Transsphenoidal Surgery Leads to Remission in Children with Cushing’s Disease

Transsphenoidal surgery — a minimally invasive surgery for removing pituitary tumors in Cushing’s disease patients — is also effective in children and adolescents with the condition, leading to remission with a low rate of complications, a study reports.

The research, “Neurosurgical treatment of Cushing disease in pediatric patients: case series and review of literature,” was published in the journal Child’s Nervous System.

Transsphenoidal (through the nose) pituitary surgery is the main treatment option for children with Cushing’s disease. It allows the removal of pituitary adenomas without requiring long-term replacement therapy, but negative effects on growth and puberty have been reported.

In the study, a team from Turkey shared its findings on 10 children and adolescents (7 females) with the condition, who underwent microsurgery (TSMS) or endoscopic surgery (ETSS, which is less invasive) — the two types of transsphenoidal surgery.

At the time of surgery, the patients’ mean age was 14.8 years, and they had been experiencing symptoms for a mean average of 24.2 months. All but one had gained weight, with a mean body mass index of 29.97.

Their symptoms included excessive body hair, high blood pressure, stretch marks, headaches, acne, “moon face,” and the absence of menstruation.

The patients were diagnosed with Cushing’s after their plasma cortisol levels were measured, and there was a lack of cortical level suppression after they took a low-dose suppression treatment. Measurements of their adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) hormone levels then revealed the cause of their disease was likely pituitary tumors.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, however, only enabled tumor localization in seven patients: three with a microadenoma (a tumor smaller than 10 millimeters), and four showed a macroadenoma.

CD diagnosis was confirmed by surgery and the presence of characteristic pituitary changes. The three patients with no sign of adenoma on their MRIs showed evidence of ACTH-containing adenomas on tissue evaluation.

Eight patients underwent TSMS, and 2 patients had ETSS, with no surgical complications. The patients were considered in remission if they showed clinical adrenal insufficiency and serum cortisol levels under 2.5 μg/dl 48 hours after surgery, or a cortisol level lower than 1.8 μg/dl with a low-dose dexamethasone suppression test at three months post-surgery. Restoration of normal plasma cortisol variation, eased symptoms, and no sign of adenoma in MRI were also requirements for remission.

Eight patients (80%) achieved remission, 4 of them after TSMS. Two patients underwent additional TSMS for remission. Also, 1 patient had ETSS twice after TSMS to gain remission, while another met the criteria after the first endoscopic surgery.

The data further showed that clinical recovery and normalized biochemical parameters were achieved after the initial operation in 5 patients (50%). Three patients (30%) were considered cured after additional operations.

The mean cortisol level decreased to 8.71 μg/dl post-surgery from 23.435 μg/dl pre-surgery. All patients were regularly evaluated in an outpatient clinic, with a mean follow-up period of 11 years.

Two patients showed pituitary insufficiency. Also, 2 had persistent hypocortisolism — too little cortisol — one of whom also had diabetes insipidus, a disorder that causes an imbalance of water in the body. Radiotherapy was not considered in any case.

“Transsphenoidal surgery remains the mainstay therapy for CD [Cushing’s disease] in pediatric patients as well as adults,” the scientists wrote. “It is an effective treatment option with low rate of complications.”

 

From https://cushingsdiseasenews.com/2019/01/15/transsphenoidal-surgery-enables-cushings-disease-remission-pediatric-patients-study/

GH therapy increases fracture risk in patients previously treated for acromegaly

van Varsseveld NC, et al. Pituitary. 2016;doi:10.1007/s11102-016-0716-3.

Adult patients with severe growth hormone deficiency previously treated for acromegaly saw an increased fracture risk after 6 years of growth hormone replacement therapy, whereas those previously treated for Cushing’s disease did not experience the same risk, according to a recent observational study.

Nadege C. van Varsseveld, MD, of the department of internal medicine at VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, and colleagues analyzed data from 1,028 patients with previous nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA; n = 783), acromegaly (n = 65) and Cushing’s disease (n = 180), identified through the Dutch National Registry of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults, a nationwide, long-term surveillance study in patients with severe GH deficiency. Data were collected biannually from medical records through 2009. Baseline DXA measurements were available for 414 patients; 71 (17.1%) had osteoporosis at one or more of the measured sites; 147 (35.5%) had osteopenia.

During a mean follow-up of 5.2 years, researchers found that 166 of patients with previous NFPA were prescribed osteoporosis medications (21.3%), as were 69 patients with previous Cushing’s disease (38.5%) and 22 patients with previous acromegaly (33.4%). During follow-up, 39 patients experienced fractures (3.8%; 32 experiencing one fracture), including 26 patients in the previous NFPA group, eight patients in the previous Cushing’s disease group and five patients in the previous acromegaly group. The median time between baseline and first fracture was 2.4 years (mean age, 59 years).

Researchers found that fracture risk did not differ between groups before 6 years’ follow-up. Fracture risk increased in patients with previous acromegaly after 6 years’ follow-up, but not for those with previous Cushing’s disease vs. patients with NFPA. Results persisted after adjustment for multiple factors, including sex, age, fracture history and the extent of pituitary insufficiency.

The researchers noted that patients with previous Cushing’s disease were younger and more often women and had a greater history of osteopenia or osteoporosis, whereas patients with acromegaly had a longer duration between tumor treatment and the start of GH therapy and were treated more often with radiotherapy.

“During active acromegaly, increased bone turnover has been observed, but reported effects on [bone mineral density] are heterogeneous,” the researchers wrote. “It is postulated that cortical BMD increases, whereas trabecular BMD decreases or remains unaffected.

“The increased fracture risk in the present study may be a long-term effect of impaired skeletal health due to previous GH excess, even though this was not reflected by an increased occurrence of osteopenia or osteoporosis in the medical history,” the researchers wrote. – by Regina Schaffer

Disclosure: One researcher reports receiving consultancy fees from Novartis and Pfizer.

From http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/hormone-therapy/news/online/%7B92a67ad7-3bd5-46f0-b999-0a8e3486edab%7D/gh-therapy-increases-fracture-risk-in-patients-previously-treated-for-acromegaly

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