborah has many symptoms but is not yet diagnosed.

interview

Deborah will be our guest in an interview on BlogTalk Radio  Wednesday, March 30 at 6:00 PM eastern.  The Call-In number for questions or comments is (845) 241-9850.

The archived interview will be available after 7:00 PM Eastern through iTunes Podcasts (Cushie Chats) or BlogTalkRadio.  While you’re waiting, there are currently 89 other past interviews to listen to!

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Deborah’s Bio:

Hello all,

I do not know where to begin. For many years I have been struggling with these symptoms. I have proximal weakness, intolerance to stress, blood pressure fluctuations, hyperpigmentation, reactive hypoglycemia, sweating, severe dehydration, very bad confusion, vision, memory problems, physical body changes (hump, bruises), carb intolerance, and inability to exercise.

My endocrinologist did a workup for Cushing’s disease and the midnight saliva test was high. She brushed it off as “stress”. I am seeing a doctor now that says I have POTS and Dysautonomia. My doctor says I have inappropriate adrenaline rushes.

My body is falling apart because I haven’t found a doctor who will take my symptoms and test results serious. I would like to talk to others who are having trouble getting diagnosed and also to those who have gotten diagnosed who have a good doctor.

God Bless and Thank You,
Deborah

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