Some Lifestyle Tips for Cushing’s Syndrome

There are some ideas in the post below and some at http://www.cushings-info.com/index.php?title=Help_Yourself,_Part_1 (and also parts 2 and 3!)

Do you have any other helpful tips for the New Year?

Below is from https://www.endocrineweb.com/conditions/cushings-syndrome/4-lifestyle-tips-cushings-syndrome

As part of your overall Cushing’s syndrome treatment plan, there are some lifestyle tips you can incorporate to help you live well with Cushing’s syndrome.

Below are 4 lifestyle tips you can integrate into your recovery plan from Cushing’s syndrome. Have a conversation with your doctor before making any major changes, such as starting to exercise regularly.

  1. Eat smart. Make sure you’re eating nutritious foods. Of course, you should focus on eating fruits and vegetables, which are high in anti-oxidants, but also eat whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats. These foods fuel your body by giving you healthy doses of energy.

    Also, be sure you get enough calcium and vitamin D in your diet. These nutrients help strengthen bones (important because bone loss is common with people who have Cushing’s syndrome). If you don’t get enough of these in your diet, talk to your doctor about taking calcium and vitamin D supplements.

    A registered dietitian (RD) can help you create a balanced meal plan—the key word here is “balanced.” Yes, you can still eat the foods you love (in moderation), but it’s important to eat foods that boost your health. An RD can also help you lose extra weight you gained from Cushing’s syndrome.

  2. Exercise gently. Exercise plays a significant role in any healthy lifestyle, but it’s important for you not to rush into it. Even if you think you’re feeling better, your body still needs time to heal.

    Start off slowly-you may want to try low—impact exercise, such as water aerobics, tai chi, or yoga. These exercises gently re-build your muscles and joints. From there, you can work up to a more moderate-paced exercise routine. You can also work with a personal trainer who can customize a workout plan for you.

    Exercising should be comfortable. If you experience pain or any new symptoms when exercising, talk to your doctor right away.

  3. Keep tabs on your mental health. Your mental health can take a toll when you have Cushing’s syndrome—depression is common. If you feel blue or you don’t feel like doing the things you used to and you’re not sure why, don’t ignore it. Talk to your doctor—he or she can recommend a psychologist who can help you cope with your feelings throughout your recovery.

    You may also want to keep a journal to record how you feel on a day-to-day basis.

  4. Give yourself a break. Don’t be hard on yourself as your body recovers from Cushing’s syndrome. It’s important to get plenty of rest, relaxation, and sleep. Treat yourself to a gentle massage, warm bubble bath, or listen to soothing music. Now’s not the time to push yourself—respect your body and its limits.

Incorporating these lifestyle tips into your routine can not only help you live well, but they can help you thrive with Cushing’s syndrome.

Why Was This Woman Gaining Weight Despite Her Diet?

“I just can’t seem to lose weight,” the 59-year-old woman said quietly. She had tried everything, she told the young doctor, who was training to be an endocrinologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Weight Watchers. Exercise. She ate more vegetables, less fat, then fewer carbs. But still she was gaining weight, 30 pounds during the past seven months, including 12 in the past two weeks. She had never been skinny, she continued, but shapely. In her mid-40s, she started gaining weight, slowly at first, then rapidly. She was considering bariatric surgery, but she wanted to make sure she wasn’t missing something obvious. She had low thyroid hormones and had to take medication. Could her thyroid be off again?

The doctor asked her about symptoms associated with a low thyroid-hormone level. Fatigue? Yes, she was always tired. Changes in her hair or skin? No. Constipation? No. Do you get cold easier? Never. Indeed, these days she usually felt hot and sweaty.

It was probably not the thyroid, the doctor said. She asked if the woman had any other medical problems. She had high blood pressure and high cholesterol — both well controlled with medications. She also had obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which the soft tissue at the back of the throat collapse during sleep, cutting off air flow and waking the person many times throughout the night. She had a machine that helped keep her airway open, and she used it every night. She also had back pain, knee pain and carpal-tunnel syndrome. The pain was so bad that she had to retire from her job years before she was ready.

Big, Bigger, Biggest

The doctor examined her, then went to get Dr. Donald Smith, an endocrinologist and director of lipids and metabolism at Mount Sinai’s cardiovascular institute. After hearing a summary of the case, Smith asked the patient if she had anything to add. She did: She didn’t understand why she was getting so much bigger. Her legs were huge. She used to have nice ankles, but now you could hardly see them. Her doctor had given her a diuretic, but it hadn’t done a thing. Everything was large — her feet, her hands, even her face seemed somehow bigger. She hardly recognized the woman in the mirror. Her doctors just encouraged her to keep trying to lose weight.

Worth a Thousand Words

“Let me show you a picture,” she said suddenly and reached over to her purse. The patient’s sister had made a comment recently that led the patient to wonder whether the changes she saw in the mirror were more than simple aging. The patient pulled out a photograph of an attractive middle-aged woman and handed it to Smith. That was me eight years ago, she told him. Looking at the two faces, it was hard to believe they belonged to the same woman. Smith suspected this was something more than the extra pounds.

Two possibilities came to mind. Each was a disease of hormonal excess; each caused rapid weight gain. The first was Cushing’s disease, caused by overproduction of one of the fight-or-flight hormones, cortisol. The doctor looked at the patient, seeking clues. On her upper back, just below her neck, the woman had a subtle area of enlargement. This discrete accumulation of fat, called a buffalo hump, can occur with normal weight gain but is frequently seen in patients with Cushing’s. Do you bruise more easily these days? he asked. Cushing’s makes the skin fragile. No, she said. Did she have stretch marks on her stomach from the weight gain? The rapid expansion of the abdomen can cause the fragile skin to develop dark purple stretch lines. No. So maybe it wasn’t Cushing’s.

Find out the answer at http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/04/17/magazine/17mag-diagnosis.html#/#7

Day 27, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2016

I first saw a similar image to this one with the saying Life. Be in it at a recreation center when my son was little.  At the time, it was “Duh, of course I’m in it”.

The original image was one a couple males, a couple females and a dog walking/running.  No folks in wheelchairs, no older folks and certainly no zebras.

It would be nice to have everyone out there walking or running but that’s not real life, at least in the Cushie world.  It’s been a long time since I’ve really been In My Life – maybe it’s time to get back.

A dear friend who has not one, but two forms of cancer was traveling throughout Europe for the first time after her husband’s death wrote:

Some final words before I turn in for the night. If there is a spark of desire within you to do something which is not contrary to God’s Holy Law, find a way to make it happen. All things are possible and blessings abound for those who love Him. Life is such an adventure. Don’t be a spectator – live every single moment for Him and with Him.

Somedays, it’s hard even getting up in the morning but I’m trying.  I’ve tried Water Aerobics for People with Arthritis and I actually went to class twice a week, I got a “part-time” job four years ago, my son and I will play at Steinway Hall in NYC again in June, we have plans for another trip to Scotland to see/hear the Edinburgh Tattoo again.  This year, we plan to go to Lockerbie, as well!

This is the one and only life I’ll ever have and I want to make the most of it!

 

Day 1: Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2016

April is always Cushing’s Awareness Challenge month because Dr. Harvey Cushing was born on April 8th, 1869.

30-posts

Thanks to Robin for this wonderful past logo!  I’ve participated in these 30 days for Cushing’s Awareness several times so I’m not quite sure what is left to say this year but I always want to get the word out when I can.

As I see it, there have been some strides the diagnosis or treatment of Cushing’s since last year.  More drug companies are getting involved, more doctors seem to be willing to test, a bit more awareness, maybe.


April Fool's Day

How fitting that this challenge should begin on April Fool’s Day.  So much of Cushing’s  Syndrome/Disease makes us Cushies seem like we’re the April Fool.  Maybe, just maybe, it’s the doctors who are the April Fools…

Doctors tell us Cushing’s is too rare – you couldn’t possibly have it.  April Fools!

All you have to do is exercise and diet.  You’ll feel better.  April Fools!

Those bruises on your legs?  You’re just clumsy. April Fools!

Sorry you’re growing all that hair on your chin.  That happens as you age, you know.  April Fools!

Did you say you sleep all day?  You’re just lazy.  If you exercised more, you’d have more energy. April Fools!

You don’t have stretch marks.  April Fools!

You have stretch marks but they are the wrong [color/length/direction] April Fools!

The hump on the back of your neck is from your poor posture. April Fools!

Your MRI didn’t show a tumor.  You couldn’t have Cushing’s. April Fools!

This is all in your mind.  Take this prescription for antidepressants and go home.  April Fools!

If you have this one surgery, your life will get back to normal within a few months. April Fools!

What?  You had transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing’s?  You wasted your time and money. April Fools!

I am the doctor.  I know everything.  Do not try to find out any information online. You could not have Cushing’s.  It’s too rare…  April FOOL!

All this reminds me of a wonderful video a message board member posted a while ago:

So now – who is the April Fool?  It wasn’t me.  Don’t let it be you, either!

Interview with Deborah March 30, 2016

Deborah has many symptoms but is not yet diagnosed.

interview

Deborah will be our guest in an interview on BlogTalk Radio  Wednesday, March 30 at 6:00 PM eastern.  The Call-In number for questions or comments is (845) 241-9850.

The archived interview will be available after 7:00 PM Eastern through iTunes Podcasts (Cushie Chats) or BlogTalkRadio.  While you’re waiting, there are currently 89 other past interviews to listen to!

~~~~~~

Deborah’s Bio:

Hello all,

I do not know where to begin. For many years I have been struggling with these symptoms. I have proximal weakness, intolerance to stress, blood pressure fluctuations, hyperpigmentation, reactive hypoglycemia, sweating, severe dehydration, very bad confusion, vision, memory problems, physical body changes (hump, bruises), carb intolerance, and inability to exercise.

My endocrinologist did a workup for Cushing’s disease and the midnight saliva test was high. She brushed it off as “stress”. I am seeing a doctor now that says I have POTS and Dysautonomia. My doctor says I have inappropriate adrenaline rushes.

My body is falling apart because I haven’t found a doctor who will take my symptoms and test results serious. I would like to talk to others who are having trouble getting diagnosed and also to those who have gotten diagnosed who have a good doctor.

God Bless and Thank You,
Deborah

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