RARE Patient Advocacy Summit Details and Invitation

We would like to invite you and your community to join us for our fourth annual RARE Patient Advocacy Summit September 24 – 25, 2015 in Huntington Beach, California!  Join the community at this unique event for rare disease patients and advocates: Connect. Educate. Engage. Achieve. 

Registration is open!

This Summit is for every patient, patient advocacy leader, and anyone who cares about rare.  Please take a look at this year’s compelling agenda and consider participating in an event that you won’t want to miss!

 

Why attend? Here’s what you’ll gain:

  • Practical next steps for taking action in the areas of research, legislation, fundraising, and community support
  • Core fundamentals and skills to help you start, grow and strengthen your nonprofit organization
  • Strategies for building online communities and why they are essential for rare disease awareness
  • Understanding the power of genetic data and patient involvement for advancing research for your disease
  • Tools and insights into crafting successful collaborations with researchers, biotech, pharma and the FDA
  • Invaluable connections with advocacy leaders that will help you define and propel your rare disease priorities forward

Register for the Summit and learn more on travel scholarships

Register now and secure your spot at the leading conference for rare disease patient advocates today!  We have a limited number of travel scholarships available, which you may request here.  Scholarship applications will be accepted through July 27, 2015.

 

Want to learn more?  Sign up for our Information Session!

Sign up today for an information session on the Summit where we’ll walk you through the details, the agenda and opportunities to learn and connect, and more on how to share this with your community. Here’s how to register for the information session on July 15, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. PDT/5:00 p.m. EDT. Patients, advocates, advocacy group leaders – all are welcome to participate!

 

Can’t attend in person?

There is no reason you, your organizational leadership or community should miss out!  Sign up to join the conference via Livestream through your computer and learn more about how you can still be an active participant using Twitter.

 

We hope to see you at the Summit!

 

Sincerely,

Kym, Carrie & Lisa

 

Kym H. Kilbourne                                          

VP, Patient Advocacy                                     

kymk@globalgenes.org

 

Carrie Ostrea

Manager, Advocacy/Parent Advocate

carrieo@globalgenes.org

 

Lisa Schill

Advocacy Ambassador/Parent Advocate

lschill@globalgenes.org 

Day Twenty-seven, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2015

So often during the diagnosis phase of Cushing’s I felt like this picture – I was walking alone to an unknown place with an unknown future.

My diagnosis was pre-Internet which meant that any information had to be gotten from libraries, bookstores, magazines…or doctors.  In 1983 to 1986 I knew something was terribly wrong but there was no backup from doctors, family or friends.  My first hope was from a magazine (see Day Six)

After I got that first glimmer of hope, it was off to the library to try to understand medical texts.  I would pick out words I did understand – and it was more words each trip.  All my research led me to Cushing’s.

Unfortunately, the research didn’t lead me to doctors who could help for several years.  That contributed greatly to the loneliness.  If a Doctor says you’re not sick, friends and family are going to believe the doctor, not you.  After all, he’s the one trained to know what’s wrong, or find out.

I was so grateful when I finally got into a clinical trial at NIH and was so nice not to be alone with this mystery illness.  I was also surprised to learn, awful as I felt, there were Cushies much worse off than I was.

I am so glad that the Internet is here now helping us all know that we’re not alone anymore.

 

 

We’re all in this together with help, support, research, just being there.  I love this quote from Catherine at http://wheniwasyou.wordpress.com/2012/03/31/wheniwasyou/

Mary, I am delighted to see you here. Cushings – because of the persistent central obesity caused by (we know now) the lack of growth hormone plus the hypothyroidism I was diagnosed with (but for which treatment was ineffective due to my lack of cortisol) – was one of the things I considered as an explanation for my symptoms. Your site was enormously educational and helpful to me in figuring out what might be happening to me. Those other patient testimonies I referred to? Many of them were the bios you posted. Thank you so much for commenting. I am so grateful for the support and encouragement. I really hope that my experiences will help other undiagnosed hypopituitary patients find their way to a diagnosis. I often used to dream that one day I’d get to say to others what was so often said to me: don’t give up, there will be an answer. I kept believing in myself because people I hadn’t even met believed in me. Now I am finally here and I do hope my story will help others to have faith in their own instincts.

Thanks again. Please do keep in touch.

Catherine

 

Research Study: An Open Label Study to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of COR-003 (2S, 4R-ketoconazole) in the Treatment of Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome

Objectives:         

The purpose of this study is to test the effects of different doses of COR-003 on people with Cushing’s syndrome (CS) primarily by measuring the cortisol levels in urine and secondarily by measuring other health parameters such as blood pressure, weight, and liver function. This study is also being conducted to see if there is any harm caused when using COR-003.

This study is an open label study. That means both the health providers and the participants in the study are aware of the drug or treatment being given.

Eligibility:

Adult Subjects (18 years or older) with elevated levels of cortisol due to endogenous CS.

Confirmed diagnosis of persistent or recurrent CS (with or without therapy) or newly diagnosed disease, if subjects are not candidates for surgery. CS will be defined according to the criteria in the guidelines for diagnosis of CS (Nieman 2008).

Women who are pregnant or lactating are not eligible for this study.

Individuals with other health conditions or diagnoses may not be eligible for this study.

These and other eligibility criteria are best reviewed with a doctor who is participating in the study. You can also get more detailed eligibility information about the study by clicking here to visit http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

Study Design:

  • The study will begin with a screening period to make sure subjects are eligible to participate in the study.
  • After the screening period, subjects who are eligible for participation will each be given several different doses of COR-003, to be taken orally in tablet form.
  • After an individualized dose has been selected, participants will take COR-003 for six months.
  • Finally, participants will continue in the study for an additional six months at doses to be determined by the study doctor.

 

Throughout the study, participants will meet regularly with a study doctor and will take part in a variety of medical tests to make sure they are doing well and to see if COR-003 is working.

Participants in the study should be sure they have the time to participate. Participants will generally be followed for over a year:

Study Locations

The study is currently taking place in several places around the world (United States, Belgium, France, Israel, Netherlands, Spain, and Sweden).
Additional information on the study can be found at clinicaltrials.gov through this link.

Study sponsor: Cortendo AB

For more information, please contact:

Jim Ellis at Cortendo AB tel: +1 (610) 254-9245 or jellis@cortendo.com

 

What would Harvey Cushing say about Cushing’s disease today?

harvey-book

(BPT) – More than 80 years ago renowned neurosurgeon, Dr. Harvey Cushing, discovered a tumor on the pituitary gland as the cause of a serious, hormone disorder that leads to dramatic physical changes in the body in addition to life-threatening health concerns. The discovery was so profound it came to be known as Cushing’s disease. While much has been learned about Cushing’s disease since the 1930s, awareness of this rare pituitary condition is still low and people often struggle for years before finding the right diagnosis.

Read on to meet the man behind the discovery and get his perspective on the present state of Cushing’s disease.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about the time it takes for people with Cushing’s disease to receive an accurate diagnosis?

Cushing’s disease still takes too long to diagnose!

Despite advances in modern technology, the time to diagnosis for a person with Cushing’s disease is on average six years. This is partly due to the fact that symptoms, which may include facial rounding, thin skin and easy bruising, excess body and facial hair and central obesity, can be easily mistaken for other conditions. Further awareness of the disease is needed as early diagnosis has the potential to lead to a more favorable outcome for people with the condition.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about the advances made in how the disease is diagnosed?

Significant progress has been made as several options are now available for physicians to use in diagnosing Cushing’s disease.

In addition to routine blood work and urine testing, health care professionals are now also able to test for biochemical markers – molecules that are found in certain parts of the body including blood and urine and can help to identify the presence of a disease or condition.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about disease management for those with Cushing’s disease today?

Patients now have choices but more research is still needed.

There are a variety of disease management options for those living with Cushing’s disease today. The first line and most common management approach for Cushing’s disease is the surgical removal of the tumor. However, there are other management options, such as medication and radiation that may be considered for patients when surgery is not appropriate or effective.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about the importance of ongoing monitoring in patients with Cushing’s disease?

Routine check-ups and ongoing monitoring are key to successfully managing Cushing’s disease.

The same tests used in diagnosing Cushing’s disease, along with imaging tests and clinical suspicion, are used to assess patients’ hormone levels and monitor for signs and symptoms of a relapse. Unfortunately, more than a third of patients experience a relapse in the condition so even patients who have been surgically treated require careful long-term follow up.

* What would Harvey Cushing say about Cushing’s disease patient care?

Cushing’s disease is complex and the best approach for patients is a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals working together guiding patient care.

Whereas years ago patients may have only worked with a neurosurgeon, today patients are typically treated by a variety of health care professionals including endocrinologists, neurologists, radiologists, mental health professionals and nurses. We are much more aware of the psychosocial impact of Cushing’s disease and patients now have access to mental health professionals, literature, patient advocacy groups and support groups to help them manage the emotional aspects of the disease.

Learn More

Novartis is committed to helping transform the care of rare pituitary conditions and bringing meaningful solutions to people living with Cushing’s disease. Recognizing the need for increased awareness, Novartis developed the “What Would Harvey Cushing Say?” educational initiative that provides hypothetical responses from Dr. Cushing about various aspects of Cushing’s disease management based on the Endocrine Society’s Clinical Guidelines.

For more information about Cushing’s disease, visit www.CushingsDisease.com or watch educational Cushing’s disease videos on the Novartis YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/Novartis.

 

From http://www.jsonline.com/sponsoredarticles/health-wellness/what-would-harvey-cushing-say-about-cushings-disease-today8087390508-253383751.html

Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency Research

Earn money for Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency research

The purpose of this research is to obtain your feedback on the design of a new pen injector and the instructional materials. No injections or medication will be given during the research session; this is strictly an observational research project, and all responses will be kept confidential.

Qualified participants will receive a total stipend of $250. This study will take place over 2 days, 1 hour each day.

If you or someone you know fits this description and lives in the San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Philadelphia or the San Diego area, please call:

Trotta Associates (San Francisco/Los Angeles)- Michelle @ 310-306-6866 x65

Dallas by Definition (Dallas)- Jessie @ 1-800-336-1417

Group Dynamics (Philadelphia)- Alice @ 610-822-1010

Taylor Research (San Diego)- Ben @ 858-810-8400 x203

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