Rare Nasal Cancer May Have Caused Cushing’s Syndrome

A very rare case of Cushing’s syndrome developing as a result of a large and also rare cancer of the nasal sinuses gives insights into how to screen and treat such an anomaly, of which fewer than 25 cases have been reported in literature.

Paraneoplastic esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB), a very rare type of nasal tumor, may sometimes produce excess adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), leading to symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, according to a recent case report that describes a case of ACTH-secreting ENB. The report aims to demonstrate the importance of recognizing its pathophysiology and treatment.

The case report, “A Case of Cushing’s Syndrome due to Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Secretion from Esthesioneuroblastoma with Long Term Follow-Up after Resection,” was published in the journal Case Reports in Endocrinology.

It describes a 52-year-old Caucasian male who had a history of high blood pressure, severe weakness, abnormal production of urine, extreme thirstiness, and confusion.

He was scheduled to undergo surgery for a 7-centimeter skull base mass; the surgery was postponed due to severe high serum potassium concentrations and abnormally high pH levels. His plasma ACTH levels also were elevated and Cushing’s syndrome was suspected. Since imaging of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis did not show any ectopic (abnormal) sources of ACTH, the ENB was suspected to be the source.

Surgery was performed to remove the tumor, which was later found to be secreting ACTH. Consequently, following the procedure, his ACTH levels dropped to normal (below detection limit) and he did not need medication to normalize serum potassium levels. He then underwent subsequent chemoradiation and has shown no sign of recurrence 30 months after the operation, which is considered to be one of the longest follow-up periods for such a case.

Researchers declared it “a case of olfactory neuroblastoma with ectopic ACTH secretion that was treated with resection and adjuvant chemoradiation.”

“Given the paucity of this diagnosis, little is known about how best to treat these patients and how best to screen for complications such as adrenal insufficiency and follow-up,” they wrote. “Our case adds more data for better understanding of this disease.”

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2018/04/03/rare-nasal-cancer-caused-cushings-syndrome-case-report-says/

Metabolomic Biomarkers in Urine of Cushing’s Syndrome Patients

Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 294; doi:10.3390/ijms18020294 (registering DOI)
Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Gdańsk, Al. Gen. J. Hallera 107, 80-416 Gdańsk, Poland
Laboratory of Environmental Chemometrics, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdańsk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-308 Gdańsk, Poland
Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Medical University of Gdańsk, ul. Dębinki 7, 80-211 Gdańsk, Poland
Department ofEnvironmental Analytics, Institute for Environmental and Human Health Protection, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdańsk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-308 Gdańsk, Poland
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ting-Li (Morgan) Han
Received: 5 December 2016 / Revised: 9 January 2017 / Accepted: 19 January 2017 / Published: 29 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Diagnostics)
Download PDF [1853 KB, uploaded 29 January 2017]

Abstract

Cushing’s syndrome (CS) is a disease which results from excessive levels of cortisol in the human body. The disorder is associated with various signs and symptoms which are also common for the general population not suffering from compound hypersecretion. Thus, more sensitive and selective methods are required for the diagnosis of CS.

This follow-up study was conducted to determine which steroid metabolites could serve as potential indicators of CS and possible subclinical hypercortisolism in patients diagnosed with so called non-functioning adrenal incidentalomas (AIs).

Urine samples from negative controls (n = 37), patients with CS characterized by hypercortisolism and excluding iatrogenic CS (n = 16), and patients with non-functioning AIs with possible subclinical Cushing’s syndrome (n = 25) were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatograph equipped with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). Statistical and multivariate methods were applied to investigate the profile differences between examined individuals. The analyses revealed hormonal differences between patients with CS and the rest of examined individuals.

The concentrations of selected metabolites of cortisol, androgens, and pregnenetriol were elevated whereas the levels of tetrahydrocortisone were decreased for CS when opposed to the rest of the study population. Moreover, after analysis of potential confounding factors, it was also possible to distinguish six steroid hormones which discriminated CS patients from other study subjects.

The obtained discriminant functions enabled classification of CS patients and AI group characterized by mild hypersecretion of cortisol metabolites. It can be concluded that steroid hormones selected by applying urinary profiling may serve the role of potential biomarkers of CS and can aid in its early diagnosis.

 

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

From http://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/18/2/294

Hair Analysis Provides a Historical Record of Cortisol Levels in Cushing’s Syndrome

Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2010 Sep 24.
Published in final edited form as:
PMCID: PMC2945912
NIHMSID: NIHMS235640
Hair Analysis Provides a Historical Record of Cortisol Levels in Cushing’s Syndrome

Abstract

The severity of Cushing’s Syndrome (CS) depends on the duration and extent of the exposure to excess glucocorticoids. Current measurements of cortisol in serum, saliva and urine reflect systemic cortisol levels at the time of sample collection, but cannot assess past cortisol levels. Hair cortisol levels may be increased in patients with CS, and, as hair grows about 1 cm/month, measurement of hair cortisol may provide historical information on the development of hypercortisolism.

We attempted to measure cortisol in hair in relation to clinical course in six female patients with CS and in 32 healthy volunteers in 1 cm hair sections. Hair cortisol content was measured using a commercially available salivary cortisol immune assay with a protocol modified for use with hair.

Hair cortisol levels were higher in patients with CS than in controls, the medians (ranges) were 679 (279–2500) and 116 (26–204) ng/g respectively (P <0.001). Segmental hair analysis provided information for up to 18 months before time of sampling. Hair cortisol concentrations appeared to vary in accordance with the clinical course.

Based on these data, we suggest that hair cortisol measurement is a novel method for assessing dynamic systemic cortisol exposure and provides unique historical information on variation in cortisol, and that more research is required to fully understand the utility and limits of this technique.

Keywords: glucocorticoids, pituitary adenoma, cancer, adrenal gland, hormones, cushing hair

Clinical Trial for Cortendo

Cortendo Clinical Trial

 

About the Study

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study is to test the effects of different doses of COR-003 on people with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome, primarily by measuring the cortisol levels in urine and secondarily by measuring other health parameters such as blood pressure, weight, liver function, etc. This study is also being conducted to find out if COR-003 is safe to use. This study is open-label, which means both the health providers and the participants in the study are aware of the drug or treatment being given.

STUDY DESIGN:

  • The study will begin with a screening period to make sure subjects are eligible to participate in the study.
  • After the screening period, subjects who are eligible for participation will each be given several different doses of COR-003, to be taken by mouth in tablet form.
  • After an individualized dose has been selected, participants will take COR-003 for 6 months.
  • Finally, participants will continue in the study for an additional 6 months at doses to be determined by the study doctor.
  • Throughout the study, participants will meet regularly with a study doctor and will take part in a variety of medical tests to make sure they are doing well and to see if COR-003 is working.
  • Participants in the study should be sure they have the time to participate. Participants will generally be followed for over a year.

See if you may be eligible for this clinical study. By providing your contact information, you will receive more information about the study and your eligibility.

About Cortendo

Cortendo is the sponsor of this study. This means Cortendo planned and organized this study. Cortendo will also collect and analyze the data from the study.

Cortendo is a global pharmaceutical company primarily focused on researching and providing treatments for rare diseases in endocrinology, such as Cushing’s syndrome. The company was founded in Sweden and its worldwide headquarters is located just outside of Philadelphia.

Fill out this form for more information: https://www.cushingssyndromestudy.com/registration.aspx

Research Study: An Open Label Study to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of COR-003 (2S, 4R-ketoconazole) in the Treatment of Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome

Objectives:         

The purpose of this study is to test the effects of different doses of COR-003 on people with Cushing’s syndrome (CS) primarily by measuring the cortisol levels in urine and secondarily by measuring other health parameters such as blood pressure, weight, and liver function. This study is also being conducted to see if there is any harm caused when using COR-003.

This study is an open label study. That means both the health providers and the participants in the study are aware of the drug or treatment being given.

Eligibility:

Adult Subjects (18 years or older) with elevated levels of cortisol due to endogenous CS.

Confirmed diagnosis of persistent or recurrent CS (with or without therapy) or newly diagnosed disease, if subjects are not candidates for surgery. CS will be defined according to the criteria in the guidelines for diagnosis of CS (Nieman 2008).

Women who are pregnant or lactating are not eligible for this study.

Individuals with other health conditions or diagnoses may not be eligible for this study.

These and other eligibility criteria are best reviewed with a doctor who is participating in the study. You can also get more detailed eligibility information about the study by clicking here to visit http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

Study Design:

  • The study will begin with a screening period to make sure subjects are eligible to participate in the study.
  • After the screening period, subjects who are eligible for participation will each be given several different doses of COR-003, to be taken orally in tablet form.
  • After an individualized dose has been selected, participants will take COR-003 for six months.
  • Finally, participants will continue in the study for an additional six months at doses to be determined by the study doctor.

 

Throughout the study, participants will meet regularly with a study doctor and will take part in a variety of medical tests to make sure they are doing well and to see if COR-003 is working.

Participants in the study should be sure they have the time to participate. Participants will generally be followed for over a year:

Study Locations

The study is currently taking place in several places around the world (United States, Belgium, France, Israel, Netherlands, Spain, and Sweden).
Additional information on the study can be found at clinicaltrials.gov through this link.

Study sponsor: Cortendo AB

For more information, please contact:

Jim Ellis at Cortendo AB tel: +1 (610) 254-9245 or jellis@cortendo.com

 

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