An unusual case of Cushing’s syndrome due to bihormonal ACTH–prolactin secreting pituitary macroadenoma with rapid response to cabergoline

  1. Shalini Kunasegaran1,2,
  2. Michael S Croxson1,
  3. Ian Holdaway1,
  4. Rinki Murphy1

+Author Affiliations


  1. 1Department of EndocrinologyAuckland District Health BoardAuckland, New Zealand

  2. 2Department of EndocrinologyWaitemata District Health BoardTakapuna, New Zealand
  1. Correspondence to Dr Shalini Kunasegaran, shal84@gmail.com
  • Accepted 13 July 2017
  • Published 7 August 2017

Summary

A 23-year-old man presenting with florid Cushing’s syndrome was found to have high plasma ACTH and very high serum prolactin. Pituitary MRI showed a large invasive macroadenoma.

Low-dose cabergoline promptly suppressed both ACTH and prolactin levels within 2 weeks, with unexpected clinical and biochemical hypocortisolism requiring hydrocortisone replacement. Secondary hypogonadism was reversed. Clinical and biochemical remission of his Cushing’s syndrome together with significant shrinkage of his macroadenoma has been maintained for 1 year on cabergoline 0.5 mg twice weekly. Reduction in pituitary

Reduction in pituitary tumour volume and brisk fall in serum prolactin in response to low-dose cabergoline is regularly observed in patients with macroprolactinomas, but the concurrent fall in the plasma ACTH level and hypocortisolism was a pleasant surprise.

We assume that he most likely has a single bihormonal adenoma that is enriched with dopamine-2 receptors.

From http://casereports.bmj.com/content/2017/bcr-2017-219921.short?rss=1

Lower health-related quality of life observed in patients with Addison’s disease, Cushing’s syndrome

Patients with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulations report health-related quality of life that is far lower than that of the general population, according to findings of a prospective study.

“In most centers, both patients with adrenal deficiency and patients with Cushing’s syndrome are managed by the same team,” Charlotte DeBucy, of the Center for Rare Adrenal Diseases at Cochin Hospital in Paris, and colleagues wrote. “Despite the usual perception that both types of diseases alter quality of life, few studies have similarly investigated the impact of cortisol dysregulations on [health-related quality of life]. Such studies are important, however, to identify meaningful differences that would be important to consider to improve management and outcome.”

De Bucy and colleagues analyzed data from 343 patients with Addison’s disease or Cushing’s syndrome followed in routine practice at a single center in France between September 2007 and April 2014 (78% women; mean age, 48 years; mean length of time since diagnosis, 7.8 years; 61% married). All participants completed the short-form health survey (SF-36), a survey of health-related quality-of-life measures and the 12-item general health questionnaire (GHQ-12), a measure of psychological well-being or distress. Questionnaires were completed at baseline and at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months. Patients with Cushing’s syndrome were also assessed for cortisol status at baseline and at follow-up evaluations.

Within the cohort, 206 had Cushing’s syndrome of pituitary origin, 91 had Cushing’s syndrome of adrenal origin and 46 patients had Addison’s disease; 16% were included in the study before any treatment was initiated.

Researchers found that mean standard deviation scores for psychological and physical dimensions of the SF-36 were “well below” those of the general population, but diagnosis, cortisol status and time since treatment initiation all influenced individual scores. Cushing’s syndrome of pituitary origin was associated with worse health-related quality of life, especially for physical functioning, social functioning and mental health. In Cushing’s syndrome, health-related quality of life was generally worse during periods of hypercortisolism, but scores for these patients were lower than those of patients with Addison’s disease even during periods of hypocortisolism or eucortisolism, according to the researchers.

“The differences were particularly large for physical functioning and role-physical subscales,” the researchers wrote.

They also found that mental health scores for patients with Cushing’s syndrome decreased during periods of hypocortisolism, whereas other adrenal conditions were associated with higher mental health scores.

More than half of patients, regardless of diagnosis and cortisol status, had psychological distress requiring attention, according to the GHQ-12 survey.

“Our findings are important for clinical practice,” the researchers wrote. “The consequences of cortisol dysregulation on [health-related quality of life] should be considered in the management of adrenal insufficiency and even more (in) Cushing’s syndrome patients, and these consequences can be long term, affecting apparently cured patients. Early information on these consequences might be helpful for patients who often perceive a poor quality of life as the result of inadequate disease control or treatment. Even if this possibility exists, knowing that adrenal diseases have long-lasting effects on [health-related quality of life] may be helpful for patients to cope with them.” – by Regina Schaffer

Disclosure: L’association Surrénales supported this study. The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

From http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/in-the-journals/%7B842655ce-e710-4476-a3c2-2909b06434ed%7D/lower-health-related-quality-of-life-observed-in-patients-with-addisons-disease-cushings-syndrome

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