Topical Steroid Use in Psoriasis Patient Leads to Severe Adrenal Insufficiency

This article is written live from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) 2017 Annual Meeting in Austin, TX. MPR will be reporting news on the latest findings from leading experts in endocrinology. Check back for more news from AACE 2017.

 

At the AACE 2017 Annual Meeting, lead study author Kaitlyn Steffensmeier, MS III, of the Dayton Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, Dayton, OH, presented a case study describing a patient “who developed secondary adrenal insufficiency secondary to long-term topical steroid use and who with decreased topical steroid use recovered.”

The patient was a 63-year-old white male with a 23-year history of psoriasis. For 18 years, the patient had been applying Clobetasol Propionate 0.05% topically on several areas of his body every day. Upon presentation to the endocrine clinic for evaluation of his low serum cortisol, the patient complained of a 24-pound weight gain over a 2-year period, feeling fatigued, as well as facial puffiness.

Laboratory analysis found that the patient’s random serum cortisol and ACTH levels were low (0.2µg/dL and <1.1pg/mL, respectively). According to the study authors, “the labs were indicative of secondary adrenal insufficiency.” Additionally, a pituitary MRI “showed a 2mm hypoenhancing lesion within the midline of the pituitary gland consistent with Rathke’s cleft cyst versus pituitary microadenoma.”

The patient was initiated on 10mg of hydrocortisone in the morning and 5mg in the evening and was instructed to decrease the use of his topical steroid to one time per month. For the treatment of his psoriasis, the patient was started on apremilast, a phosphodiesterase-4 enzyme (PDE4) inhibitor, and phototherapy.

After 2.5 years, the patient had a subnormal response to the cosyntropin stimulation test. However, after 3 years, a normal response with an increase in serum cortisol to 18.7µg/dL at 60 minutes was obtained; the patient was then discontinued on hydrocortisone. Additionally, a stable pituitary tumor was shown via a repeat pituitary MRI.

The study authors explained that, although secondary adrenal insufficiency is not commonly reported, “one study showed 40% of patients with abnormal cortisol response to exogenous ACTH after two weeks of topical glucocorticoids usage.” Another meta-analysis of 15 studies (n=320) revealed 4.7% of patients developing adrenal insufficiency after using topical steroids. Because of this, “clinicians need to be aware of potential side effects of prolong topical steroid use,” added the study authors.

For continuous endocrine news coverage from the AACE 2017 Annual Meeting, check back to MPR’s AACE page for the latest updates.

From http://www.empr.com/aace-2017/topical-steroid-psoriasis-clobestasol-propionate/article/654335/

Scalp Hair Cortisol Accurate in Cushing’s Syndrome Diagnosis

Scalp hair cortisol measurement is an accurate first-line diagnostic test for Cushing’s syndrome in adults and offers several advantages over other first-line diagnostic procedures, according to findings published in the European Journal of Endocrinology.

“[Hair cortisol content] has practical advantages over currently used diagnostic tests, since sample collection can easily be performed in an outpatient setting and is not dependent on patient adherence to sampling instructions,” Elisabeth F. C. van Rossum, MD, PhD, professor at Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam in the Netherlands, and colleagues wrote. “Furthermore, [hair cortisol content] measurement offers retrospective information about cortisol levels over months of time in a single measurement, thereby potentially circumventing the limitations posed by the variability in cortisol secretion in endogenous [Cushing’s syndrome].”

Van Rossum and colleagues analyzed data from 43 patients with confirmed endogenous Cushing’s syndrome and 35 patients with suspected Cushing’s syndrome in whom diagnosis was excluded after testing (patient controls), all evaluated between 2009 and 2016 at an endocrinology outpatient clinic at Erasmus MC. Adults from a previously published validation study served as healthy controls (n = 174). Researchers measured scalp hair samples, 24-hour urinary free cortisol, serum cortisol and salivary cortisol, and used Pearson’s correlation to determine associations between hair cortisol content and first-line screening tests for Cushing’s syndrome.

Hair cortisol content was highest in patients with Cushing’s syndrome (geometric mean, 106.9 pg/mg; 95% CI, 77.1-147.9) and higher compared with both healthy controls (mean, 8.4 pg/mg; 95% CI, 7-10) and patient controls (mean, 12.7 pg/mg; 95% CI, 8.6-18.6). Using healthy controls as the reference population, researchers found that the optimal cutoff for diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome via hair cortisol content was 31.1 pg/mg; sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 90%, respectively (area under the curve = 0.958). Results were similar when using patient controls as the reference population, according to the researchers.

Hair cortisol content was correlated with urinary free cortisol (P < .001), serum cortisol (P < .001) and late-night salivary cortisol (P < .001). In addition, in two patients with ectopic Cushing’s syndrome, researchers observed a gradual rise in hair cortisol content in the 3 to 6 months before disease diagnosis.

“Together with a straightforward sample collection procedure, this method may prove to be a convenient noninvasive screening test for [Cushing’s syndrome],” the researchers wrote. “Additionally, our results indicate that hair cortisol measurements provide clinicians a tool to retrospectively assess cortisol secretion in patients with [Cushing’s syndrome], months to years back in time. This also offers the opportunity to estimate the onset of hypercortisolism and thus the duration of the disease before diagnosis.” – by Regina Schaffer

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

From http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/adrenal/news/in-the-journals/%7B72da0183-e1a8-48cb-a1fd-332c7999beb5%7D/scalp-hair-cortisol-accurate-in-cushings-syndrome-diagnosis

Patients with ARMC5 mutations: The NIH clinical experience

Screenshot 2016-05-27 13.12.55

 

Adrenal Disorders

R Correa, M Zilbermint, A Demidowich, F Faucz, A Berthon, J Bertherat, M Lodish, C Stratakis

Summary: Researchers conducted this study to describe the different phenotypical characteristics of patients with armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) mutations, located in 16p11.2 and a likely tumor-suppressor gene. They determined that patients with bilateral adrenal enlargement, found on imaging tests, should be screened for ARMC5 mutations, which are associated with subclinical Cushing’s syndrome (CS) and primary hyperaldosteronism (PA).

Methods:

  • Researchers identified 20 patients with ARMC5 mutations (germline and/or somatic) who were enrolled in a National Institutes of Health (NIH) protocol.
  • They obtained sociodemographic, clinical, laboratory, and radiological data for all participants.

Results:

  • Three families (with a total of 8 patients) were identified with ARMC5 germline mutations; the rest of the patients (13/20) had sporadic mutations.
  • The male to female ratio was 1.2:1; mean age was 48 years and 60% of patients were African American.
  • Forty percent of patients were diagnosed with CS, 20% with subclinical CS, 30% with hyperaldosteronism, and 10% had no diagnosis.
  • The mean serum cortisol (8 am) and Urinary Free Cortisol were 13.1 mcg/dl and 77 mcg/24 hours, respectively.
  • Nearly all patients (95%) had bilateral adrenal enlargement found on CT or MRI.
  • Patients underwent the following treatments: Bilateral adrenalectomy (45%), unilateral adrenalectomy (25%), medical treatment (20%), and no treatment (10%).
  • ARMC5 mutations are associated with primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PMAH) and are also seen in patients with PA, especially among African Americans.

From http://www.mdlinx.com/endocrinology/conference-abstract.cfm/ZZ37C4C5D3BF1A4FAE9C479A696660535B/57884/?utm_source=confcoveragenl&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_content=abstract-list&utm_campaign=abstract-AACE2016&nonus=0

Cushing’s disease recurrence predictive factors: Outcome analysis of patients in VANCOUVER over 30 years

Screenshot 2016-05-27 13.12.55

 

Pituitary Disorders/Neuroendocrinology

R Chen, J Levi, M Almalki, S Yi, M Johnson, E Ur

Summary: The objective of this study was to describe the management and outcomes of patients with Cushing’s disease (CD) in the Vancouver region over a 30-year period and to investigate the predictive factors of CD recurrence. Researchers found CD recurrence in 45.8% of patients who received initial transsphenoidal surgery (TSS), and that a post-operative serum cortisol level > 140nmol/L may be a positive predictor of recurrence in these patients.

Methods:

  • Researchers retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts from endocrinologists in Vancouver who provided consent to participate in this study.
  • Included in this study were 48 patients diagnosed with CD since 1985.

Results:

  • All 48 patients received initial TSS; the mean follow-up time was 11.73 (±6.98) years.
  • More than half of the patients (n=26, 54.2%) remained in remission, and 22 patients (45.8%) received subsequent interventions due to CD recurrence.
  • Second-line therapies included repeat TSS (40.9%), stereotactic radiotherapy (18.2%), and bilateral adrenalectomy (36.4%).
  • Among patients with disease recurrence, the average post-operative serum cortisol level was significantly higher (489.0 nmol/L vs 114.7nmol/L; P=0.003).
  • The positive predictive value for recurrence with post-operative serum cortisol > 140nmol/L was 76.5% (P=0.049), while serum cortisol < 140nmol/L had an 80% predictive value for non-recurrence (P=0.035).

From http://www.mdlinx.com/endocrinology/conference-abstract.cfm/ZZ37C4C5D3BF1A4FAE9C479A696660535B/57894/?utm_source=confcoveragenl&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_content=abstract-list&utm_campaign=abstract-AACE2016&nonus=0

A Single-Center 10-Year Experience with Pasireotide in Cushing’s Disease: Patients’ Characteristics and Outcome

Pasireotide is the first pituitary-directed drug approved for treating patients with Cushing’s disease (CD). Our 10-year experience with pasireotide in CD is reported here.

Twenty patients with de novo, persistent, or recurrent CD after pituitary surgery were treated with pasireotide from December 2003 to December 2014. Twelve patients were treated with pasireotide in randomized trials and 8 patients with pasireotide sc (Signifor®; Novartis AG, Basel, Switzerland) in clinical practice. The mean treatment duration was 20.5 months (median 9 months; range, 3-72 months).

Urinary free cortisol (UFC) levels mean percentage change (± SD) at last follow-up was-40.4% (± 35.1; range, 2-92%; median reduction 33.3%) with a normalization rate of 50% (10/20). Ten patients achieved sustained normalized late night salivary cortisol (LNSC) levels during treatment. LNSC normalization was associated with UFC normalization in 7/10 patients. Serum cortisol and plasma ACTH significantly decreased from baseline to last follow-up. Body weight decrease and blood pressure improvement during pasireotide treatment were independent from UFC response. Glucose profile worsening was observed in all patients except one. The frequency of diabetes mellitus increased from 40% (8/20) at baseline to 85% (17/20) at last follow-up requiring initiation of medical treatment only in 44% of patients.

Pasireotide treatment was associated with sustained biochemical and clinical benefit in about 60% of CD patients. Glucose profile alteration is a frequent complication of pasireotide treatment; however, it seems to be easy to manage with diet and lifestyle intervention in almost half of the patients.

From http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27127913

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